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Author Topic: split bamboo flyrod repair  (Read 1146 times)

keithr

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split bamboo flyrod repair
« on: January 12, 2006, 11:16:46 AM »

I was cleaning out our storeroom (man, what a mess!) and came across a split bamboo flyrod I forgot I had inherited from my father.  It seems to be in good condition, spare tip and all, except for the metal part at the butt of the rod where the reel mounts.  That part is loose--I can slide it right off the butt of the pole.  I'm temped to just put some Elmer's carpenters glue on it and jam it back on, but I figure if there is a "right" way to do it, someone here will know how.  Thanks.
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newsman

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Re: split bamboo flyrod repair
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2006, 12:29:46 PM »

Your plan will work but I think when it gets wet the part will come off again. Try a non water soluble glue if it is metal on metal solder it. As for the rest of the rod I would advise a refit before you use it. I have restore most of them had a perment bend which means the inner core is drying out. One I received in trade for repairing a british float rod, was strait as an arrow and looked to be in perfect shape. Wrong! The tip split from tip to ferral when I got the first fish on it. Examination revealed that the inner core was bone dry. Cane rods are much the same as wood boats you never want the seams or core to dry out.

Restore as follows. Strip all the wrapping guides and ferrals off your rod. then carefully sand of the finnish to the bake wood. Take a rod tube or plastic pipe seal one end. Pill the pipe with water and submerge your rod completely. Leave the rod soaking untill it is completely saturated but not to the point that the parts start seperating. Next lay the rod out flat to dry and straighten as best as possible any bends. When the outer shell has dried apply a good quality rod finnish to seal the moisture in the core. After the rod has been sealed replace the remaining parts and your rod should be as good as it was when it came of the store shelf and if cared for properly will remain that way for another 100 years or more. Over the years a cane rod will require many restorations but rarely wear out, most often they go out of use through neglect, abuse, or theft. In my collection I have some that are over 100 years old that still perform like they were made yesterday. 
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true brit

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Re: split bamboo flyrod repair
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2006, 06:15:06 PM »

hi newsman,as the owner of a few split cane(bamboo) rods i find your article fascinating.is this theory about inner core drying out etc.just your own observation as i have never heard of this before ?.always been led to believe that sets (bends)were as a result of uneven curing of rod sections.i will be very interested in any more info you have.as i have had sound looking rods snap like matchsticks.we were allways told old rods need carefull breaking in by waggling slowly then gradually building up to more serious bending.any info gratefully appreciated.
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keithr

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Re: split bamboo flyrod repair
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2006, 06:30:19 PM »

This rod has been through a bunch of dry seasons at our place in Mexico, so it is probably dry.  I'm thinking I will just not use it for a season or two in the northwest (oregon) and expect it will pick up a bunch of moisture on its own.  I don't think it was a bery expensive rod to begin with--not label or evidence of where it was made.

And thanks for the good and interesting information.
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newsman

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Re: split bamboo flyrod repair
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2006, 07:02:12 PM »

hi newsman,as the owner of a few split cane(bamboo) rods i find your article fascinating.is this theory about inner core drying out etc.just your own observation as i have never heard of this before ?.always been led to believe that sets (bends)were as a result of uneven curing of rod sections.i will be very interested in any more info you have.as i have had sound looking rods snap like matchsticks.we were allways told old rods need carefull breaking in by waggling slowly then gradually building up to more serious bending.any info gratefully appreciated.

I'm no expert mostly self taught through trial & error since I bought my first cane rod from a pawn broker back in 1988. When I start playing with cane I was on my own since in my neck of the woods they were a thing of myth and mystery; like a ghost from the past. Anyway I just drew on the lessons I had received from a guy down the street who taught me to repair my rods when I was a kid back in the 60's. As for your rods snapping like a match stick; classic case of a rod that is bone dry.
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newsman

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Re: split bamboo flyrod repair
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2006, 07:09:32 PM »

This rod has been through a bunch of dry seasons at our place in Mexico, so it is probably dry.  I'm thinking I will just not use it for a season or two in the northwest (oregon) and expect it will pick up a bunch of moisture on its own.  I don't think it was a bery expensive rod to begin with--not label or evidence of where it was made.

And thanks for the good and interesting information.

Good idea. the one thing I missed in my first post is to store your cane rods in a damp place so they don't dry out. As for your rod not having a lable, I would say it is a good indcation that it was custom made; the idea being since such a rod would be made to the owners specks, no notation on the rod would be needed. My 18 ft spey is the same.
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Till the next time, "keep your fly in the water!"