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Author Topic: Fraser Chum?  (Read 8932 times)

*Lil Fisherman*

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Fraser Chum?
« on: October 10, 2005, 11:53:56 PM »

I was hoping to go bar fishing for some chum because I know they put up a great fight;however, im not sure how good the fishing is for them and im not sure of the best way to fish.any helps appreciated.thnx  :)

*Lil Fisherman*

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2005, 01:18:38 PM »

And could anyone give me some instructions for how to use roe?thanks alot

Rodney

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2005, 02:11:12 PM »

Chum fishing in the Fraser should be good until the end of November. The best way in my opinion is to simply spincast for them like what you would do with pink salmon. The only difference is that you should increase your line strength to 10 or 12lb test. 8lb test will still be able to get you some fish but it is very tiring on your gear.

The spoons that I have had success with are usually the ones that are green or chartreuse. Pink or orange will also work at times.

Bottom fishing with roe will get you either coho or chum but it can be frustrating at times as there are other fish nibbling at your bait. Coho or chum takes are hard and quick, so if you are not setting the hook right away, they are usually long gone.

Fish during the incoming tide like what you have done with pinks. They usually start move in two hours before flood tide. Signs of chum salmon are easy to spot, surface rolls are very typical.

Right now the Fraser River water clarity is not ideal for spinning, but you should be able to fish with roe. Hopefully the water will clear up soon so we can have some good days of spincasting.

*Lil Fisherman*

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2005, 11:20:12 PM »

OKI,thnx Rod. Im gonna go out tomorow and hopefully catch some fishies ;D

Rodney

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2005, 01:15:31 AM »

Here's the roe setup for you, which should work well for coho, chum, bull trout, and just about anything else that likes to eat roe.



The length of the leader can be adjusted. From the three way swivel to the weight, I usually use about 2 feet of line. From the three-way swivel to the hook (leader), I use about 1 to 1.5 feet. For main and leader, I use either 12 or 10lb test. The thickness of the leader doesn't really matter, as the water clarity is so poor anyway.

When you cast, try not to cast too far. Cast just far enough to avoid the snags near the rip raps from shore. Most of the fish are caught near shore, not all the way in the middle of the channel. Have a rod holder so that your rod is placed parallel to the water surface. This makes detecting the bites and setting the hook much easier. Having the rod straight up (perpendicular) would give you a sore neck as you have to look up to watch the rod tip the whole time.

When you're bottom fishing with roe, it is not necessary to use a 10.5' drift rod. In fact, using such a long rod can slow down your hookset, resulting in fish loss. A shorter spinning rod between 6 and 8 feet is sufficient for this type of fishing. By having a lighter rod, you can even just hold the rod while sitting in your chair. This allows you to detect the bite immediately.

For the roe, secure it on the bait loop. You may also wish to use roe sacs (simply cut off a chunk of roe and tie it into a sac). A few years ago I watched Steelhead King tying up a roe sac that was almost the size of a golf ball and landed a large bull trout as a result.

Avoid using small hook, try using hooks around sizes 1/0 or 2/0. This allows you to make precise hooksets, as well as avoiding fish that you are not allowed to keep from swalloing your hook. Bull trout is well known for sucking down roe deeply.

Don't waste your time if you start getting small nibbles from coarse fish. Reel the roe in and recast to a new spot, otherwise you'll just be donating roe.

You are allowed to use two hooks on your line, but I prefer to use one so the use of roe is minimized. By having two hooks, you will not be able to set the hook precisely.

Know what you can keep. You can keep:

  • Two hatchery coho salmon
  • Four chinook salmon but only one can be over 50cm long
  • Four chum salmon
  • Four pink salmon

But, you can only keep four salmon in total in one day, not 14. :)

You must release all wild coho salmon, sockeye salmon, wild cutthroat trout, bull trout/dolly varden, wild steelhead.

Please go to this page if you do not know the difference between a hatchery and a wild coho salmon.

I think that's about it. If you want to read more, go to this section.

BwiBwi

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2005, 01:33:08 AM »

And you might want to add a spin-n-glow too. if clarity is bad.
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Rodney

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2005, 01:39:18 AM »

Spin n glow is rarely used down here because the flow isn't strong and consistent enough to create a good spin. The roe by itself creates a scent trail that is enough to lure in a fish to bite. That's why two hours before peak tide, or two hours after peak tide is good as the current carries the scent away from the roe. Spin n glow is usually used in the Chilliwack to Hope area as the water flow is constant, and it is usually effective when the water is clearer. This time of the year in the Fraser Valley, many will hook on a roe sac with the spin n glow on as well to entice a spring jack, coho or even steelhead.

BwiBwi

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2005, 01:44:50 AM »

True. spin-n-glow down here needs to be small and when tides change.
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Rodney

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2005, 01:56:19 AM »

No, the small spin n glows are mainly used in streams such as the Vedder River actually. They are either used in float fishing or bottom bouncing (not flossing, but American's driftfishing method). Very effective for steelhead.

Trust me, Tide current down here will not produce a consistent spin on the spin n glow. Too often I see many people complicate their rig, which only results in more tangles and less fish. ;)

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2005, 02:12:16 AM »

Damn and I actually took the time to make some spin-n-glow from wine corks. Oh well all's not lost. At least I got one piece of the puzzle when steelhead season comes. When's that anyways? Never caught one before.
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Ramstrong

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2005, 05:09:16 AM »

If there's any current at all, try plunking a kwikfish/flatfish type plug.  Chums can't stand them and destroy them any chance they get.
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*Lil Fisherman*

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2005, 04:58:01 PM »

If there's any current at all, try plunking a kwikfish/flatfish type plug. Chums can't stand them and destroy them any chance they get.
do you have any pics of what they look like,i might have some

Rodney

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2005, 05:00:59 PM »

*Lil Fisherman*, unless you have a boat, fishing with kwikfish/flatfish plugs do not work too well by shore fishing down here. They are more effective around Chilliwack/Hope area. Stick with roe, I think the next couple of weeks it will pick up.

While on the topic, I phoned Chris a couple hours ago and the first thing that came out from the other end was, "Fish... fighting fish.... hold on, here's Nick..."

They were barfishing today, and was successful with a variety of species. ;) A report and photos are coming soon tonight. ;) This is just a teaser. :)

*Lil Fisherman*

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2005, 05:09:13 PM »

Lol,haha ok ill be waiting ;D

Ramstrong

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Re: Fraser Chum?
« Reply #14 on: October 13, 2005, 06:26:14 PM »

I don't know if I necessarily agree Rodney.  The current up high is ripping.  Probablly better for a Tadpolly type plug.  If the current is between 1-3 mph, a Kwikfish will reign supreme.  You just need "Some" current.  I used to fish them in the tidal Columbia all the time, I can't see them not working in the tidal Fraser.  Plus it'll let you save your egg supply for more tableworthy fish. 

The top lure is how you'd want to rig it for the fraser.  You don't need a lot of wobble to catch fish, just make sure you've got a rattle kwikfish.  load it up with smelly jelly on the underside and let it work it's Chum/Chinook catching magic.
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