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Author Topic: braid line  (Read 764 times)

wayat

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braid line
« on: June 06, 2024, 03:46:28 AM »

I thought I would put braid line on my spinning reel, but the salesman recommended that I not.
Anyone have an opinion on this?
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dennisK

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Re: braid line
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2024, 06:04:11 AM »

I've been using braid line on all my spinning reels for years. Both in fresh water and salt. I love it. I can cast further and there is no memory on the line. Also I find the longevity is much better too. Put on the braid and have fun.

ps. always use a leader (which breaks off first) but no one I know fishes straight braid. That would be crazy lol.

Also modern rods have guides that tough enough to withstand braid no problem. My $25 junk walmart rod from bellingham is fine after a decade.

And about drag being too tight and getting slippage - maybe if you are fishing 100lb tuna but I've never had that happen even with large springs or small sharks (hawaii).

And water absorption and freezing - yeah don't leave your reel out overnight during a blizzard.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2024, 07:21:16 AM by dennisK »
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jim

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Re: braid line
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2024, 06:11:21 AM »

It has no stretch, so if your drag is too tight, the fish will pull off.
If you snag on bottom, you make break off leaving braid on the bottom, then everyone else who snags there will break off, soon a large rats nest forms there.
They do recommend a top shot of mono, say 5 to 10 feet, as a breakoff sacrifice line. Must use a very good knot on the braid to mono connection.
Also it is able to absorb water, so in the winter the spool can freeze overnight and be useless in the morning.
It can ruin the line guides on your rod by cutting grooves in them.
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RalphH

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Re: braid line
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2024, 07:49:33 AM »

I thought I would put braid line on my spinning reel, but the salesman recommended that I not.
Anyone have an opinion on this?

Hard to know the reason for that opinion without asking the person who served you. It may have been based on the sort of fishing you do. HQ braid is expensive. Perhaps he thought it wasn't worth it for you. Last reel I bought I had it filled with a HQ braid (Powerpro) and it cost $40. Many anglers put a lower cost braid such as dacron on the inner half o of the spool and top it off with braid. That requires a knot in the middle or a splice. Not to worry, if you really want braid you can buy it a little later after your mono starts to wear out.
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SuperBobby

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Re: braid line
« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2024, 09:56:36 AM »

When it comes to flossing for sockeye and springs on the Fraser, you basically have to use braided mainline because you get caught up on the rocks a lot and some of them are sharp. Obviously you still need a monofilament leader. With monofilament mainline you will be loosing a lot of gear....and besides the I find the stretch of the monofilament mainline is huge minus when it comes to the technique of flossing. I have an C4 reel specifically set aside with braided line for Fraser flossing. Unfortunately as we all know with getting zero opportunities the last few years, it has been collecting dust.

As for fiver fishing the Chilliwack/Vedder, Chehalis, or Capilano...rivers like that.....braided line is a nightmare. I only use monofilament mainline and leader. As Jim said...with no stretch...it's easy to lose fish (and other problems he listed). Quite often in the Vedder you are hooking fish less than 20 feet in front of you. With Fraser flossing (especially springs), you can be casting a hundred feet...braided line is fine for that. Most importantly, you will land more fish in rivers like the Vedder with monofilament.
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Fish Assassin

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Re: braid line
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2024, 10:41:06 AM »

Braid on all my spinning rods. No problem
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leadbelly

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Re: braid line
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2024, 09:25:30 PM »

Im using braid now every year on my spinning reels, after decades of monofilament.

Smaller lb tests of braid caused me wind knots and breakage, thats one issue to be aware of otherwise its the thinner more sensitive more durable way to go imo.

And dont buy ALL the hype on mono leaders.  Ok I use flouro leaders most of the time for lures, twitching, bar fishing and float fishing with my spinning reels for salmon  ( old habits)  but I know those who twitch , use lures with no leader on braid and have no diminishment in hook ups or landings.




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