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Author Topic: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates  (Read 27826 times)

dereke

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #180 on: August 26, 2009, 08:05:29 AM »

 
If the pinks are running strong, whatever happened to the sockeyes? Don't they share the same migration route? ???
From the test set #'s I have seen it appears that they do. Although the pink numbers are through the roof and sockeye are just kind of steady.......over 150,000 pink have been counted at the blinkhorn area sets and only 20,000 sockeye. If the run size estimates are somewhat the same you would think the number might be close. I guess more sockeye could be running around the outside but the numbers out there show the same pattern in the San juan sets. :'( :'(
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DragonSpeed

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #181 on: August 26, 2009, 09:00:10 AM »

If the pinks are running strong, whatever happened to the sockeyes? Don't they share the same migration route? ???

Less desirable food species - less overall harvest?
Less time in the ocean - possibly better for their survival if something in the ocean is killing them?

My $0.02

Easywater

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #182 on: August 26, 2009, 10:00:57 AM »

Sockeye spend 2 years in the lake they spawned in then go out to sea & return 2 years later.
Pinks have a 2 year life cycle and head out to sea shortly after being spawned.

The 2 returning stocks migrated to sea in the same year but the time of the year when they move out to sea is different.

Sockeye move out to the ocean in the spring & summer of their 2nd year in the lake.
Pink fry migrate in late February, about 6 months after spawning.

Could there be more lice present in May to July instead of February?

A few other tidbits of info:

Upstream migration may be disrupted if adults encounter hydrocarbon concentration exceeding 1-10 parts per billion.

In the last 2 cycles, most of the Pinks have been travelling up the North Arm of the Fraser instead of the normal South Arm.
(90% in 2007, 70% in 2005)

Could this be an indication that the South Arm is more polluted?

In the early 1920s (or 1913 depending on where you look), a major landslide at Hell's Gate, a treacherous obstacle on the Fraser River, prevented virtually all pink salmon from migrating to their short spawning streams. Since then, pink salmon have returned in catchable numbers only in odd-numbered years, swinging south around Vancouver Island on their approach from the open Pacific.

An attempt was made by DFO to have Pinks return to Jones Creek in the 1960's but it was not successful.

Someone told me that seals are not interested in Pinks.
They only go after female Sockeye and only eat the bellies - where the roe is stored.

There is an incredible amount of information on all salmon at this link:
http://books.google.ca/books?id=I_S0xCME0CYC&pg=PA137&lpg=PA137&dq=%2Bmigration+%2B%22pink+salmon%22&source=bl&ots=_uzzuH3hhY&sig=rLsf_J1G4367pir8Z_oy6c6V-SM&hl=en&ei=cmKVStumCJPWlAfE0fyvDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4#v=onepage&q=%2Bmigration%20%2B%22pink%20salmon%22&f=false

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marmot

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #183 on: August 26, 2009, 12:07:03 PM »

Yeah....seals hate pinks  :D

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Rodney

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #184 on: August 26, 2009, 01:38:29 PM »

In the last 2 cycles, most of the Pinks have been travelling up the North Arm of the Fraser instead of the normal South Arm.
(90% in 2007, 70% in 2005)

Could this be an indication that the South Arm is more polluted?

Where are those percentages from?

In the early 1920s (or 1913 depending on where you look), a major landslide at Hell's Gate, a treacherous obstacle on the Fraser River, prevented virtually all pink salmon from migrating to their short spawning streams. Since then, pink salmon have returned in catchable numbers only in odd-numbered years, swinging south around Vancouver Island on their approach from the open Pacific.

An attempt was made by DFO to have Pinks return to Jones Creek in the 1960's but it was not successful.

That's not correct. While the landslide created a geographical barrier for pink salmon that spawn in the Mid Fraser River, it does not explain the dominance of the odd year runs. For several reasons:

The Lower Fraser River, downstream from the landslide, makes up most of the spawning habitat for pink salmon.
The difference in odd and even year runs is a result of the two-year life cycle.
The odd year dominance is not limited to the Fraser River population, but also many other systems in Southern BC.

Salmon run size is cyclical. While human impact has a large contribution in the health of a population, it fluctuates naturally due to a number of biotic (predation, food availability) and abiotic (climate, ocean current) factors throughout their life cycle. It maybe low one cycle, then high on the next, it's not always a grim downward trend. A good example is the difference between the 1999 (lowest) and 2001 (highest) pink salmon runs.

The difference between run sizes of pink and sockeye salmon is influenced by many factors. First of all, any commercially important fish species like sockeye salmon have been experiencing population declining for obvious reasons. Once sockeye salmon are gone, pink salmon will experience the same trend as there will still be a demand for fresh seafood. This downgrade of harvestable commercial species is seen everywhere on this planet, such as shifting from cod and flatfish to less desirable species like rays and shark.

Interior salmon species are more at risk than coastal salmon species. The more interior the natal streams are (early Fraser River chinook salmon, early Stuart sockeye salmon), the more threatened they are due to travel distance for both adult spawners and outmigrating juveniles. Pink salmon are generally coastal spawners, travel distance for juvenile from stream before undergoing smoltification is short, therefore mortality is much lower.

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #185 on: August 26, 2009, 01:51:48 PM »

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Wednesday, August 26 to discuss fisheries management plans for the harvest of pink salmon.

At the meeting today the run size estimates of 175,000 Early Summer-run, 650,000 Summer-run, 60,000 Birkenhead, and 450,000 True Late-run sockeye were unchanged. Present assessments indicate that Fraser River pink salmon are tracking abundance levels exceeding their 75% probability level forecast of 12,490,000 fish.

The Panel announced the following regulations for Panel Area waters directed at the harvest of pink salmon:

CANADIAN FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Remain closed to fishing.

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

TREATY INDIAN FISHERY:

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: Open to net fishing from 5:00 a.m., Friday, August 28, 2009 to 8:00 a.m. Saturday, August 29, 2009. All sockeye caught are for ceremonial and subsistence use only.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: As previously announced, open to drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Wednesday, August 26, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Saturday, August 29, 2009. All sockeye caught are for ceremonial and subsistence use only.

NON INDIAN FISHERY:

Area 7: Open to purse seines for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Thursday, August 27, 2009.

Area 7: Open to gillnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Thursday, August 27, 2009.

Area 7A: Open to purse seines for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 3:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., Thursday, August 27, 2009.

Area 7: Open to gillnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 3:00 p.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Thursday, August 27, 2009.

Areas 7 and 7A: As previously announced, open to reefnets for pink salmon with nonretention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Wednesday, August 26, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Thursday, August 27, 2009; and from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, August 28, 2009.

(Note: U. S. Non-Treaty fishers should check the U.S. hotline and WDFW regulations before fishing as there are additional State of Washington regulations, including time restrictions that may be in effect).

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on August 28, 2009.

Easywater

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #186 on: August 26, 2009, 03:19:26 PM »

Darn, I started a long post then my connection crapped out for some reason.

I got the Hell's Gate info from here: http://www.bcadventures.com/adventure/angling/protalk/reid/pinksalmon.phtml

In the early 1920s, a major landslide at Hell's Gate , a treacherous obstacle on the Fraser River, prevented virtually all pink salmon from migrating to their short spawning streams. Since then, pink salmon have returned in catchable numbers only in odd-numbered years, swinging south around Vancouver Island on their approach from the open Pacific. In mid-island waters, pink return in both even- and odd-numbered years, while on the northern coast of British Columbia, pink return to short coastal streams in even-numbered years.

The ratio of North Arm to South Arm migration was told to me by a very knowledgable fisherman.
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Rodney

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #187 on: August 26, 2009, 03:32:00 PM »

Darn, I started a long post then my connection crapped out for some reason.

I got the Hell's Gate info from here: http://www.bcadventures.com/adventure/angling/protalk/reid/pinksalmon.phtml

In the early 1920s, a major landslide at Hell's Gate , a treacherous obstacle on the Fraser River, prevented virtually all pink salmon from migrating to their short spawning streams. Since then, pink salmon have returned in catchable numbers only in odd-numbered years, swinging south around Vancouver Island on their approach from the open Pacific. In mid-island waters, pink return in both even- and odd-numbered years, while on the northern coast of British Columbia, pink return to short coastal streams in even-numbered years.

The first part of that paragraph is correct as I mentioned in the previous post, but it's not the reason that resulted in the dominance of odd and even year pink salmon runs across BC. My understanding is that the trend is the product of a much longer process than just in the last century.

The ratio of North Arm to South Arm migration was told to me by a very knowledgable fisherman.

Ah, I thought maybe there was some sampling data that I was not aware of. It's based on angler observation then. No disrespect, knowledgable or not, observation by anglers has some merit but is not accurate enough to determine a trend conclusively because the observations are done inconsistently (what's going on at South Arm while he's at watching at North Arm?). I actually have seen the complete opposite in the past 7 seasons, that South Arm receives the bulk of the run while North Arm sees fewer fish travelling through. South Arm tends to get one mass migration in a short period of time (first two weeks of September) while North Arm consistently has fish moving in during every incoming tide from early August until late September.

Rodney

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #188 on: August 28, 2009, 09:32:17 PM »

Friday, August 28, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, August 28 to review stock assessment data on the Fraser sockeye and pink salmon runs and discuss fisheries management plans for the harvest of pink salmon.

The marine migration of Fraser sockeye has been at low abundance levels over the past several days, while the marine migration of Fraser River pink salmon through the assessment areas has been increasing.

At the meeting today the run size estimates of 175,000 Early Summer-run, 650,000 Summer-run, and 60,000 Birkenhead sockeye were unchanged. The run size estimate of True Late-run sockeye was reduced from 450,000 to 400,000 fish. Present assessments indicate that Fraser River pink salmon are tracking abundance levels near or exceeding their 50% probability level forecast of 17,535,000 fish.

Fraser River environmental conditions are currently satisfactory for the migration of Fraser River sockeye and pink salmon.

The Panel announced the following regulations for Panel Area waters directed at the harvest of pink salmon:

CANADIAN FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Area 18-4: Opens for Area H troll ITQ fishery for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon 12:01 a.m. Sunday, August 30, 2009 until further notice (Please refer to DFO Fishery Notice for further details).

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

TREATY INDIAN FISHERY:

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: As previously announced, open to net fishing from 5:00 a.m., Friday, August 28, 2009 to 8:00 a.m. Saturday, August 29, 2009.

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: Open to net fishing from 5:00 a.m., Sunday, August 30, 2009 to 8:00 a.m. Monday, August 31, 2009 and from 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, September 1, 2009 to 8:00 a.m. Wednesday, September 2, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: As previously announced, open to drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Wednesday, August 26, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Saturday, August 29, 2009. Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: Extended for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Saturday, August 29, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Wednesday, September 2, 2009.

NON INDIAN FISHERY:

Area 7 and 7A: Open to purse seines for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Saturday, August 29, 2009; and 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday, August 31, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Area 7 and 7A: Open to gillnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight) Saturday, August 29, 2009; and 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Monday, August 31, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 7 and 7A: As previously announced, open to reefnets for pink salmon with nonretention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Wednesday, August 26, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Thursday, August 27, 2009; and from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, August 28, 2009.

Areas 7 and 7A: Open to reefnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Saturday, August 30, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Sunday, August 31, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday, August 31; and from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 1, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

(Note: U. S. Non-Treaty fishers should check the U.S. hotline and WDFW regulations before fishing as there are additional State of Washington regulations, including time restrictions that may be in effect).

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on Tuesday, September 1, 2009.

Rodney

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #189 on: September 02, 2009, 01:14:39 AM »

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Tuesday, September 1 to review stock assessment data on the Fraser sockeye and pink salmon runs and discuss fisheries management plans for the harvest of pink salmon.

The marine migration of Fraser sockeye has been at low abundance levels over the past several days, while the migration of Fraser River pink salmon through the marine approach routes has been strong over the past week.

At the meeting today the run size estimates of 175,000 Early Summer-run, 650,000 Summer-run, 60,000 Birkenhead; and 400,000 True Late-run sockeye were unchanged. There is still considerable variability in run size assessments of Fraser River pink salmon since their peak migration timing through the marine approach routes is not yet known. However, there has been a large assessed abundance of Fraser pinks that have migrated through Johnstone Strait and Juan de Fuca Strait over the past week. At the meeting today, the Panel approved the 50% probability level forecast for Fraser River pink salmon of 17,535,000 fish for fisheries planning purposes. Fraser River environmental conditions are currently satisfactory for the migration of Fraser River sockeye and pink salmon. However, the discharge of the Fraser River is tracking about 34% below average and the water temperature at Qualark Creek on August 31 was 17.9 oC which is 1.6 oC above average for this date.

The Panel announced the following regulations for Panel Area waters directed at the harvest of pink salmon:

CANADIAN FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Area 18-4: As previously announced, open for Area H troll ITQ fishery for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon until further notice (Please refer to DFO Fishery Notice for further details).

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

TREATY INDIAN FISHERY:

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: As previously announced, open to net fishing from 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, September 1, 2009 to 8:00 a.m. Wednesday, September 2, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: Extended for net fishing from 8:00 a.m., Wednesday, September 2, 2009 through 11:00 a.m., Saturday, September 5, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: As previously announced, open for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Saturday, August 29, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Wednesday, September 2, 2009.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: Extended for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Wednesday, September 2, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Saturday, September 5, 2009.

NON INDIAN FISHERY:

Area 7 and 7A: Open to purse seines for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Thursday, September 3, 2009; and 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, September 4, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Area 7 and 7A: Open to gillnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 10:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight) Thursday, September 3, 2009; and 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Friday, September 4, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 7 and 7A: As previously announced, open to reefnets for pink salmon with nonretention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 1, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 7 and 7A: Open to reefnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Wednesday, September 2, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Thursday, September 3, 2009; and 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, September 4, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

(Note: U. S. Non-Treaty fishers should check the U.S. hotline and WDFW regulations before fishing as there are additional State of Washington regulations, including time restrictions that may be in effect).

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on Friday, September 4, 2009.

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #190 on: September 02, 2009, 10:12:23 AM »

This may help with the discussion about why pinks haven't been affected (yet) as much as sockeye.

First, the pinks that are returning this fall went to sea in 2008, not in 2007 with this years' sockeye.  But second, after nine years of studying this it is my strong impression that our wild salmon runs now succeed or fail based on what the fish farmers are doing.  In general, the fish farmers are de-lousing their fish very early in the year to prevent public reaction to the lice infections on young pink salmon.  But the drug they use (Slice) only works for 6-8 weeks.  This means that the pinks and chums that migrate past the fish farms in March - May have low infection rates, but the sockeye that run past the same fish farms in June are not protected as lice levels start to rise again once the drug wears off.  Watch the film on this site by Twyla Roscovich to see what the young sockeye looked like in 2008 around these farms.

I realize it is hard to accept that fish farms killed all the missing Fraser sockeye, but the picture we are getting coast wide certainly points to something very specific. Dr. Brian Riddell of the Pacific Salmon Foundation has been quoted saying he thinks these fish vanished between the river and the open ocean.  What about disease? There have been sweeping disease epidemics in salmon farms on this coast (Download IHNV_report_2003) and currently throughout the salmon farmed areas of the world (Global Spread of ISA)

source: http://alexandramorton.typepad.com/

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Rodney

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #191 on: September 04, 2009, 12:22:59 PM »

Friday, September 4, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, September 4 to review stock assessment data on the Fraser sockeye and pink salmon runs and discuss fisheries management plans for the harvest of pink salmon.

The migration of Fraser sockeye through Johnstone Strait and Juan de Fuca Strait is nearing completion while the marine migration of Fraser River pink salmon through these areas has been generally strong over the past two weeks. At the meeting today the run size estimates of 175,000 Early Summer-run, 650,000 Summer-run, 60,000 Birkenhead, 400,000 True Late-run sockeye, and 17,535,000 Fraser River pink salmon (which is their 50% probability level forecast) were unchanged.

On September 3 the Fraser River discharge at Hope was approximately 1,900 cms, which is about 30% lower than normal and slightly higher than the historic minimum discharge on this date. The water temperature of the Fraser River at Qualark Creek on September 3 was 19 0C, which is 3 0C higher than average for this date. Fraser River water temperatures are expected to decline as cooler, wetter weather is forecast for much of the Fraser River watershed. The Panel announced the following regulations for Panel Area waters directed at the harvest of pink salmon:

CANADIAN FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Area 18-4: As previously announced, open for Area H troll ITQ fishery for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon until further notice (Please refer to DFO Fishery Notice for further details).

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

TREATY INDIAN FISHERY:

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: As previously announced, open for net fishing from 8:00 a.m., Wednesday, September 2, 2009 through 11:00 a.m., Saturday, September 5, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: Extended for net fishing from 11:00 a.m., Saturday, September 5, 2009 through 11:00 a.m., Wednesday, September 9, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: As previously announced, open for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Wednesday, September 2, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Saturday, September 5, 2009.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: Extended for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Saturday, September 5, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Wednesday, September 9, 2009.

NON INDIAN FISHERY:

Area 7 and 7A: As previously announced, open to purse seines for pink salmon with nonretention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, September 4, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Area 7 and 7A: Open to purse seines for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday, September 7, 2009; and from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 8, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Area 7 and 7A: As previously announced, open to gillnets for pink salmon with nonretention of sockeye salmon from 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Friday, September 4, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Area 7 and 7A: Open to gillnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 10:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight) Monday, September 7, 2009; and 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Tuesday, September 8, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 7 and 7A: As previously announced, open to reefnets for pink salmon with nonretention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, September 4, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 7 and 7A: Open to reefnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Saturday, September 5, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Sunday, September 6, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday, September 7, 2009; and from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 8, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

(Note: U. S. Non-Treaty fishers should check the U.S. hotline and WDFW regulations before fishing as there are additional State of Washington regulations, including time restrictions that may be in effect).

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on Tuesday, September 8, 2009.

Rodney

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #192 on: September 11, 2009, 01:26:34 PM »

Friday, September 11, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, September 1 to review stock assessment data on the Fraser sockeye and pink salmon runs and discuss fisheries management plans for the harvest of pink salmon.

The migration of Fraser sockeye through Johnstone Strait and Juan de Fuca Strait is nearing completion while the marine migration of Fraser River pink salmon through these areas has been generally strong for the past few weeks. At the meeting today the run size estimates of 175,000 Early Summer-run, 650,000 Summer-run, 60,000 Birkenhead, 400,000 True Late-run sockeye. The run size estimate for Fraser River pink salmon was increased from the 50% probability level forecast of 17,535,000 fish to 19,500,000 fish.

On September 10 the Fraser River discharge at Hope was approximately 2,100 cms, which is about 17% lower than normal. The water temperature of the Fraser River at Qualark Creek on September 10 was 16.3 0C, which is 1.2 0C higher than average for this date. The Panel announced the following regulations for Panel Area waters directed at the harvest of pink salmon:

CANADIAN FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Area 18-4: Closes to Area H troll ITQ fishery for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon at 8:00 p.m., Friday, September 11, 2009 (Please refer to DFO Fishery Notice for further details).

Area 18-1, 18-4, and 18-11 and Area 29-1 to 6: Open to Area H troll ITQ fishery for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 12.01 a.m. Saturday, September 12, 2009 to 11:59 p.m., Friday, September 18, 2009. Fishery may close earlier, subject to by-catch concerns. (Please refer to DFO Fishery Notice for further details).

Area 29-1, 29-4, 29-6: Open to Area B purse seine ITQ fishery in waters deeper than 50 meters from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. daily on Sunday September 13, 2009, Monday, September 14, 2009, Tuesday, September 15 2009, and Wednesday, September 16 2009. Fishery may close earlier, subject to by-catch concerns. (Please refer to DFO Fishery Notice for further details).

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

4B, 5, and 6C: Relinquish regulatory control effective 12:01 a.m., Tuesday, September 15, 2009.

TREATY INDIAN FISHERY:

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: As previously announced, extended for net fishing from 11:00 a.m., Wednesday, September 9, 2009 through 11:00 a.m., Saturday, September 12, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: Extended for net fishing from 11:00 a.m., Saturday, September 12, 2009 to 9:00 p.m. Monday, September 14.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: As previously announced, extended for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Wednesday, September 9, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Saturday, September 12, 2009.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: Extended for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Saturday, September 12, 2009 to 11:59 (midnight), Monday, September 14, 2009.

NON INDIAN FISHERY:

Area 7 and 7A: The previously announced purse seine fishery for pink salmon that was to occur from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, September 11, 2009, has been cancelled.

Area 7 and 7A: The previously announced gillnet fishery for pink salmon that was to occur from 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Friday, September 11, 2009 has been cancelled. Areas 7 and 7A: The previously announced reefnet fishery for pink salmon that was to occur from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, September 11, 2009 has been cancelled.

(Note: U. S. Non-Treaty fishers should check the U.S. hotline and WDFW regulations before fishing as there are additional State of Washington regulations, including time restrictions that may be in effect).

This was the final scheduled in-season meeting of the Panel in 2009.

Rodney

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Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
« Reply #193 on: September 14, 2009, 03:16:38 PM »

Saturday, September 12, 2009

The Fraser River Panel announced the following regulations for United States Panel Area waters:

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: The previously announced net fishery that was scheduled to close at 9:00 p.m. Monday, September 14, 2009 will now close at 9:00 p.m., Sunday, September 13, 2009.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: As previously announced, open for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Saturday, September 12, 2009 to 11:59 (midnight), Monday, September 14, 2009.

This was the final scheduled in-season meeting of the Panel in 2009.