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Author Topic: 30lb Braid vs 50 lb Braid for Float Fishing  (Read 1844 times)

psd1179

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Re: 30lb Braid vs 50 lb Braid for Float Fishing
« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2022, 07:20:59 PM »

min 40lb braid as main line. first it is easier to deal with wrap or tangle, and it is slightly better to avoid break.

But the floating rig, the float, weight etc are all in 5-7ft 25lb mono. the most annoying tangle is the weight and float or hooks twisted together and ruin everything. with the mono, this issue is not present.

It is also easy to switch float rig to lure, simply replace the floating rig as a set.
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jim

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Re: 30lb Braid vs 50 lb Braid for Float Fishing
« Reply #16 on: November 20, 2022, 08:18:25 AM »

I have been trying the 45lb Camo braid from Suffix. fine product but the tip wrap when you break off is irritating!!!
I have some 20lb braid to try on the spinning reel, but have yet to do so.
A friend has been fishing this fall (newbie) using 9.5 foot rod and spinning reel ,mono line, has caught a coho and springs and lots of chums. He is now sick and tired of the loops, backlashes, and line maintenance. He is ready to try out his new entry level center pin reel and 10.5 rod. His learning curve on how to cast it is slowly happening.
 My question is when you look at a rod, new or old, how to tell if the line guides are going to handle the braided line. cheap guides get deep ruts in them in no time at all.
 Maybe I should start my own thread...
« Last Edit: November 20, 2022, 08:23:38 AM by jim »
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DanL

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Re: 30lb Braid vs 50 lb Braid for Float Fishing
« Reply #17 on: November 20, 2022, 06:25:27 PM »

re: mending, it is easier to mend lighter line vs heavier and that should apply whether it's mono or braid. Having more weight that must be managed/lifted out of the water can only have a greater effect on the drift. Doubly so for those who like to hold the whole line out of the water; the heavier the line for a given length, the greater the drag that must be transmitted to the float

FWIW braid doesnt actually float (ie its density is not less than water) but it can be light enough to sit in the surface film without breaking surface tension and thus floats under the right conditions. If something makes it break the surface tension (like turbulence), then it will sink.

Has a shock mono leader been a game changer for you? Is it worth the extra visibility vs the spook factor? Keep in mind I float fish with a spinning reel. 

The greatest benefit of the mono shock section (IMHO) is to have a break point weaker than the main line so if you snag up then you have somewhere that will fail and not potentially leave a huge length of braid behind. Particularly useful for spinning applications where you may not otherwise really need an actual leader.

Quote
I guess my question is more concerned with getting the best drift possible.

I guess it comes down to what factor is the most important to you in the 'best' drift, but I assume you mean trying to get drag-free as possible. From that perspective, the lightest mainline you are willing to use will perform best. Yes, there are compromises like more propensity for tangling, but that's a separate issue.

To be fair, if you're goal is the 'best drift possible', a spinning reel is not going to be the best tool for it (but you seem cognizant of that already). People can and do successfully float fish with spinning reels, but you're sacrificing a lot of finesse and ability to manage your line.  Just my $0.02

Do you use your spinning rod for actual spinning applications like spoons/spinners/etc? If so, then even more reason for going as light as possible. You'll be needlessly sacrificing a lot of distance going too heavy on mainline.
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Darko

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Re: 30lb Braid vs 50 lb Braid for Float Fishing
« Reply #18 on: November 20, 2022, 10:36:04 PM »

re: mending, it is easier to mend lighter line vs heavier and that should apply whether it's mono or braid. Having more weight that must be managed/lifted out of the water can only have a greater effect on the drift. Doubly so for those who like to hold the whole line out of the water; the heavier the line for a given length, the greater the drag that must be transmitted to the float

FWIW braid doesnt actually float (ie its density is not less than water) but it can be light enough to sit in the surface film without breaking surface tension and thus floats under the right conditions. If something makes it break the surface tension (like turbulence), then it will sink.

The greatest benefit of the mono shock section (IMHO) is to have a break point weaker than the main line so if you snag up then you have somewhere that will fail and not potentially leave a huge length of braid behind. Particularly useful for spinning applications where you may not otherwise really need an actual leader.

I guess it comes down to what factor is the most important to you in the 'best' drift, but I assume you mean trying to get drag-free as possible. From that perspective, the lightest mainline you are willing to use will perform best. Yes, there are compromises like more propensity for tangling, but that's a separate issue.

To be fair, if you're goal is the 'best drift possible', a spinning reel is not going to be the best tool for it (but you seem cognizant of that already). People can and do successfully float fish with spinning reels, but you're sacrificing a lot of finesse and ability to manage your line.  Just my $0.02

Do you use your spinning rod for actual spinning applications like spoons/spinners/etc? If so, then even more reason for going as light as possible. You'll be needlessly sacrificing a lot of distance going too heavy on mainline.
yea I have 7 ft medium weight spinning rod for casting lures. I use a 10'6 Shimano Convergence for float fishing. My reel is a quantum blue runner. I just want my drift to be smooth which I have gotten good at letting the line out relatively smoothly. I just wanted to hear other's experiences with the different braids. Thing I don't like about braid is sometimes the floating line and also the tip wrap. I'm not sure mending is the same because the braid is way thinner so I think the heavier does make a difference though the mending part is the part im not the most knowledgeable about. Keeping just enough out is really hard, especially when its cold.
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