Fishing with Rod Discussion Forum

Fishing in British Columbia => Fishing-related Issues & News => Topic started by: Rodney on July 03, 2009, 04:36:20 AM

Title: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 03, 2009, 04:36:20 AM
Thursday, July 2, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Thursday, July 2 to receive an update on the migration of Early Stuart sockeye and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.

In-season assessments of Early Stuart sockeye indicate that they are currently tracking less than the 75% probability level forecast of abundance, which is 165,000 fish. However, a formal update of run size will not be available until after the peak of the run is observed passing marine areas (expected July 4). Migration conditions for sockeye entering the Fraser River are presently near average for the time of year. Fraser River discharge (at Hope) and water temperate at Qualark were 5400 cms and 13 °C respectively on July 1, which are slightly below normal for this date. Fraser River discharge levels and water temperatures will be monitored closely to determine if specific management actions are required during the in-river migratory period to help achieve sockeye escapement goals.

All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on July 7, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 07, 2009, 01:45:20 PM
Tuesday, July 7, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Tuesday, July 7 to receive an update on the migration of

Early Stuart sockeye and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed. In-season assessments of Early Stuart sockeye abundance are still variable; however they are currently tracking near the 75% probability level forecast of 165,000 fish. An estimate of Early Stuart run size will be provided at the next Panel meeting. Migration conditions for sockeye entering the Fraser River are presently satisfactory. The discharge of the Fraser River at Hope was 4,500 cms on July 6, which is below average for this date. The water temperate of the Fraser River at Qualark was 15 °C, which near average for this date. Fraser River discharge levels and water temperatures will be monitored closely to determine if specific management actions are required during the in-river migratory period to help achieve sockeye escapement goals.

All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on July 10, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 10, 2009, 02:38:03 PM
Friday, July 10, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, July 10 to receive an update on the migration of Early Stuart sockeye and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.

At the meeting today, the Fraser River Panel approved a decrease in the run size estimate of Early Stuart sockeye from their 75% probability level forecast of abundance of 165,000 fish to 140,000 fish. The 50% migration timing of Early Stuart sockeye through Area 20 is estimated to be June 29, which is five days earlier than the pre-season forecast. Assessments of Early Summer-run sockeye abundance should be available later in July after their peak migration through marine areas has occurred.

Migration conditions for sockeye entering the Fraser River are presently satisfactory. On July 9 the discharge of the Fraser River at Hope was approximately 4,600 cms, which is approximately 23% lower than average for this date. The water temperature of the Fraser River at Qualark Creek on July 9 was 15.8 0C, which is 0.4 0C higher than average for this date. Fraser River discharge levels and water temperatures will be monitored closely to determine if specific management actions are required during the in-river migratory period to help achieve sockeye escapement goals.

All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

Please be advised that the telephone number for U.S. Non-Indian fishing schedules available through the National Marine Fisheries Service’s Hotline in Seattle has been changed to 1-800-662-9825.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on July 14, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 14, 2009, 01:22:03 PM
Tuesday, July 14, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Tuesday, July 14 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.

Test fishing catches of sockeye in Johnstone Strait and Juan de Fuca Strait as well in the Fraser River indicate low migration of Fraser River sockeye over the past several days. At the meeting today, the run size estimate of 140,000 Early Stuart sockeye was unchanged; however, present assessments suggest that the return will likely be lower than this. The migration of Early Summer-run sockeye through marine assessment areas has also been lower than expected to-date. Migration conditions for sockeye entering the Fraser River are presently satisfactory. On July 13 the Fraser River discharge at Hope was approximately 4,850 cms, which is approximately 15% lower than normal, while the water temperature at Qualark Creek was 16.2 0C, which is 0.5C higher than average for this date.

All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

Please be advised that the telephone number for U.S. Non-Indian fishing schedules available through the National Marine Fisheries Service’s Hotline in Seattle has been changed to 1-800-662-9825.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on July 17, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Richmond on July 15, 2009, 10:16:41 AM
my Native friends are doing unreal for this time of the year, they are getting 60-80 numbers, and this is just the begining. last year they were getting 10s and 20s.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 15, 2009, 10:33:49 AM
So far, these updates have been focusing on the Early Stuart run, which is entering through the Lower Fraser River right now. The Early Stuart run does not provide an opening opportunity for all sectors due to its small and fragile run size, so this informatio is not very relevant to those who are interested in a recreational opening for sockeye salmon. The runs that provides possible harvest opportunity are the summer runs, which will be arriving in a couple of weeks from now. The status of those runs will be available in the upcoming updates.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Easywater on July 15, 2009, 04:40:59 PM
That notice also says that there will probably be a First Nations opening shortly after July 29th, after the Stuart run is finished.

Expect a rec opening shortly after that.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: chris gadsden on July 17, 2009, 01:23:47 PM
That notice also says that there will probably be a First Nations opening shortly after July 29th, after the Stuart run is finished.

Expect a rec opening shortly after that.

Maybe not.

Test fishing catches of sockeye in Johnstone Strait and Juan de Fuca Strait as well in the Fraser River indicate low migration of Fraser River sockeye over the past several days. At the meeting today, the run size estimate of 140,000 Early Stuart sockeye was unchanged; however, present assessments suggest that the return will likely be lower than this. The migration of Early Summer-run sockeye through marine assessment areas has also been lower than expected to-date. Migration conditions for sockeye entering the Fraser  River are presently satisfactory. On July 13 the Fraser River discharge at Hope was approximately 4,850 cms, which is approximately 15% lower than normal, while the water temperature at Qualark Creek was 16.2 0C, which is 0.5C higher than average for this date.

All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 17, 2009, 02:51:11 PM
Friday, July 17, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, July 17 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.

Sockeye catches in marine and Fraser River test fisheries thus far this season indicate that the migration of sockeye has been low. The marine migration of Early Stuart sockeye is nearly complete. At the meeting today, the Fraser River Panel decreased the run size estimate for Early Stuart sockeye from 140,000 fish to 110,000 fish. Early Summer-run sockeye will be continuing to enter the marine assessment areas over the next few weeks. The 50% probability level forecast for these sockeye is 739,000 fish. The migration of Early Summer-run sockeye through marine assessment areas has been considerably lower than expected to-date.

Migration conditions for sockeye entering the Fraser River are presently satisfactory. However, Fraser River water temperatures are forecast to reach approximately 19 0C over the next ten days. Water temperatures exceeding 19 0C may stress sockeye and slow their upstream migration.

All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

Please be advised that the telephone number for U.S. Non-Indian fishing schedules available through the National Marine Fisheries Service’s Hotline in Seattle has been changed to 1-800-662-9825.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on July 21, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 21, 2009, 02:03:31 PM
Tuesday, July 21, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Tuesday, July 21 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.

Test fishing catches of Fraser River sockeye in marine areas have increased slightly in recent days. However, the migration of Fraser River sockeye through marine assessment areas todate is lower than expected. The current run size estimate for Early Stuart sockeye of 110,000 fish may be decreased at a future Panel meeting after further data assessments are conducted. It is too early to provide an update on the run size of Early Summer-run sockeye; however current abundance assessments indicate that they are tracking lower than forecast if there timing is near average.

Migration conditions for sockeye entering the Fraser River are presently satisfactory. However, Fraser River water temperatures are forecast to exceed 19 0C within a week, which may adversely impact the upstream migration of Fraser River sockeye.

All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

Please be advised that the telephone number for U.S. Non-Indian fishing schedules available through the National Marine Fisheries Service’s Hotline in Seattle has been changed to 1-800-662-9825.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on July 23, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: rahmanjoy on July 21, 2009, 08:07:32 PM
Any chance it could be open 1st week of august?? ;D
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Easywater on July 22, 2009, 09:59:04 AM
Test fisheries at the south end of Vancouver Island are showing massive numbers of Sockeye coming in.

Area 20 - San Juan - showing between 200 and 250 Sockeye caught per day.
Numbers for Area 20 in 2006 (the last good year) were around 50 to 150 for the same dates.

In the US, Area 7 only has one date (July 20) with a count of 175 Sockeye but yesterday's combined count was over 600!
In 2006, number for US Area 7 were around 100 to 250 for the same time.

Most of the Sockeye come in around the bottom of Vancouver Island so the east side of VI counts will be low.

There were over 5000 Sockeye caught in the Fraser by First Nations over the weekend.


Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 23, 2009, 11:04:17 AM
Thursday, July 23, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Thursday, July 23 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye runs.

The migration of Fraser River sockeye through marine assessment areas continues to be lower than expected. The current run size estimate for Early Stuart sockeye of 110,000 fish may be decreased at a future Panel meeting after further data assessments are conducted. The migration of Early Summer-run sockeye through the marine approach routes is currently tracking much lower than forecast assuming that their migration timing is near average.

All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on July 24, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: mattyo on July 23, 2009, 07:53:26 PM
I'm wondering why they have planned a meeting two days in a row?? Does this seem strange to anyone?
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: troutbreath on July 23, 2009, 09:54:36 PM
"Does this seem strange to anyone?"

No those chowderhounds probably found a good special on the menu Friday. All expenses paid.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Easywater on July 24, 2009, 08:09:26 AM
50/50 chance of an opening tomorrow.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: goblin59 on July 24, 2009, 08:11:38 AM
According the the Pacific Salmon Commission website, there has only been 1 day of test sets in Area 20.... 5 sets, 16 socks. If you compare this years test sets to last, the numbers are lower!
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: goblin59 on July 24, 2009, 08:36:19 AM
I was referring to area 20 seine site 1, fished one day so far this year, July 22nd., 5 sets, 16 sockeye. Last year on the same day they did 6 sets and caught 1344 fish!! I'd say 0% chance of them opening it tomorrow.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: DOdGER on July 24, 2009, 09:22:48 AM
Hi,

long time lurker, first time poster  ;).

They meet on Fridays to make adjustments to the regs. I think 50/50 opening tomorrow is pretty unlikely considering the lower numbers and the amount of early run still in the river. I think more likely 50/50 chance of an opening next weekend. Also remember that when the open the rec fishery, they will open the gillnetters in the river, so that will ruin the first 3 days of fishing  :'(. I will be out there tomorrow fishing Springs, but 2 socks would be a nice surprise.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: big ben on July 24, 2009, 01:56:49 PM
U know wut i think they will open it on the long weekend ... and i have many theories for this thinking..
1.) Keep all the anglers happy..for opening sockeye
2.)keep the tackle shops happy...all the people wanting to get tackle
3.) wont be any fish caught... not much fish out there... all the netters
i have been fishing this whole week and have caught 3 sockeye and 3 springs
fishin is pretty good right now but hope fully they open it for sockeye
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: dennyman on July 24, 2009, 02:31:14 PM
If the numbers are not there keep it closed. Remember this year and next year were supposed to be  projected big runs for Sockeye. If the forecast is way off it paints a pretty dismal picture for the future of Salmon in this province.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: ynot on July 24, 2009, 03:31:04 PM
The main run of summers 6-7 million fish dont show in the test fishery in big numbers untill 2nd week of aug. the early summer run should be out there now but not looking to good yet.so its wait and see. long weekend might be open depending on test results next week.i would rather wait for the bigger run as when its slow the river gets very crowded and lots of bad tempered fishers.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: ynot on July 24, 2009, 05:31:00 PM
just saw the latest from dfo bleak reading, we might not get any openings the way its going.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 24, 2009, 07:12:20 PM
Friday, July 24, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, July 24 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.

The abundance of Fraser River sockeye migrating through marine assessment areas is still tracking below pre-season expectations. The proportion of four year old Fraser sockeye returning thus far this season continues to be lower than expected, which is of concern since they were expected to dominate the return of Fraser sockeye. At the meeting today, the run size estimate for Early Stuart sockeye was decreased from 110,000 fish to 85,000 fish. Estimates of Early Summer-run sockeye run size are still uncertain; however they suggest that the return is considerably lower than the pre-season forecast. Consequently, for fisheries planning purposes the Panel adopted the 90% probability level forecast of 264,000 Early Summer-run sockeye.

On July 23 the Fraser River discharge at Hope was approximately 4,300 cms, which is lower than normal, while the water temperature at Qualark Creek was 18.0 0C, which is higher than average for this date. Fraser River water temperatures are forecast to reach almost 21 0C by August 1. Water temperatures exceeding 20 0C may cause high pre-spawning mortality of Fraser River sockeye.

All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on July 27 (if warranted by stock assessment information) or July 28, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: roeman on July 24, 2009, 09:11:43 PM
165000 to 140000 to 110000 to 85000
Why not just say they have new idea what is coming or when and save all the BS.
Hope they don't get paid to have these meetings, because they obviously mean nothing..
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Geff_t on July 24, 2009, 09:34:57 PM
What I find sad is that DFO does nothing about the 24/7 netting going on from Chilliwack to Hope.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: sagerod on July 25, 2009, 02:52:33 PM


Its the same old BS every year. Its sad to see the netting that goes on.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 25, 2009, 03:03:17 PM
Fisheries and Oceans Canada officers patrol the Fraser River on a regular basis, both days and nights, and attend calls whenever possible. Unauthorized nets are seized (more than you are assuming) each year. Attend a SFAC meeting where each season's enforcement is summarized to gain a better understanding what is being done to tackle poaching in ALL sectors instead of making assumptions that Fisheries and Oceans Canada does nothing. The only fault that Fisheries and Oceans Canada has in this case is not doing more on outreaching and improving their public relation, instead they choose to utilize the limited amount of money that they have on where the problems are.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Funeral Of Hearts on July 25, 2009, 06:51:58 PM
Are there any other repercussions other than taking thier nets away?
A slap on the wrist, or a nominal fine is not going to cut it. It is like a child disobeying thier parents. If boundaries are not set, and enforced with consequences then they will continue to push the boundaries and take the finger shake from the parent who says "don't do it again little Johnny..."
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Davis on July 25, 2009, 08:35:39 PM
One day they will clean up the rif raff that chose to disobey the law,and I can't wait till it happens.Soon I hope.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: bbronswyk2000 on July 27, 2009, 08:10:46 AM
Looks like no sockeye opening for the long weekend. They just had a blurb on the morning news about it saying that only 30,000 fish have come through so far.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Shooter on July 27, 2009, 08:45:40 AM
just curious... what do they base their estimate of returning fish on?  is it based on the previous cycle return numbers or is there some other equation that they use to estimate returning numbers? 
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Stratocaster on July 27, 2009, 09:33:40 AM
For preliminary estimates (before the season starts).  They use the historical cycle year info of the stocks that make up the run for this year, the number of returning adults in the brood year of this run, and the number of outmigrating smolts applicable to this run.  From there they calculate a probability scale i.e. 50% chance of x number returning.  The higher the % the more conservative the numbers.

When the season begins, they use test fishery data to estimate the actual numbers returning.  I've always wondered about how accurate this approach is.  In some states in the US, fishing is not allowed until they get a certain number of fish onto the spawning grounds or a certain number pass the counters.

Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: pepsitrev on July 27, 2009, 09:46:29 AM
 ??? looks like they are not going to let us on the river for sockeye on the long weekend like said in this post a while ago. heard on global not enough fish are comming in yet and with all the hot weather who knows what is going to happen  but i'm sure chris and rod will keep us up to date on any important issues for sure. tight lines and sharp hooks to all. cheers
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: goblin59 on July 27, 2009, 09:48:30 AM
The numbers in the test fisheries don't seem to be improving at all. Sad to say that for the good of the future they would be better off keeping it closed, especially with the extremely warm water temperatures that the Fraser is going to have very soon.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: silverslab on July 27, 2009, 12:00:25 PM
the fraser water seems already to be warmer
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: warlo_527 on July 27, 2009, 02:38:07 PM
Looking at the 2005 season...the summer run came 2 weeks later than average...which was Aug 22 through area 20 waters. That was the year we had the opening on the Fraser in early September. So let's hope that they are coming in a bit late. But I agree that I think the run will be much lower than expected. But the water will not be getting any colder and then the more endangered late run sockeyes will be in the river...so it doesn't look great.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: BigFisher on July 27, 2009, 04:01:02 PM
Looking at the 2005 season...the summer run came 2 weeks later than average...which was Aug 22 through area 20 waters. That was the year we had the opening on the Fraser in early September. So let's hope that they are coming in a bit late. But I agree that I think the run will be much lower than expected. But the water will not be getting any colder and then the more endangered late run sockeyes will be in the river...so it doesn't look great.

Wasnt that september opening 3 years ago, 2006?
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: hotrod on July 27, 2009, 04:20:00 PM
2006 opening was for the month of august til sept 5! Was a good year!
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: jetboatjim on July 27, 2009, 04:39:56 PM
I wonder if the natives are impacting the very few of these sockeye in the river now. gill nets dont discriminate between sockeye and chinook
I'm sure they release the sockeye they catch though.... ::)
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: PistolPete on July 27, 2009, 05:40:30 PM
Already had offers to buy fish (sockeye) about a month ago. They let them go right to the cooler............
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Steelhawk on July 28, 2009, 01:28:13 PM
Like I mention in the other thread in the 'Fishing News/issue' section, the Port Alberni sockeye run was reported to be stronger than usual causing natives to dump excess unsold fish. The ocean conditions should not have hurt the Fraser run then. What else can contribute to such a drastic reduction in the Fraser return? You and I know the answer - the fish stocks were illiegally over-fished/poached and sold a few ago for big $$$ all along the Fraser. Greed is the main culprit here. I still remember the post Chris made in which he revealed a helicopter trip counting more than 700 nets set all along the lower Fraser. How can any fish stock survive that level of harvest. I hope that the real reason is that the fish is late like before. Otherwise the natives should have some soul searching to do how they had wiped out the salmon their forefathers have handed down to them to enjoy and to conserve as a show of their respect for the blessings of Heaven.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Geff_t on July 28, 2009, 01:40:49 PM
Like I mention in the other thread in the 'Fishing News/issue' section, the Port Alberni sockeye run was reported to be stronger than usual causing natives to dump excess unsold fish. The ocean conditions should not have hurt the Fraser run then. What else can contribute to such a drastic reduction in the Fraser return? You and I know the answer - the fish stocks were illiegally over-fished/poached and sold a few ago for big $$$ all along the Fraser. Greed is the main culprit here. I still remember the post Chris made in which he revealed a helicopter trip counting more than 700 nets set all along the lower Fraser. How can any fish stock survive that level of harvest. I hope that the real reason is that the fish is late like before. Otherwise the natives should have some soul searching to do how they had wiped out the salmon their forefathers have handed down to them to enjoy and to conserve as a show of their respect for the blessings of Heaven.

  Very well said steelhawk.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 28, 2009, 01:41:15 PM
Tuesday, July 28, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Tuesday, July 28 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.

The marine migration of Fraser River sockeye over the past several days continues to be much lower than expected. The run size estimate of 264,000 Early Summer-run sockeye was decreased to 150,000 fish at the meeting today. It is too early to provide an in-season run size estimate for Summer-run sockeye; however, similar to Early Summer-run sockeye, their abundance is currently tracking considerably lower than forecast unless their marine timing is later than expected.

On July 27 the Fraser River discharge at Hope was approximately 4,100 cms, which is 14% lower than average for this date, while the water temperature at Qualark Creek was 19.8 0C, which is 2.6 0C higher than average for this date. Fraser River water temperatures are forecast to reach 21.7 0C by August 5. If this forecasted water temperature occurs, it will be the highest Fraser River water temperature in the data-set spanning almost 100 years. Water temperatures exceeding 20 0C may cause high pre-spawning mortality of Fraser River sockeye. All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on July 31, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: dereke on July 28, 2009, 01:57:21 PM
Ouch!
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: troutbreath on July 28, 2009, 02:10:24 PM
The Sockeye will be poached before their poached!
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Geff_t on July 28, 2009, 02:18:11 PM
Yup we all know they will get them all. They will also use this an a excuse for over fishing. All that will be said is "they where going to die anyways" .
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: ynot on July 28, 2009, 02:21:46 PM
apart from the natives,in 2006 the commercial fleet went 1 million over their limit. of course the blame will be warm water in the river and other b.s.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 28, 2009, 02:32:48 PM
The downsize of the pre-season forecast has no relationship with harvest of their broods by different sectors, not that this would convince those who already have their mind set on who to blame.

Pre-season run size estimation is based on several factors - spawning escapement count, mortality at spawning stage due to warm water temperature, estimation of out-migrating of smolts, which are AFTER harvest has taken place. These numbers are used in the prediction model, which is developed from historic sockeye return data. Run size numbers are established at different probability level. The higher the probability, the lower the run size estimation is. The number released to the media is usually at the 50% level. For several years now, the actual run size has been lower than the estimation at 50% probability.

A certain of number of smolts go out, you expect a certain number of adults to return. It's not happening, because ocean condition (natural, artificial or both) has not been favourable for pacific salmon at their adult phase.

Anyway, back to the rhetorics instead of focusing on facts and solutions.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Geff_t on July 28, 2009, 02:38:37 PM
Well the only solution would be to close the harvest of all sockeye by all groups. Unfortunately this will only happen when they are all gone. Then it moves on to the other salmon until there is no more salmon left except for what is in the fish farms.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: searun17 on July 28, 2009, 02:47:16 PM
Ya know,truthfully,all the politics that encompass our sockeye fishery frankly are starting to get overly bothersome,when it really comes down to it how do we really know what the governments real agenda is regarding these fish,how accurate are the DFO counts?in my opinion not very at all,when was the last time and how often over the years have their estimates even come close,coincidence or maybe done for a reason?personally i don't for one minute trust the well being of our resources being taken care of by our government,i think there is to many behind the scenes agendas with the gov for these fish to ever have a legitimate  chance to reach the once prolific numbers we once were used to seeing.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: jetboatjim on July 28, 2009, 02:49:14 PM
2 factors that impact the sockeye, #1 is over fishing by the NATIVES , #2 sea lice.

So Rodney what do you feel is a good start to solving these problems?
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 28, 2009, 03:00:34 PM
time wasted again
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: searun17 on July 28, 2009, 03:09:19 PM
OK ,fact,for several years now we have watched the decline of our sockeye and coho,steelhead stocks  ,what is the solution?eliminate the sea lice problem , ,stop the over fishing and poaching, stop the gravel removal and degradation of our fish bearing streams,curtail urban sprawl,and I'm sure there are many other solutions to the problem but as i said in my previous post i don't trust our governments agenda ,it all comes down to big business and the all mighty dollar and this wont change the poor state of our fishery until there is full commitment from the gov and ALL user groups to do what is best for the resource.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: DragonSpeed on July 28, 2009, 03:27:52 PM
Tuesday, July 28, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Tuesday, July 28 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.
[...]

....Fraser River water temperatures are forecast to reach 21.7 0C by August 5. If this forecasted water temperature occurs, it will be the highest Fraser River water temperature in the data-set spanning almost 100 years.

[...]
Ouch.  :'(
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: goblin59 on July 28, 2009, 04:59:20 PM
In my opinion it's ocean conditions and sea lice from far too many fish farms all along the coast that are having the biggest impact on the sockeye stocks. Little can be done about ocean conditions, but certainly something can be done about the fish farms. I realize that industry won't be going away, but the need to move to closed pen farms must happen or before we know it the sockeye and other salmon will be gone.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Terry D on July 28, 2009, 08:18:06 PM
When all the salmon are gone, can we turn the Fraser into a carp fishery?  There'd be plenty of sport for us anglers then.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Robert_G on July 28, 2009, 08:39:48 PM
With the threat of the Fraser nearing 22 degrees, any other speculation is irrelevant.
The fish that do come up the river will be floating back down belly up.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Dave on July 28, 2009, 09:36:46 PM
22 ° C is indeed serious stuff to sockeye; all salmonids.  Those Early Stuarts that are now in the Nechako - Stuart system are experiencing temperatures typically 2 degrees warmer than the Fraser, possibly 24°...  that means a greater pre-spawning mortality and fish that do arrive on the spawning grounds are basically unable to spawn.
The early/summer run of sockeye is pretty much what is left of the once bountiful Fraser sockeye runs.  Some of these stocks, like ES, have always been on the edge, survival wise, as Hudson Bay Company documents show but the low water levels and increasing water temperatures now happening in the Fraser and tributaries put the much more abundant stocks like Horsefly, Mitchell and Chilko ( yeah, even Chilko) at risk.
 
If these temperatures continue during the summer migration (Quesnel, Chilko) I hope DFO and all user groups unite to curtail any fishing.

Hope for big rain in the interior, soon, to alleviate this potential risk.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Nai965 on July 28, 2009, 09:47:44 PM
Hi Everyone , I have been following FWR for about 8 yrs now. I have heard professional opinions to amateur ones. But it is this type of discussion which opens minds and hearts. My suggestion for fish farms is to build them inland , have canals bringing water to and  from the sea, not too far inland but not too close too. Have couple of dams or locks to prevent fish escaping and cross breeding or contaminating the wild stock.

I think this is being done in some countries. Just a suggestion,

Tks,
Raj

Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: hotrod on July 29, 2009, 07:07:00 AM
Hi Everyone , I have been following FWR for about 8 yrs now. I have heard professional opinions to amateur ones. But it is this type of discussion which opens minds and hearts. My suggestion for fish farms is to build them inland , have canals bringing water to and  from the sea, not too far inland but not too close too. Have couple of dams or locks to prevent fish escaping and cross breeding or contaminating the wild stock.

I think this is being done in some countries. Just a suggestion,

Tks,
Raj



They will all be gone soon! and the rebuilding will start!



 Hotrod
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: alwaysfishn on July 29, 2009, 12:39:25 PM
Quoted from an update sent out by Alexandra Morton:

"The downgrade of the Fraser sockeye is a warning we can choose to ignore or react to. Alaska is seeing huge sockeye returns and they do not allow Atlantic salmon to be penned on their salmon migration routes.  We can make many guesses as to what happened to our sockeye, but it does not make sense to ignore the one that has been researched and published and seen worldwide.  Commercial, sport and tourism operators are taking losses to protect our wild salmon and yet the fish farms just keep getting bigger and more numerous. 

There is something very wrong here and if we want our wild salmon we need to speak now or forever lose our fish.

Standing by,

Alexandra Morton"


You can buy sockeye salmon in Save-on stores but they are not BC caught sockeye. As I understand it they are Alaska caught sockeye.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: kosanin kosher salt on July 29, 2009, 04:36:02 PM
theyre saying 35million sockeye for bristol bay this year

theyve already harvested  24million  and you can buy at  0.75$  a pound  cheaper than pinks here
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Steelhawk on July 30, 2009, 02:23:28 AM
Looks like Palin know how to take care of her fish than us Canadians.  ;D
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on July 31, 2009, 01:50:38 PM
Friday, July 31, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, July 31 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.

Test fishing catches of sockeye from the marine approach areas indicate an increase in abundance relative to the previous week although abundance indicators are still far lower than pre-season expectations for this date. The run size estimate of 150,000 Early Summer-run sockeye was unchanged at the meeting today. Similar to Early Stuart and Early Summer-run sockeye, the return of Summer-run sockeye through marine assessment areas has been much lower than expected to-date. A run size estimate for Summer-run sockeye should be available next week near their expected peak migration date through marine assessment areas.

Migration conditions for sockeye entering the Fraser River have become adverse over the past week due to the sustained period of hot, dry weather and low discharge levels. On July 30 the water temperature of the Fraser River at Qualark Creek was 20.7 0C, which is 3.4 0C higher than average for this date. Water temperatures exceeding 20 0C may cause high pre-spawning mortality of Fraser River sockeye.

Due to the very low abundance of Fraser sockeye thus far this season, there have been no directed commercial fisheries for Fraser River sockeye. All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on August 4, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: mattyo on August 04, 2009, 05:47:25 PM
I don't want to start a debate with this but why are they still stringing test nets every day??? With the run sizes as low as this, maybe a better idea is to run nets every three days?
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Steelhawk on August 05, 2009, 03:25:01 PM
Perhaps they will do like before - open the fishery (if the # is slightly justified) so every one buys license, then close it with lightning speed.  ;D There is no refund like buying a concert ticket.  ;)
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 07, 2009, 12:20:48 PM
Friday, August 7, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, August 7 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.

Based on pre-season forecasts, the maximum daily Fraser sockeye migration through the
marine assessment areas was projected to be occurring now. However, test fishing catches over the past week indicate that the migration of Fraser sockeye through both the northern and southern approach routes continues to track far below expectations. The run size estimate for Early Summer-run sockeye of 150,000 fish was unchanged at the meeting today. Estimates of the run size of Summer-run sockeye are still highly uncertain because their peak migration timing through marine assessment areas is not yet known. Given the current assessment data and their expected marine timing, current estimates of Summer-run sockeye run size are considerably below their 90% probability level forecast of 2,858,000 fish and are less than those needed to provide harvestable surpluses. A more accurate assessment of the run size of Summer-run sockeye should be available next week. It is still early in the marine migration of most Late-run sockeye stocks. Assessments of Late-run sockeye abundance and marine timing will be provided over the next few weeks. The expected peak migration of Fraser River pink salmon through Juan de Fuca Strait is late August. Assessments of their migratory timing, stock composition and abundance will be conducted over the next several weeks.

Migration conditions for sockeye entering the Fraser River have been adverse for the past two weeks. On August 6 the Fraser River water temperature at Qualark Creek was 19.6 0C, which is 1.9 0C higher than average for this date. Water temperatures in this range may cause increased pre-spawning mortality of Fraser River sockeye. Due to cooler weather in the Fraser River watershed, water temperatures are forecast to decrease to 19.2 0C by August 15. Due to the low abundance of Fraser sockeye thus far this season, there have been no directed commercial fisheries for Fraser River sockeye. All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on August 11, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: dnibbles on August 07, 2009, 12:36:37 PM
Sockeye are now being observed holding in front of cold water tributaries in the Fraser canyon. These fish are as good as dead. Any stress impacts on sockeye at this time will effectively result in en-route mortality. this would include, but is not limited to: encounter in an 8" mesh chinook net, catch and release at the hands of sport fishermen, and harrassment by seals.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: sagerod on August 07, 2009, 12:58:48 PM
Hi

We been hooking sockeye on the fly. We noticed that most of the sockeye had open sore on them, three or four on either side of the fish. Any thought on what this could be.

Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: dennyman on August 07, 2009, 01:36:51 PM
If you look at studies that have  been done on the river system, it is a fungal infection. Add to that with the warm water, sockeye become more prone to a kidney disease that can prematurely kill them. As has been mentioned to death on sockeye related threads, sporties should try and minimize contact with sockeye as the unfavourable water conditions is not going to allow a lot of them to make it to their spawning grounds.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: chris gadsden on August 08, 2009, 09:44:13 PM
From CKNW news

The prospects for sockeye salmon fishing in B.C. are so bad this year that some fishermen have already given up and gone home.

The pre-season forecast for the Fraser River sockeye run was more than eight million fish, but that's been substantially downgraded.

The Pacific Salmon Commission was to have released a new estimate of numbers this week, but that's been delayed until next
Tuesday because of uncertainty over the data collected so far.

In the meantime, federal fisheries area manager Barry Rosenberger says all current sockeye fishing closures remain in effect.

Out of town fishermen left the Prince Rupert area on the north coast this week when it became evident there would be no sockeye season this year, or if there is one, it will be small.
(CHNL)
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 10, 2009, 03:42:44 PM
A fishery notice will be issued by DFO tomorrow for no fishing for sockeye salmon starting on Wednesday. Please note that this is different to no retention for sockeye salmon. By issuing this implementation, DFO wishes to see anglers reduce catching and release sockeye salmon significantly while targeting chinook, pink and chum salmon, meaning adopting alternative fishing methods such as barfishing, back trolling, lure casting and bait fishing.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: hue-nut on August 10, 2009, 05:37:18 PM
Rodney do you know if this means that there will be a leader restriction in place?
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Eagleye on August 10, 2009, 06:29:47 PM
I sure hope DFO implements a leader length restriction or is clear as to what methods are acceptable, otherwise it will just create contention between anglers and between us and FN as well.  Ultimately it will probably lead to the river being shut down for sporties if they are not clear as to how one should be fishing.  Unless of course they are just paying lip service to Mr Crey's request.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: chris gadsden on August 10, 2009, 07:18:02 PM
Rodney do you know if this means that there will be a leader restriction in place?
I am sure they will be asking all rec anglers to fish selectively as they did a couple of years back, meaning no BB. If there is lack of compliance, well you know the answer.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: hue-nut on August 10, 2009, 11:04:05 PM
I am sure they will be asking all rec anglers to fish selectively as they did a couple of years back, meaning no BB. If there is lack of compliance, well you know the answer.

so if the river closes BB is to blame? sounds like the BB'rs are about to get framed :o Chris, just curious but a few years back did they just ask people to kindly comply or did they actually regulate it (issue tickets for BB)?
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 10, 2009, 11:06:27 PM
so if the river closes BB is to blame? sounds like the BB'rs are about to get framed :o

No, if catch and release of sockeye salmon by any method becomes more frequent than DFO would like to see, then more management measures would be implemented.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: alwaysfishn on August 11, 2009, 06:39:25 AM
I think we can live without sockeye as we did before they were opened in the 1990's.

Certainly we can live without them. However as long as they are being caught and sold illegally by some of the FN groups it makes no sense (economical or logically) to prevent sports fishermen from catching and keeping sockeye.

Unlike Chris's promises on bb'ing, I promise to keep bringing up this issue.......   ;D
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Easywater on August 11, 2009, 02:32:58 PM
I did a comparison for the Blinkhorn test fishery for Sockeye for years 2006, 2008 & 2009.

DATE   LOCATION   SOCKEYE      DATE   LOCATION   SOCKEYE      DATE   LOCATION   SOCKEYE
                              
Aug 02 2009   Fine Beach   170      Aug 02 2006   Blinkhorn   38      Aug 02 2008   Robson Bight   1
Aug 02 2009   Glory Hole   60      Aug 02 2006   Robson Bight   455      Aug 02 2008   Glory Hole   11
Aug 02 2009   Izumi Rock   1      Aug 02 2006   Glory Hole   135      Aug 02 2008   Cracroft Point   0
Aug 02 2009   Green Shack   450      Aug 02 2006   Sophia/Splash Island   7      Aug 02 2008   Izumi Rock   54
Aug 02 2009   Blinkhorn   320      Aug 02 2006   Izumi Rock   35      Aug 02 2008   Hot Spot   0
Aug 03 2009   Blinkhorn   61      Aug 02 2006   Hillier Point   56      Aug 02 2008   Gravel Beach   4
Aug 03 2009   Robson Bight   54      Aug 05 2006   Hot Spot   485      Aug 03 2008   Robson Bight   20
Aug 03 2009   Glory Hole   52      Aug 05 2006   Glory Hole   380      Aug 03 2008   Glory Hole   9
Aug 03 2009   Izumi Rock   36      Aug 05 2006   Robson Bight   200      Aug 03 2008   Gravel Beach   12
Aug 03 2009   Hot Spot   93      Aug 05 2006   Izumi Rock   36      Aug 03 2008   Izumi Rock   31
Aug 03 2009   Green Shack   50      Aug 05 2006   Cracroft Point   0      Aug 03 2008   Green Shack   46
Aug 04 2009   Fine Beach   194      Aug 05 2006   Blinkhorn   1,030      Aug 03 2008   Blinkhorn   89
Aug 04 2009   Robson Bight   35      Aug 06 2006   Glory Hole   500      Aug 04 2008   Glory Hole   99
Aug 04 2009   Sophia/Splash Island   0      Aug 06 2006   Robson Bight   1,030      Aug 04 2008   Robson Bight   81
Aug 04 2009   Glory Hole   50      Aug 06 2006   Neekis Bay   475      Aug 04 2008   Fine Beach   17
Aug 04 2009   Izumi Rock   106      Aug 06 2006   Sophia/Splash Island   0      Aug 04 2008   Izumi Rock   16
Aug 04 2009   Green Shack   45      Aug 06 2006   Izumi Rock   230      Aug 04 2008   Hot Spot   18
Aug 09 2009   Robson Bight   84      Aug 06 2006   Blinkhorn   215      Aug 04 2008   Blinkhorn   41
Aug 09 2009   Glory Hole   170      Aug 07 2006   Glory Hole   210      Aug 05 2008   Robson Bight   5
Aug 09 2009   Gravel Beach   260      Aug 07 2006   Neekis Bay   420      Aug 05 2008   Glory Hole   65
Aug 09 2009   Sophia/Splash Island   0      Aug 07 2006   Robson Bight   2,330      Aug 05 2008   Izumi Rock   35
Aug 09 2009   Izumi Rock   453      Aug 07 2006   Izumi Rock   300      Aug 05 2008   Hot Spot   36
Aug 09 2009   Blinkhorn   128      Aug 07 2006   Green Shack   0      Aug 05 2008   Cracroft Point   0
Aug 10 2009   Fine Beach   38      Aug 07 2006   Gravel Beach   190      Aug 05 2008   Green Shack   72
Aug 10 2009   Robson Bight   86      Aug 08 2006   Fine Beach   1,700      Aug 10 2008   Blinkhorn   5
Aug 10 2009   Glory Hole   730      Aug 08 2006   Glory Hole   2      Aug 10 2008   Hot Spot   10
Aug 10 2009   Sophia/Splash Island   2      Aug 08 2006   Izumi Rock   610      Aug 10 2008   Robson Bight   49
Aug 10 2009   Hot Spot   146      Aug 08 2006   Gravel Beach   240      Aug 10 2008   Glory Hole   13
Aug 10 2009   Green Shack   62      Aug 08 2006   Sophia/Splash Island   41      Aug 10 2008   Gravel Beach   2
Aug 11 2009   Robson Bight   123      Aug 08 2006   Blinkhorn   640      Aug 10 2008   Green Shack   50
Aug 11 2009   Glory Hole   189      Aug 11 2006   Blinkhorn   1,350      Aug 11 2008   Neekis Bay   10
Aug 11 2009   Izumi Rock   235      Aug 11 2006   Robson Bight   970      Aug 11 2008   Robson Bight   0
Aug 11 2009   Hot Spot   129      Aug 11 2006   Hot Spot   6,000      Aug 11 2008   Glory Hole   5
Aug 11 2009   Green Shack   25      Aug 11 2006   Sophia/Splash Island   1      Aug 11 2008   Izumi Rock   20
            Aug 11 2006   Izumi Rock   143      Aug 11 2008   Green Shack   50
            Aug 11 2006   Green Shack   29      Aug 11 2008   Blinkhorn   13

      4637            20483            989

Didn't think it would format properly but look at the totals at the bottom:

2009 - 4637
2006 - 20483 (the last big year)
2008 - 989    (5 day opening last year)

While the numbers aren't great compared to 2006, they are well up from last year and there was an opening last year.

Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 11, 2009, 03:44:08 PM
Tuesday, August 11, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Tuesday, August 11 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye and pink salmon runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.

Test fishing catches of sockeye continued to track far below expectations over the last several days. At the meeting today, the run size estimate for Early Summer-run sockeye of 150,000 fish was increased to 175,000 fish, with 50% migration timing through Area 20 of July 30, which is four days later than expected. There is still uncertainty in assessments of Summerrun sockeye abundance; however at the meeting today, the Panel adopted a run size estimate of 600,000 Summer-run sockeye, which is far below their 90% probability level forecast of 2,858,000 fish. The estimated 50% migration timing of Summer-run sockeye through Area 20 is August 4, which is one day earlier than expected. The Panel also adopted a run size estimate of 125,000 Harrison Late-run sockeye at the meeting today, which is nearly double their 50% probability level forecast of 69,000 fish. It is too early to provide an update on the run size of non-Harrison Late-run sockeye, however, the proportion of Weaver Creek sockeye in DNA samples has been increasing over the past few days.

Test fishing catches of pink salmon through the marine approach routes have been at modest levels over the past several days. An assessment on the run size of Fraser River pink salmon should be available within approximately two weeks. Migration conditions for sockeye entering the Fraser River have improved over the past week. On August 10 the Fraser River water temperature at Qualark Creek was 18.8 0C, which is 1.1 0C higher than average for this date. Water temperatures in this range may stress migrating sockeye and slow their upstream migration.

Due to the low abundance of Fraser sockeye thus far this season, there have been no directed commercial fisheries for Fraser River sockeye. All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on August 14, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Geff_t on August 11, 2009, 04:09:17 PM
Any word yet Rodney on that other notice regarding no fishing for sockeye.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: chris gadsden on August 11, 2009, 04:20:00 PM
Any word yet Rodney on that other notice regarding no fishing for sockeye.
I was told it is coming out tomorrow.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 11, 2009, 04:30:08 PM
http://www-ops2.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/xnet/content/fns/index.cfm?pg=view_notice&lang=en&DOC_ID=119214&ID=recreational
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: EZ_Rolling on August 11, 2009, 05:04:15 PM
Awesome so if the bouncers don't stop we could loose fishing for pinks this year .


insert roll sarcastic eyes here  ::)
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: mattyo on August 11, 2009, 05:30:10 PM
Its about time they did this!!!!! I'm gonna print off copies of this and pass them out on the bars.
 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: scute on August 11, 2009, 06:38:29 PM
so I supose first nations will have to bar fish for their salmon   ;)do not agree with further restriction when had a friend sturgeon fishing sat.intimidated and threatened off fraser by drift netting first nations boats. >:(nets good;B.b. evil ???
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Morty on August 11, 2009, 07:27:14 PM
I did a comparison for the Blinkhorn test fishery for Sockeye for years 2006, 2008 & 2009.


Wasn't 2005 the brood year for the presently returning Sockeye?
If so, their timing was quite fifferent that '06 or '08
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Davis on August 11, 2009, 07:45:31 PM
Because fisheries incompetance in estimating Run size,they are now saying please don't BB,give me a break,does one actually think people are going to listen to a bunch of nitwits,unless they officially close the flow to BB,people will continue to BB!
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: typhoon on August 11, 2009, 08:44:03 PM
I'm impressed. Previously they only mentioned "selective techniques". This is the first time I've seen BB mentioned in an official DFO release.
Maybe we're on the way to getting a true leader length restriction.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: yoda on August 11, 2009, 11:00:06 PM
what's next summerslayer, bar fishermen with 20ft leaders? :(
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: typhoon on August 12, 2009, 07:41:36 AM

People will continue to bottom bounce, change the weight and its not possable then.
So you're saying that fishing with spoons, jigs, fly fishing or any method other than bar fishing is unacceptable?
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: firstlight on August 12, 2009, 08:08:32 AM
Is good to see them actually mention the different methods in there notice.
Now were getting somewhere. ;D
Title: new update
Post by: yakideath12 on August 12, 2009, 10:29:03 AM
updated
http://www-ops2.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/xnet/content/fns/index.cfm?pg=view_notice&lang=en&DOC_ID=119214&ID=recreational
Title: Re: new update
Post by: Keener on August 12, 2009, 10:33:47 AM
If sockeye encounters are not reduced to ensure the adequate passage of
sockeye, then further actions such as spot closures or a "no fishing for
salmon" restriction may be implemented.
Variation Order Number:  2009-312



Wow.
Title: Re: new update
Post by: doja on August 12, 2009, 10:48:44 AM
WOW, dfo will suggest what you should do  ??? , but won't order what you shouldn't do  ::) .

Hmm, compliance this year ::)

Ya, right.

Sounds like they want the river closed and may get there way.

Title: no more bottom bouncing
Post by: ion on August 12, 2009, 11:44:01 AM
can't believe it; some folks have seen it comming with those statistics...
it's dumb;
the gus that anyway don't fish for salmon can be happy, there will be more cans with salmon at superstore;
Title: Re: no more bottom bouncing
Post by: milo on August 12, 2009, 11:54:45 AM
Oh, the horror!
Now some of us will have to actually learn how to fish.

 :P

Title: Re: no more bottom bouncing
Post by: DionJL on August 12, 2009, 11:59:16 AM
when did the semi-colon replace the period?
Title: Re: no more bottom bouncing
Post by: dennisK on August 12, 2009, 11:59:52 AM
Oh, the horror!
Now some of us will have to actually learn how to fish.

 :P



elitist lol
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Davis on August 12, 2009, 06:26:15 PM
I find it hard to believe that they would close the Fraser to salmon fishing,with all the tourism dollars at stake.All they need to do is limit the leader length and it's done,the socks will pass through unmolested.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: ion on August 12, 2009, 07:44:59 PM
my opinion is that catch and release should have a limit; this is the reason bb looks bad;
guys claiming 30-40 fish a day...
the pinks will have to pass a butchery, now that bb is closed;
you should catch your quota (release it if you like) and leave the spot...
in some countries in europe catch and release is banned; you can release your fish but it counts in daily quota

Title: Re: no more bottom bouncing
Post by: ion on August 12, 2009, 08:08:19 PM
Oh, the horror!
Now some of us will have to actually learn how to fish.

 :P


there is a saying about a fox and the sour grapes\
flyfishing can't catch a sockeye, thus catching it there must be something wrong...
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: ion on August 12, 2009, 09:10:19 PM
does dfo web site have a definition for the specified fishing methods?
i wouldn't like to fish in error...

bb was sport, casting a 3 ounces weight was fun; bar fishing is kind of chatting couple of hours with your fishin'buddy
Title: Re: no more bottom bouncing
Post by: milo on August 12, 2009, 09:12:57 PM

flyfishing can't catch a sockeye

Nothing could be farther from the truth, ion.
Flossing with a fast sinking tip is even more effective than bottom bouncing.

Just go to Pegleg north in early September to check it out. ;)

Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Geff_t on August 12, 2009, 09:19:28 PM
Here is an example of fly fishing for sockeye on the fraser river.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gaCdVoOUsK8

  No it is not me.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Trout Slayer on August 12, 2009, 09:23:26 PM
I remember in 2007 catching 50/50 pinks and sockeye on the fly at grassy.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 12, 2009, 09:44:55 PM
When the regulation "no fishing" for a species is implemented, anglers are required to demonstrate that they are not targeting them. If fishery officers observe an angler catching a species that is closed for fishing repeatedly, then the angler maybe warned or fined.

If an angler is barfishing and catching and releasing sockeye salmon repeatedly, then he or she is required to stop and find an alternative method.

If an angler is flyfishing and catching and releasing sockeye salmon repeatedly, then he or she is required to stop and find an alternative method.

If an angler is lure fishing and catching and releasing sockeye salmon repeatedly, then he or she is required to stop and find an alternative method.

If an angler is backtrolling and catching and releasing sockeye salmon repeatedly, then he or she is required to stop and find an alternative method.

If an angler is bait fishing and catching and releasing sockeye salmon repeatedly, then he or she is required to stop and find an alternative method.

If an angler is bottom bouncing and catching and releasing sockeye salmon repeatedly, then he or she is required to stop and find an alternative method.

Similar management measures are found in many other Lower Mainland fisheries. During the Interior coho salmon and steelhead migration period, a bait ban is implemented in the Tidal Fraser River instead of implementing a total salmon fishing closure during a pink salmon year. Bait fishing with roe is recognized as an effective technique for coho salmon in the Tidal Fraser River and mortality rate of bait-caught coho salmon that are released has been studied in the mid 90s. The study determined possible impacts by anglers, so bait ban becomes an option. The pink salmon fishery was once closed for a couple of season during this period, but thanks to the Sportfishing Advisory Committee, a bait ban is used instead so anglers can still allowed to fish for other species of salmon. During the bait ban period, anglers can still enjoy fishing for pink salmon by other methods such as lure fishing and flyfishing without intercepting too many interior coho salmon or steelhead.

This is not an issue of barfishing vs bottom bouncing, as the same participants of both sides continue to believe. It is an issue of minimizing the by-capture of a species that is closed for targeting. The technique bottom bouncing was mentioned in the fishery notice because overtime the frequency of by-catch is the highest when it is used. Instead of having the entire river closed for fishing as First Nation advocates have asked for, Fisheries and Oceans Canada chooses not to be pressured and keep recreational salmon fishery available by a very simple request, acknowledging that there are many other fishing methods that can be enjoyed without intercepting too many sockeye salmon. Consider it a favour and don't bite the hands that feed you.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Steelhead King on August 12, 2009, 11:27:53 PM
Whatever the DFO said is a big pile of crap.  They conducted a study last season reguarding the sockeye motality rate caught by BB method.. the result came to 0.05%. If the report is true, why is BB is harmful??  Based on other studies, bait fishing for salmon had a way higher motality rate..  So it should be ban baitfishing over all not BBouncing.   Back to the First Nation BS..  I don't care what they said, but i personally there witness twice in 2 different time period, some First Nation drift their nets across the bar on the Fraser late at night. And i can clearly hear the fish flopping inside the boat when the net is up in the boat.   As long as those drift net still sweeping the bar late at night, they have no F-ing right to tell me what method i can or cannot use fishing the Fraser. 
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 12, 2009, 11:29:48 PM
Whatever the DFO said is a big pile of crap.  They conducted a study last season reguarding the sockeye motality rate caught by BB method.. the result came to 0.05%. If the report is true, why is BB is harmful??  Based on other studies, bait fishing for salmon had a way higher motality rate..  So it should be ban baitfishing over all not BBouncing.   Back to the First Nation BS..  I don't care what they said, but i personally there witness twice in 2 different time period, some First Nation drift their nets across the bar on the Fraser late at night. And i can clearly hear the fish flopping inside the boat when the net is up in the boat.   As long as those drift net still sweeping the bar late at night, they have no F-ing right to tell me what method i can or cannot use fishing the Fraser. 

Have fun BBing tomorrow. Do it while you can I guess. ;)
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: ion on August 13, 2009, 12:12:51 AM
Now, where is the border between bottom bouncing, flyfishing and by-rules fishing?
Let say i use a 3/4 jig dressed like a Christmas tree, is that bottom bouncing with a fly? Flyfishing with a weight? Pulling a plug?
If i attach a sliding float, is that float fishing?

And if you report something to dfo, let say some guys fishing with nets for sockeye are trying to sell something to you, how can you follow up to see what dfo does in the matter?

Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 13, 2009, 12:31:12 AM
Now, where is the border between bottom bouncing, flyfishing and by-rules fishing?
Let say i use a 3/4 jig dressed like a Christmas tree, is that bottom bouncing with a fly? Flyfishing with a weight? Pulling a plug?
If i attach a sliding float, is that float fishing?

There are no techniques being prohibited in the changes this week. If you wish to bottom bounce during this management measure, then feel free to do so like many will continue to do. The objective is to minimize interception of sockeye salmon. If you feel that your technique is not intercepting any or too many sockeye salmon, then go for it. If you feel that your technique encounters many sockeye salmon but believe that their mortality is low when released, then go for it.

If you're fishing with a 3/4 jig, it's called jig fishing. If you are jigging and encountering too many sockeye salmon, it's probably a good idea to stop and try something else.

If you are flyfishing with a weight, it's called flyfishing. If you are flyfishing and encountering too many sockeye salmon, it's probably a good idea to stop and try something else.

If you are fishing with a sliding float, it's called float fishing. If you are float fishing and encountering too many sockeye salmon, it's probably a good idea to stop and try something else.

Stop fabricating concerns and pretending to be confused by what DFO's definition of bottom bouncing is when one is fully aware of what DFO wants anglers to do. It's childish and embarrasing when anglers choose to be managed when opportunities to work as river stewards are widely available.

As I mentioned in a different thread, there's no point to keep attempting to convince others to stop bottom bouncing. Those who wish to do it after all the information is given, will continue to do it and feel good about it. At the same time, there's no point to keep justifying bottom bouncing if you wish to keep doing it, those who agree with you already do, those who do not agree with you will continue to disagree with you. When recreational salmon fishery closes completely because angling incompliance is so high that it becomes a problem for DFO's C&P, then it does not really matter who agrees with who.

And if you report something to dfo, let say some guys fishing with nets for sockeye are trying to sell something to you, how can you follow up to see what dfo does in the matter?

You request for a file number that you can refer to when calling back later to follow up.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Steelhead King on August 13, 2009, 12:47:40 AM

Stop fabricating concerns and pretending to be confused by what DFO's definition of bottom bouncing is when one is fully aware of what DFO wants anglers to do. It's childish and embarrasing when anglers choose to be managed when opportunities to work as river stewards are widely available.

As I mentioned in a different thread, there's no point to keep attempting to convince others to stop bottom bouncing. Those who wish to do it after all the information is given, will continue to do it and feel good about it. At the same time, there's no point to keep justifying bottom bouncing if you wish to keep doing it, those who agree with you already do, those who do not agree with you will continue to disagree with you. When recreational salmon fishery closes completely because angling incompliance is so high that it becomes a problem for DFO's C&P, then it does not really matter who agrees with who.



IF they want to close it, they will just close it...  Dosen't matter if every single person stop bouncing. They will find some other lame excuse to close the river.   
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 13, 2009, 01:13:18 AM
I guess this is why everyone keeps repeating their opinions in these threads, gets kind of tiring after a couple of times but some seem to have turn it into a hobby. ;)

Again, the concern is not bottom bouncing, but the number of sockeye salmon being caught and released by recreational anglers. If you barfish, lure fish, bait fish, flyfish, bottom bounce and keep catching and releasing sockeye salmon, then you should stop. If you are bottom bouncing and not hooking sockeye, then go for it, nobody is going to stop you, because apparently they will close the river if they want to.

Unfortunately, Steelhead King's opinion and distrust of Fisheries and Oceans Canada is widely shared among majority of the angling community, which is its achilles heel. If only more people would get involved by joining an organization that has a representation at the local sportfishing advisory committee. If only more people would be more proactive on finding out more about what dialogues are involved behind the scene between Fisheries and Oceans Canada and sportfishing representatives before decisions are made. If only more people would be more educated on fishery management and less skeptical on regulations set out to protect their fish. If only more people would appreciate the relative high abundance of fish that BC still has while global fish production is expected to collapse in our lifetime. If only more people would stop worrying about what others are doing and understand a small step would lead to big progress. If only. Oh well, nothing wrong with dreaming. :)
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: emac on August 13, 2009, 01:23:09 AM
Tragedy of the commons - multiple individuals acting independently in their own self-interest can ultimately destroy a shared limited resource even when it is clear that it is not in anyone's long term interest for this to happen.

If this isn't a classic example of "Tragedy of the Commons" I don't know what is.

Since people are still trying to justify fishing methods that the govt is asking us not to use then the govt will and should take further steps to stop it.  It can be done without a complete closure and for everyones sake I hope we don't see a complete closure.

There is a lot of blame being shifted to FN illegal fishing.  If you were to take an Ethics class this is one of the first dilemmas that would be discussed - "Justify your actions by  shifting the blame on someone else".  Yes, illegal FN fishing is definitely part of the problem.  The govt needs to do a better job at enforcement. 

However, putting the blame on them while continuing to selfishly do your part under the pretense of saying something like "fish caught by rec anglers represents a small percentage compared to FN" makes you no better. 1 fish or a 1,000 fish, it all contributes to the same problem. You are both one in the same.

For those that are interested in becoming leaders and taking steps to solve this problem that were facing I recommend reading The Necessary Revolution by Peter Senge.  Forget the sockeye, eventually there will be no salmon fishing if all parties don't get honest with each other and work together.  That's the only way we're going to "right the ship".

Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Steelhawk on August 13, 2009, 02:16:24 AM
I think it is simple math and logics and in the priority of fish stock conservation, you go after those people and those methods which will take 1000 fish. The 1000 fish taken nightly and repeated will soon wipe out the stock, whereas those with one hook and one rod catching a few socx accidentally with in a low mortality rate after c/r  should not be a priority in stock management. What it comes down to is DFO's tendency to shut down the sporties who is the easiest group to be dictated to. No sporties have ever done road blocks or public demonstrations when they were shut down. We don't get any respect by DFO.  :(
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: ion on August 13, 2009, 10:19:47 AM
As I understood from an article we have a disaster in the numbers of sockeye;
They expected an increase but happened otherwise;
Unfortunately looks like bb debates make a good smoke drape of to cover the lack of competence;   
From sportfishing such thing can't happen all of a sudden, things would go from bad to worse on a light  slope;
Probably those fish farms have something to do with it, but looks like nobody monitored them;
With all these new technologies and chemicals, i'm wondering, would be possible to prduce the pheromones that resemble
sockeye's native place or give them the illusion of the native place, and chum them somewhere else?
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: IronNoggin on August 13, 2009, 12:24:02 PM
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-columbia/millions-of-missing-fish-signal-crisis-onthefraserriver/article1249976/

Disastrous situation. Pointing fingers AIN'T gonna bring them back!

IMO, the greed factor has certainly entered the ranks of the recreational sector, and that is exactly what will see the river shut down. Likely much sooner than later methinks.
This continual bickering and blatent ignoring of what is right under these dire circumstances is exactly what The Dino and the FN's can and do count on - we're are ALWAYS good for it and they well know it. Makes me damn near shamed to be labeled as a recreational angler when I'm lumped in with the greedy swine literally lined up at the trough...  :'(

Nog
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: salmonlover on August 13, 2009, 12:40:06 PM
i was watching cbc news today, they said the scientist were expecting a run of 9.5 million sockeyes! I am just wondering how can 9 million fish go missing? hopefully they find a solution and the government of bc gives more funding in perserving all pacific wild salmon.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: A-BOATER on August 13, 2009, 02:34:58 PM
Steelhawk ... You throw strikes...in other words "you hit the nail on the head" ---- GOOD LOGIC ! :) Couldn't agree with ya more. Maybe when there are a total of 1000 fish in the river EVERYBODY will finally be in one accord to do something... Hope it doesn't come to that !!!!
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: tsawytscha on August 13, 2009, 07:32:57 PM
i was watching cbc news today, they said the scientist were expecting a run of 9.5 million sockeyes! I am just wondering how can 9 million fish go missing? hopefully they find a solution and the government of bc gives more funding in perserving all pacific wild salmon.

well, so 9.5 sockeye are missing......you can bet on  that about 100 milion of fry (smolts) died on their "en-route" to the ocean  two years ago (passing about 11 to 15 fish farms per inlet and being infested by sea lice and actually, eaten alive...) and the remaining "missing" sockeye
were simply too sick and weak to survive the attacks of predatros, ocean overfishing and changes in water temperature.  Go to today's The Globe And Mail and read the sockeye article.  Any discussions at "our end", like the fishing method here on the Fraser, to close Fraser to all fishing now,
whether FN are illegaly dirfting...are almost about nothing if the DFO by their mismanagement already allowed such catastrofic destruction of our wild salmon a few years ago and still allowing all this happening. Every country (just look at Norway) had the same problem with open-pen fish farming.
These farms almost destroyed their salmon runs within a few years.  The open-pen fish farm is not allowed anymore in Norway and even after 8 years after closing the open-pen fish farming, the slamon runs here are still recovering and the country still has a major problem to reinstate the wild runs.
Unless the Government starts to properly regulate fish farming (and type of fish farms) here in BC, unles they will put a possession limit for salmon (let's say 5 chinook and 5 sockeye, 10 chum and 10 pinks per year ) during the recovery time  here in the Fraser, within a short period of time, we
will have no salmon in the fraser. Period. I still remeber how shocke I was when the possession limit for wild Coho was 8 (!!!) about 10 -13 years ago (Chilliwack River), peopel were taking garbage bags full of coho...why such limit ?? Why not 2 or 4 ??  Now, we have no wild coho in Chilliwack
I am sick and tired about all this  (and this is what the Government wants..to annoy us so much that we will give up and they can do their own agenda). But I will not give up fighting for our salmon.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: tsawytscha on August 13, 2009, 07:44:54 PM
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-columbia/millions-of-missing-fish-signal-crisis-onthefraserriver/article1249976/

Disastrous situation. Pointing fingers AIN'T gonna bring them back!

IMO, the greed factor has certainly entered the ranks of the recreational sector, and that is exactly what will see the river shut down. Likely much sooner than later methinks.
This continual bickering and blatent ignoring of what is right under these dire circumstances is exactly what The Dino and the FN's can and do count on - we're are ALWAYS good for it and they well know it. Makes me damn near shamed to be labeled as a recreational angler when I'm lumped in with the greedy swine literally lined up at the trough...  :'(

Nog

Yes pointing fingers will definitely not bring them back....however, it is beyond my comprehension how the DFO can just predict a return of 9.5 mil sockeye , waiting for them to simply show up , and do nothing to prevent the disaster,
when they have all scientic and biologic studies in their hands showing a major declining and major problems with returning sockeye over past years.  DFO did nothing except counting fish coming into the Fraser (when 90% already died on their way TO the Ocean and in the Ocean by a disease or overfishing)  and researching mortality based on BB method.  How many will die (slamon and other fish like sturgeon as well) using the  net drifting method ?? But this mortality is still nominal compared to the major source of salmon destruction - fish farms and commercial overfishing, and also the environmenal  conditions (gravel pitts in the Fraser spawnign grounds, pollution, etc).
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: bederko on August 13, 2009, 09:18:58 PM
Makes me damn near shamed to be labeled as a recreational angler when I'm lumped in with the greedy swine literally lined up at the trough...  Cry

Nog,

You rock, thanks for putting into words exactly how some of us feel.  All 3 user groups (Sport, Commercial & FN) have always been greedy, we want to catch fish and more is always better... But it seems like the last 10 years or so of sockeye "harvesting" has raised the recreational sector to new heights of disgusting greediness putting us in the same ranks as some members of the other two groups. ???  For this year, leave the sockeye alone, is it really this much of an addiction??  Do what you can, complaining about others taking more fish doesn't help in the end.   
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: alwaysfishn on August 13, 2009, 09:40:32 PM
Makes me damn near shamed to be labeled as a recreational angler when I'm lumped in with the greedy swine literally lined up at the trough...  Cry

Nog,

You rock, thanks for putting into words exactly how some of us feel.  All 3 user groups (Sport, Commercial & FN) have always been greedy, we want to catch fish and more is always better... But it seems like the last 10 years or so of sockeye "harvesting" has raised the recreational sector to new heights of disgusting greediness putting us in the same ranks as some members of the other two groups. ???  For this year, leave the sockeye alone, is it really this much of an addiction??  Do what you can, complaining about others taking more fish doesn't help in the end.   


Guys, guys turn down the brightness on your halos.....   they are hurting my eyes  ;D ;D

How can you stand to hang around mere mortals like us??  ::)
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: goblin59 on August 13, 2009, 09:48:55 PM
I say leave them alone for a full 4 year cycle..... then see what the numbers look like. Just no fishing them for 1 year won't cut it!
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: buck on August 13, 2009, 11:27:37 PM
IRONNOGGIN

Pretty much sums up my feels . Great post.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Davis on August 14, 2009, 07:49:55 AM
Shut the river down to everyone untill this disaster can be figured out!Do it now before we lose our beloved Salmon runs fo good!
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: tsawytscha on August 14, 2009, 11:42:02 AM
Shut the river down to everyone untill this disaster can be figured out!Do it now before we lose our beloved Salmon runs fo good!

FINALLY, some attention is being paid to our salmon disaster ...we might get a royal iquiry an a DFO audit. :o

http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/52998597.html
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: VAGAbond on August 14, 2009, 12:54:58 PM
Quote of the day:
Quote

"It's going to be devastating to everyone," said Irvin Figg, president of the United Fishermen and Allied Workers Union.
.....
Figg thinks it's possible too many fish spawned in the previous sockeye cycle, resulting in too much competition for scarce food.


Yup I am sure that is the reason.   The solution is clearly more fish farms so the smolts can fatten on the larvae of the sea lice!
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 14, 2009, 01:18:09 PM
Friday, August 14, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, August 14 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye and pink salmon runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.

Test fishing catches of Fraser sockeye have remained far below expectations over the past several days. At the meeting today, the run size estimates of 175,000 Early Summer-run sockeye and 600,000 Summer-run sockeye were unchanged. Recent DNA analyses indicate that the proportion of Late-run sockeye in the marine approach areas is increasing. At the meeting today, the run size estimate of Harrison sockeye was increased from 125,000 fish to 150,000 fish, which is close to their 25% probability level forecast of 160,000 fish. The estimated peak marine timing of Harrison sockeye through Area 20 is August 4, which is one day later than expected. It is too early to provide an assessment on the run size of Birkenhead and non-Harrison Late-run sockeye, however, if they are near their forecast level of abundance, their 50% marine timing through Area 20 would have to be several days later than expected.

Test fishing catches of pink salmon by purse seines in Johnstone Strait have been at moderate levels over the past week. In Juan de Fuca Strait, test fishing catches of pinks have been generally low, although they increased on August 13. Assessments of the abundance of Fraser River pink salmon will be made near their expected peak migration through the marine approach areas, which usually occurs in late August.

Due to the low abundance of Fraser sockeye thus far this season, there have been no directed commercial fisheries for Fraser River sockeye. All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on August 18, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Easywater on August 14, 2009, 02:32:14 PM
There was another announcement by the PSC today - the interesting part is in italics:

The Fraser River Panel met today to receive assessments from the Pacific Salmon Commission
staff on the status of the Fraser River sockeye and pink salmon runs. Test fishing catches of Fraser
sockeye have remained far below expectations over the past several days. The extremely low abundance
of four year-old Early Summer-run and Summer-run Fraser sockeye to-date has prevented the
commencement of commercial fisheries that were scheduled during pre-season planning. The diversion
rate of Fraser River sockeye through Johnstone Strait is currently estimated to be 50%. There has been
steady escapement of Fraser River sockeye past Mission and Hells Gate over the past week although it
has still been well below expectations.

At the Panel meeting on August 11, the run size estimate for Early Summer-run sockeye of
150,000 fish was increased to 175,000 fish, with 50% migration timing through Area 20 of July 30, which
is four days later than expected. At the meeting today this run size estimate was unchanged. The
estimated escapement of Early Summer-run sockeye past Mission through August 13 is approximately
127,000 fish.

At the meeting on August 11, the Panel adopted a run size estimate of 600,000 Summer-run
sockeye; with 50% migration timing through Area 20 of August 4, which is one day earlier than expected.
At the meeting today this run size estimate was unchanged. The estimated escapement of Summer-run
sockeye past Mission through August 13 is approximately 344,000 fish.

The reason(s) for the very low returns of most Fraser sockeye stocks to-date this season are
presently unknown. However, some potential factors can be rejected. First, the spawning escapement in
the parent year (2005) of four year old Fraser sockeye was 3,300,000 fish; more than 1,000,000 fish
greater than the average escapement on this cycle. There has been no commercial harvest of Fraser River
sockeye this year and the total catch (from First Nations food, social and ceremonial fisheries and test
fisheries used to assess the return) to-date is only 47,000 fish. Thus, overfishing and insufficient
escapement can be ruled out as large numbers of sockeye reached their spawning areas in 2005 and only a
small fraction of the total Fraser sockeye run has been harvested in 2009. Second, freshwater survival
(egg-to-fry or smolt stage) was not a contributing factor in either the Chilko or Quesnel sockeye stocks
which were forecast to produce 7,750,000 fish (approximately 75%) of the 10,488,000 total adult Fraser
River sockeye forecast in 2009. Fry abundances measured through acoustic surveys in Quesnel Lake
(52,000,000 fry) were only slightly below average for the cycle (58,000,000 fry) and the smolt
outmigration estimated through an enumeration fence at the outlet of Chilko Lake (77,000,000 smolts)
was nearly double the previous highest outmigration (40,000,000 smolts) in the 50 year time series.
Third, the warmer than average Fraser River water temperatures in 2009 are also not a factor in the low
return of adults in 2009 because the in-season estimates of Fraser sockeye abundance are generated from
a combination of marine-area test fisheries and lower Fraser River hydro-acoustic surveys and both of
these assessment tools have provided consistent data indicating very low Fraser sockeye abundances.
The above factors, coupled with the poor returns across most of the Fraser River sockeye stocks
suggests that some factors in marine areas sometime between the time of ocean entry of the smolts in late
spring and summer of 2007 and the adult return in 2009 as potential causal factors. Although there have
been some preliminary discussions with experts that conduct research on juvenile sockeye in the ocean,
the current fisheries management focus remains on in-season assessments of the remaining migration of
Fraser sockeye salmon (primarily Late-run stocks) and pink salmon which are expected to peak over the
next few weeks. These assessments along with assessments of other salmon returns along the Pacific
coast are needed to help focus future investigations into potential causal factors for the very low Fraser
sockeye returns being observed.


Recent DNA analyses indicate that the proportion of Late-run sockeye in the marine approach
areas is increasing. A run size estimate of 125,000 Harrison Late-run sockeye (nearly double their 50%
probability level forecast of 69,000 fish) was approved at the Panel meeting on August 11, with peak
Area 20 marine timing of August 4, which is one day later than expected. At the meeting today, the run
size estimate of Harrison sockeye was increased to 150,000 fish, which is close to their 25% probability
level forecast of 160,000 fish. The estimated peak marine timing of Harrison sockeye through Area 20 is
August 4, which is one day later than expected. Thus far this season, Harrison sockeye are unique in that
they are the only Fraser sockeye stock that appears to be returning in higher than their forecast level of
abundance, which may be associated with their different life history and marine migratory behavior
relative to other Fraser sockeye stocks. It is too early to provide an assessment on the run size of
Birkenhead and non-Harrison Late-run sockeye, however, if they are near their forecast level of
abundance, their 50% marine timing through Area 20 would have to be several days later than expected.
Recent DNA analyses indicate that True Late-run sockeye are exhibiting little marine-area delay prior to
entering the Fraser River. The estimated escapement of True Late-run sockeye past Mission through
August 13 is approximately 118,000 fish.

Now, lets look at the possible reasons for the low returns.

As DFO says "The above factors, coupled with the poor returns across most of the Fraser River sockeye stocks
suggests that some factors in marine areas sometime between the time of ocean entry of the smolts in late
spring and summer of 2007 and the adult return in 2009 as potential causal factors
."

Ocean conditions - not applicable because Chinook, Coho and other area Sockeye returns are good - they all swim in the same ocean.
Smolt escapement - not applicable because there was a huge number of smolts in the parent year.

That really only leaves the fish farm issue.

I wll be writing letters to my MP (Nina Grewal) in the next few days to outline my thoughts on this.
My MP has the Fraser River in her riding and has already expressed issues with problems on the river.
I will also be sending a letter to the Minister in charge of DFO (Gail Shae).

In the defence of DFO, they really had no chance to get things right because their initial information showed a good return and you can't tell until they actually arrive (or don't arrive). I do blame DFO for letting the BC Provincial govt having free reign with the fish farms - the oceans are a federal jurisdiction.

Go to this website to find out who your MP is: http://webinfo.parl.gc.ca/MembersOfParliament/MainMPsAddressList.aspx?TimePeriod=Current&Language=E


Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: tsawytscha on August 14, 2009, 03:49:08 PM
There was another announcement by the PSC today - the interesting part is in italics:

Now, lets look at the possible reasons for the low returns.

As DFO says "The above factors, coupled with the poor returns across most of the Fraser River sockeye stocks
suggests that some factors in marine areas sometime between the time of ocean entry of the smolts in late
spring and summer of 2007 and the adult return in 2009 as potential causal factors
."

Ocean conditions - not applicable because Chinook, Coho and other area Sockeye returns are good - they all swim in the same ocean.
Smolt escapement - not applicable because there was a huge number of smolts in the parent year.

That really only leaves the fish farm issue.

I wll be writing letters to my MP (Nina Grewal) in the next few days to outline my thoughts on this.
My MP has the Fraser River in her riding and has already expressed issues with problems on the river.
I will also be sending a letter to the Minister in charge of DFO (Gail Shae).

In the defence of DFO, they really had no chance to get things right because their initial information showed a good return and you can't tell until they actually arrive (or don't arrive). I do blame DFO for letting the BC Provincial govt having free reign with the fish farms - the oceans are a federal jurisdiction.

Go to this website to find out who your MP is: http://webinfo.parl.gc.ca/MembersOfParliament/MainMPsAddressList.aspx?TimePeriod=Current&Language=E

I just recently wrote two letters to the Minister Gail Shea  regarding the sockeye (well, salmon)  disaster and uncontrolled fish farming here in BC , asking for an immediate inquiry and audit and also I wrote a letter to the Governor General (Honourable Michaelle Jean) to express my serious concern, as  the Crown should be aware that her servants (DFO ministry and the Government - provincial and federal) are irresponsibly depleting our precious natural resources.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: tsawytscha on August 14, 2009, 03:54:10 PM
I just recently wrote two letters to the Minister Gail Shea  regarding the sockeye (well, salmon)  disaster and uncontrolled fish farming here in BC , asking for an immediate inquiry and audit and also I wrote a letter to the Governor General (Honourable Michaelle Jean) to express my serious concern, as  the Crown should be aware that her servants (DFO ministry and the Government - provincial and federal) are irresponsibly depleting our precious natural resources.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Davis on August 14, 2009, 04:21:21 PM
Whats it going to take before Gordo opens his eyes,extinction of the run?
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 14, 2009, 04:43:24 PM
http://www-ops2.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/xnet/content/fns/index.cfm?pg=view_notice&lang=en&DOC_ID=119313&ID=recreational

Effective one hour after  sunset Sunday  August 16, 2009 until further notice, a no fishing for all Salmon species restriction will be in place from the Aggasiz / Rosedale Bridge upstream to the Highway No. 1 Bridge at Hope, BC.

Current run size estimates of Fraser River sockeye continue to be well below abundances required to provide a total allowable catch.  The Department's priorities are to ensure that there is sufficient sockeye returning to the spawning grounds for conservation purposes.  The Department is continuing to manage fisheries to minimize sockeye impacts and provide priority access to First Nations' fishing for food, social and ceremonial purposes. 

Anglers fishing for chinook salmon in areas that remain open to salmon fishing are required to take every measure possible to ensure that their fishing activities are not impacting sockeye salmon.  The Department is continuing to monitor the Fraser River to ensure compliance.

Recreational fishing opportunities for trout, steelhead and sturgeon and other non-salmon species in this area remain open.  In addition, recreational fishing opportunities on the Fraser River for pink and chum salmon are anticipated.

For the 24 hour recorded opening and closure line, call toll free at (866) 431-FISH.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Steelhawk on August 14, 2009, 06:41:33 PM
I guess  this will mean Peg Leg will be a zoo, even if people have to swim across. They better have the search & rescue team on standby.  ;D

But seriously, if DFO really think bb can threaten the fish stock with the minimum impact (not supported by the study or statistical number), then they should stop all groups from fishing. Have the gut to face up to FN and go after all illegal nets & check out all illegal sales of fish. We are the scape goat of their incompetence, unfortunately.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Geff_t on August 14, 2009, 07:55:06 PM
well I am glad they kept the rest of the river open so that some of us can still fly fish and chuck spoons for those early pinks.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: bigguy on August 14, 2009, 08:27:26 PM
Rod, are they projecting a rec. fishery for pinks and chum in September or later in August?
Title: No fishing for salmon, Aggasiz/Rosedale Bridge to Hwy 1 Bridge in Hope
Post by: troutbreath on August 14, 2009, 09:39:49 PM
If there's an issue about conservation/detrimental affect of sport fishing, shut the whole thing down.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: bbronswyk2000 on August 14, 2009, 10:11:34 PM
Whats it going to take before Gordo opens his eyes,extinction of the run?

Do your research. Its the federal government that has control of our tidal waters where the problems exsist.....
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: tsawytscha on August 15, 2009, 01:14:25 AM
Do your research. Its the federal government that has control of our tidal waters where the problems exsist.....

One would expect that the two Governments (provincial & federal) DO communicate with each other and that the provincial would inform the federals about any problems here... :o
Title: Re: No fishing for salmon, Aggasiz/Rosedale Bridge to Hwy 1 Bridge in Hope
Post by: tsawytscha on August 15, 2009, 01:21:17 AM
If there's an issue about conservation/detrimental affect of sport fishing, shut the whole thing down.

I think that their (DFO) point now is to minimize fishing from the easy accessible bars (from the shore).  These "walk-in" bars are usually packed up by real "bottom bouncers" and "snaggers"  who
are throwing (their method cannot be even named "casting") their  80 lb lines, size 1 hook and 4-5 oz leads directly into the pools under their feet and kill a fish first before "studying"
whether they snagged  a salmon or sturgeon.  But the reality is, that you can get more fish by flyfishing than by bb method.....
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: wacker on August 15, 2009, 11:56:36 AM
Oh no that darn s----ing word sprouted up again...hope nobody is offended.Or are you referring to fish getting "snagged into nets"? ;) ;)
Title: BB is allowed below agassiz bridge?
Post by: glycine on August 15, 2009, 06:03:26 PM
"Recreational fishing opportunities for trout, steelhead and sturgeon and other non-salmon species in this area remain open"
this means BB is allowed below agassiz bridge?
i fished at pegleg for 2weeks,  but i couldnt see any socks caught. which means BB is "not impacting sockeye salmon".
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: glycine on August 15, 2009, 08:05:11 PM
THEY AREN"T THERE YET? in the middle of aug?
i saw only one sock caught at pegleg since 2007.
2006 was different story. the bar was accesible early(probably end of jul). every time i fished there i got my sockeye limit.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: glycine on August 15, 2009, 08:39:28 PM
i found wild sockeye at the superstore in north vancouver today.
they cost about $20 per fish.
for wild cohos $20-30 per fish.
the what i concern is pinks..
they cost $5-8 for two fish pack.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: colin6101 on August 15, 2009, 09:28:19 PM
I saw some people attempting to bottom bounce in the tidal area of the fraser yesterday. I understand why people use the method when the water can't be fished any other way, but watching someone attempt to fish water with very little current running through it in this way was just silly. I was chucking spoons hoping for an early pink or some jack springs, and happened to glance at their tackle box and all they had was bettys, wool and hooks. They would cast out, their weight would sink to the bottom and stay there. Then they would reel it in and repeat. It's sad thats the only way some people know how to fish.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 15, 2009, 09:49:57 PM
I saw some people attempting to bottom bounce in the tidal area of the fraser yesterday. I understand why people use the method when the water can't be fished any other way, but watching someone attempt to fish water with very little current running through it in this way was just silly. I was chucking spoons hoping for an early pink or some jack springs, and happened to glance at their tackle box and all they had was bettys, wool and hooks. They would cast out, their weight would sink to the bottom and stay there. Then they would reel it in and repeat. It's sad thats the only way some people know how to fish.

This is when you go up to them and say... "Hey, have you checked out that website Fishing with Rod? It tells you how to catch salmon on the Tidal Fraser with spoons." ;D

Education (not to be confused with "education" in some of the sockeye threads) can make things better for everyone.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Steelhead King on August 15, 2009, 11:06:04 PM
WHY would you bb when DFO has asked anglers to use methods which DO NOT target sockeye? >:(  It will be thanks to the bb crowd to have the rest of the Fraser closed. Maybe the reason no sockeye were caught at Pegleg is BECAUSE THEY AREN"T THERE YET.

I have fished bars below island 22 the last few weeks.. i can say i hook more springs then sockeye. And i have nothing to hide, i love to Bounce...  You just have to know where to anchor your boat.. you want to fish the "sping"  water not slack water where the sockeye most likely to be resting.  Plus, i have talked to the researcher guy the other day, he told me that they have over 175 fish in the pan last seaseon, all caught by bouncing, hold them for 24hrs and only 2 didn't make it...  which is just little over 1%.  Which it proven that even a snaged sockeye, if release they will make it to spawing ground.   
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: hue-nut on August 15, 2009, 11:32:55 PM
I have fished bars below island 22 the last few weeks.. i can say i hook more springs then sockeye. And i have nothing to hide, i love to Bounce...  You just have to know where to anchor your boat.. you want to fish the "sping"  water not slack water where the sockeye most likely to be resting.  Plus, i have talked to the researcher guy the other day, he told me that they have over 175 fish in the pan last seaseon, all caught by bouncing, hold them for 24hrs and only 2 didn't make it...  which is just little over 1%.  Which it proven that even a snaged sockeye, if release they will make it to spawing ground.   

Don't know one guy fishing the bars that i've been on that is not "bombing it" into the spring water, the further you can cast the more springs you get.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: colin6101 on August 16, 2009, 01:02:37 AM
This is when you go up to them and say... "Hey, have you checked out that website Fishing with Rod? It tells you how to catch salmon on the Tidal Fraser with spoons." ;D

Education (not to be confused with "education" in some of the sockeye threads) can make things better for everyone.
I should have thought of mentioning the site! I did however show them what has worked for me in the past there and inform them that the upper river was closed above Agassiz (they told me they were going to try Scale Bar the next day). Im not morally judging people who bottom bounce, I just thought it was sad that they didn't have a clue how to fish slack water.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: mattyo on August 16, 2009, 04:55:15 PM
Was out this weekend and was pleasantly surprised to see how many people were not bottom bouncing. This newest notice must have made some think twice about snagging their springs :o . I think there were about 4 or 5 bar rigs on grassy ;D
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: jetboatjim on August 16, 2009, 09:09:23 PM
I have fished bars below island 22 the last few weeks.. i can say i hook more springs then sockeye. And i have nothing to hide, i love to Bounce...  You just have to know where to anchor your boat.. you want to fish the "sping"  water not slack water where the sockeye most likely to be resting.  Plus, i have talked to the researcher guy the other day, he told me that they have over 175 fish in the pan last seaseon, all caught by bouncing, hold them for 24hrs and only 2 didn't make it...  which is just little over 1%.  Which it proven that even a snaged sockeye, if release they will make it to spawing ground.   

Did they follow these fish through the canyon?
did they radio tag them?
did they tag and record, and follow up on natal streams?

they wont know if that snagged sockeye made it the 500 km...
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: alwaysfishn on August 16, 2009, 10:27:25 PM
Thanks Jim, too many bb'ers hiding behind " its a legal method to fish "

 ???  ??? 

It is a legal method  ;D 

And I don't think that the bb'ers were hiding.....   That's why they were banned from the upper fraser along with all other salmon fishermen...  ;)
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Reel Lucky on August 17, 2009, 10:21:40 AM
There seems to be a lot of complaining and blaming, but you guys should feel fortunate that your fisheries actually takes some action.  It may not always be the most accurate action but they aren't going to make everyone happy.  If they don't do something soon the fisheries is going to end up like us here in the states, underfunded and non regulated.  I agree with both sides of the arguement whether to bottom bounce or not.  I agree that it isn't the most talented fishing and it may target some sockeye, but it also targets other fish species.  It is practically the only method because the river is so dirty.  Fisherman need to learn to cast out there where the springs are sitting.  I have seen time after time the people that short cast right over me either hook a sock or get tangled up.  Where as the guys in my boat are bombing it out there and only hooking springs.  If they are worried about the catch and release of the socks then make i t manditory that there is no handle of the fish and use a release hook.  It is unfortunate that many people bought there licenses looking forward to the awesome year and are again let down.  Next time predict low and suprise us instead of devistating us.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Easywater on August 17, 2009, 10:54:40 AM
Massive catch of Sockeye yesterday in Area 13 (Johnstone Strait): 2465 when they have been catching between 100 and 300 per day.

Also reports of large numbers of Sockeye off Ucluelet.

15,800 Pinks caught in Area 13 as well.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: tsawytscha on August 17, 2009, 12:00:05 PM
Massive catch of Sockeye yesterday in Area 13 (Johnstone Strait): 2465 when they have been catching between 100 and 300 per day.

Also reports of large numbers of Sockeye off Ucluelet.

15,800 Pinks caught in Area 13 as well.


Are they (sockeye ) Fraser-bound run(s) ???

Here is the letter to the Minister:

------ Forwarded Message
From: Alexandra Morton <wildorca@island.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Aug 2009 23:36:00 -0700
To: "Min@dfo-mpo.gc.ca" <Min@dfo-mpo.gc.ca>, "sproutpa@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca" <sproutpa@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca>, <Rosenburger@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca>
Cc: "fishfarmrev@lists.onenw.org" <fishfarmrev@lists.onenw.org>, Ernie Crey <sqemel@shaw.ca>, Bob Chamberlin <mooguy@shaw.ca>
Conversation: DFO how do you know?
Subject: DFO how do you know?

Dear Fisheries Minster Shea:

I am following the news that DFO is reporting 11 million sockeye salmon have vanished.  The magnitude, social impact and trajectory of this fishery failure is on a par with the collapse of Canada’s  Atlantic cod.  Scientists have published on what went wrong within DFO to allow the cod, one of earth’s most abundant food resources to collapse.  They identified political distortion of the science as a critical factor. They argue the public was not accurately informed as the collapse was underway.

(Hutchings, J.A., Walters, C., and Haedrich, R.L. 1997. Is scientific inquiry incompatible with government information control? Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 54: 1198–1210. )

This brings me to several recent comments in the media attributed to high-ranking DFO employees.  Bary Rosenburger, DFO area director for the Fraser,  describes the Fraser sockeye collapse as unexpected and that DFO doesn’t know what happened  (Globe and Mail, Aug 13, 2009). But the next day he goes on to say it does not look like fish farms are responsible (BCLocalNews.com). 

On August 15, Paul Sprout, Pacific Region Director for DFO published a letter in the Globe and Mail “Sea lice from fish farms are not the explanation of this year’s extremely poor marine survival of Fraser River sockeye...”

Given both the importance of the Fraser sockeye to the BC economy, ecology and First Nations; and the analysis that DFO political interference with science may have allowed the east coast cod to collapse, it is reasonable to ask what science did Sprout and Rosenburger use to inform the public that fish farms are not responsible for this sockeye collapse?

Two of your highest ranking employees involved with this fishery have publicly exonerated the fish farmers, an industry  associated with catastrophic salmon collapse worldwide (Ford and Myers 2008) and here in BC (Krkosek et al 2007).

The most recent past catastrophic BC wild salmon collapse was in 2002 when 99% of the Broughton pink salmon failed to return. The Pink Salmon Action Plan (http://www.fish.bc.ca/node/135) temporarily removed farm salmon from the Broughton pink salmon migration route and the next generation of pink salmon returned at the highest survivorship ever recorded for the species (Beamish et al 2006). That management decision was reversed and the stock collapsed again.

Dr. Brian Riddell of the Pacific Salmon Foundation suggests that answers to the fate of these sockeye may lie in what happened to them right after they left the Fraser River, before they reached the open ocean.  I and others did examine this run of sockeye shortly after they left the Fraser River. We were the last scientists to see these fish before they disappeared, and they had up to 28 sea lice on them as they passed the salmon farms off Campbell River.

Before you reply that DFO’s Dr. Simon Jones says young salmon are highly resistant to lice, please review his publications.  I do not find the data in his studies to support this claim once the lice are attached to the fish. Many international scientific papers  run contrary to Dr. Jones’ assertions.

I cannot tell you that fish farms definitely killed all 11 million missing Fraser sockeye, but fish farms most certainly are involved because DFO and the Province of BC sited them on the Fraser River migration route. The missing sockeye did swim through fish farm effluent. Rather than exempting fish farms from your investigation you must order complete disclosure of the health and number of farm salmon on the missing Fraser sockeye migration route in 2006-present. And we, the people of Canada and beyond, need to know why DFO is exonerating fish farms in the first few days of the investigation on what happened to one of earth’s most generous human food supplies?

Alexandra Morton
www.adopt-a-fry.org

Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: JustinG on August 17, 2009, 01:13:37 PM
From my understanding, Alexandra Morton is not a marine biologist nor is she even a scientist on any accredited level. I have heard her debate her side with actual marine biologists and her arguments fail and when they do she switches to fear mongering.

I would ask why is the Harrison run producing such high returns while every run up river is collapsing? Why is it that as our population increases we do not demand that our tax dollars go towards better infrastructure to deal with OUR waste? Fish farms do create an environment where sea lice can thrive but OUR pollution is the most SIGNIFICANT variable... very few consider what they flush down the toilet, pour down their drain and wash down our storm drains. Personally, that is what I focus on, not the red herring I believe we are being led with.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: dereke on August 17, 2009, 02:09:28 PM
Are they (sockeye ) Fraser-bound run(s) ???


 I believe they are yes. The test set website show what directed stock the particular set is for i.e. Barkley or Fraser fish. I still think all this doom and gloom may be a little premature. Here's to hoping this will be the beginning of it.........
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Steelhawk on August 17, 2009, 05:44:39 PM
If this report is true, it makes shutting down bb sporties a joke. We don't ever come close to killing that many c/r sockeyes in a season. Above Rosedales, there are only 4 popular bb bars - Seabird, Laidlaw, Pipeline, & Scale. The # of fishermen and incidental sockeye catch on week days are small. The # of sockeyes caught accidentally during a full day fishing hardly topped 20 fish per bar. With the low mortality rate, to say that these folks are threatening sockeye stocks are a joke. The only achievement by DFO is to further cutting back license-buying fishermen's right to fish in a legal method.

Now the FN nets and test fishery are killing much much much more fish. So, why stop people exercersing their rights to enjoy their preferred way to fish if their action is so insignificant to the fish stock? Where is human rights in this country? Where is the science to back up DFO's actions. The only thing I see is autocratic approach when dealing with the group with the most tax payers, and most hard-working fishermen who don't wish to take a fish by a massive net (talking about fairness to the fish), and by dozing off (talking about deserving your catch).

BBers don't have to hide anything. They don't live or struggle in a mental prison about whether a fish deserves to be your dinner when it just wants to have its own dinner. As long as DFO allows fish taken this way, it is game to us. We are at peace with our fishing method for the dirty Fraser with the limited resources (without a boat & a truck) and time (most are not retirees), as much as  we are at peace with using traps to catch crabs/shrimps, a net to catch smelts or to spear fish when visiting & diving among tropical reefs. There are so many different methods out there for a fish to be caught in the world in the most effective way the respective environment allows. BB is just the most effective legal method to catch fish on the dirty Fraser during these fish's peak run time.

I am proud to explore the skills needed to line a spring and to avoid a sockeye. It takes great analytical skill to use your betty to map out the river bottom of the river bars in front of you, as if you are down there yourself to see where a spring will like to hide. |By casting out progressively further at distance of 30ft, 40, 50, 60 etc., and count how many seconds before the betty hits bottom, you can form the vision where the drop offs are, where the deep trenches are. Springs hide in these places whereas sockeyes are just close to shore in slacker water. If you think bb is purely random and chaotic, and that any one can succeed by just blindly cast out your betty, you are missing the fun.

BB is not recommended on the Vedder of smaller systems with clear water. In slack water of the smaller systems, you will lose tons of lead by bb. BBers should switch to other methods for better result and less than to foul hook a fish. The bb brothers I know also enjoy their steelhead/coho hunts with spoons, spinners, jigs, float with roe, shrimp etc. Now nothing beats chucking out a pink spoon to the schools of pinks during rising tides. There is a time and a season for every fishing endeavour.

Tight line.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Easywater on August 17, 2009, 06:47:41 PM
If this report is true...

Here's the link: http://www.psc.org/TestFish/Area13PSsummary.PDF

The numbers for the last few weeks are better than I thought.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: dereke on August 17, 2009, 06:48:59 PM
  Steelhawk while I do feel some of your pain for sure with the mess on the Fraser I'm pretty sure those test sets are not gillnets but seines and they do not kill them. Cottonwood, Whonnock, Albion, and San Juan are the only gillnet test sets and they recieve pretty light catches from what I have seen. Otherwise there would be almost 60,000 dead pinks already in the blinkhorn test sets already :o :o :o.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: alwaysfishn on August 17, 2009, 08:53:03 PM
From my understanding, Alexandra Morton is not a marine biologist nor is she even a scientist on any accredited level. I have heard her debate her side with actual marine biologists and her arguments fail and when they do she switches to fear mongering.

I would ask why is the Harrison run producing such high returns while every run up river is collapsing? Why is it that as our population increases we do not demand that our tax dollars go towards better infrastructure to deal with OUR waste? Fish farms do create an environment where sea lice can thrive but OUR pollution is the most SIGNIFICANT variable... very few consider what they flush down the toilet, pour down their drain and wash down our storm drains. Personally, that is what I focus on, not the red herring I believe we are being led with.


I don't think it's necessary to discredit someone when you disagree with them. Just because someone hasn't taken the university training does not mean they don't know what they are talking about. She has nothing to gain from her campaign. The government is against her, the fish farms are against her yet she puts up with the attacks because she is passionate about wild salmon. She is not against fish farms, she is against putting them where they can damage the wild salmon. In my books she's a BC hero!

It is a fact that 2-3 years ago DFO counted nearly 100,000,000 sockeye smolts ready to enter the fraser and then the ocean. The problem is that rather than the typical 10% returning after 2 years, less than 1% appears to be returning. I agree that our pollution is part of the problem, however the only contact the sockeye would have had with concentrated pollution would be sewage discharge in the lower fraser.  I think if that pollution was killing them you would have seen some of the 100 million smolts either floating in Johnstone Strait or floating up on some of Vancouver's beaches. On the other hand sea lice would likely cause the smolts to die a slow death and they would be picked off by by predators leaving no evidence of their demise. Highly unlikely that you would see any dead smolts floating around.

Unfortunately like they did on the east coast with the cod, the DFO is directed by the government and as a result their scientists are probably being directed by the political agenda first and instructed to come up with science that supports that agenda.

Of course I'm not a scientist, but like Alexandra Morton, I'm just applying simple logic to it.  ;)

Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: JustinG on August 18, 2009, 10:54:21 AM
I am not a scientist either but someone close to me is and he knows Alexandra from his time at DFO. I take exception when someone says the DFO scientists are directed by "the political agenda". It is simply not true. How their findings are reported and used for policy, that is another issue.

I have been diving commercially and through sport for over 20 years from Northern Washington to the Alaskan border. The deterioration near major centres that I have witnessed over that time is incredible. Where once there were green underwater forests are covered with a dead greyish silt. The toxins in the water may not kill the smolts but weaken them enough where they are easy prey to disease, parasites and predators. Again, I am not a scientist and my observations are completely anecdotal.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: alwaysfishn on August 18, 2009, 11:10:59 AM
I take exception when someone says the DFO scientists are directed by "the political agenda". It is simply not true. How their findings are reported and used for policy, that is another issue.


And the difference is.......?? ???
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 18, 2009, 11:18:52 AM
And the difference is.......?? ???

Are you serious? The difference is that contracted scientists follow scientific methodology to obtain their results. How the upper level wishes to take action based on those results is beyond their control.

Just apply logic to it... I didn't realize a B Sc., M Sc. and Ph D are that useless. If only Fisheries and Oceans Canada could get rid of all the qualified individuals and hire those who could apply logic. Logic is definitely not subjective at all...

The problem with a discussion forum such as this is that anyone can participate and majority of the participants do not have a scientific background. When one presents some information with no scientific basis, another takes it as a fact. Plenty of information presented so far is either misinformation that has been taken as fact or theories derived from that information that has been taken as logic. This is not to suggest those who do not have a scientific background lack the interlligence to participate, but simply are not qualified to do so. Same as that I wouldn't dare to make suggestions to a home builder, plumber or electrician on how they should do their job, because I have absolutely no training in these fields.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: jon5hill on August 18, 2009, 11:19:35 AM
From my understanding, Alexandra Morton is not a marine biologist nor is she even a scientist on any accredited level. I have heard her debate her side with actual marine biologists and her arguments fail and when they do she switches to fear mongering.

Alexandra Morton graduated from the American University in Washington D.C. with Bachelor of Science

If you have actually read the journals, published in the most widely read and highly regarded scientific literature that clearly and very elegantly demonstrates that sea louse are responsible for the death of thousands of juvenile pink salmon in the Broughton Archipelago, then you might have a different perspective.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 18, 2009, 01:49:38 PM
Tuesday, August 18, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Tuesday, August 18 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye and pink salmon runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed. Test fishing catches of Fraser sockeye have continued to be generally been low over the past several days. However, the marine migration of some Fraser sockeye stocks is more protracted than was expected, which has caused some run size assessments to increase slightly. At the meeting today, the run size estimate of 175,000 Early Summer-run sockeye was unchanged, while the estimate of 600,000 Summer-run sockeye was increased to 700,000 fish with 50% marine timing through Area 20 of August 6. The Panel adopted a run size estimate of 100,000 fish for the Birkenhead stock-group, which is below their 90% probability level forecast of 132,000 fish. Their estimated 50% marine timing through Area 20 is August 18, which is seven days later than expected. At the meeting today, the run size estimate of Harrison sockeye was increased from 150,000 fish to 200,000 fish, which exceeds their 25% probability level forecast of 160,000 fish. The estimated peak marine timing of Harrison sockeye through Area 20 is August 8, which is five days later than expected. The Panel also approved a run size estimate for Weaver/Shuswap sockeye of 250,000 fish, which is slightly below their 75% probability level forecast of 277,000 fish. Their estimated 50% marine timing through Area 20 is August 19, which is seven days later than expected. The estimate of total True Late-run sockeye abundance is 450,000 fish, which is the sum of the estimates of Harrison and Weaver/Shuswap sockeye abundances. The estimated total Fraser sockeye return this season is currently 1,510,000 fish, which is less than half of their 90% probability level forecast of 3,556,000 fish.

Test fishing catches of pink salmon in marine areas have generally been increasing over the past week. Assessments of the abundance of Fraser River pink salmon will be made near their expected peak migration through the marine approach areas, which usually occurs in late August. On August 17 the Fraser River discharge at Hope was approximately 2,800 cms, which is 20% lower than average for this date, while the water temperature at Qualark Creek was 18.1 0C, which is 0.6 0C higher than average for this date. Fraser River water temperatures are forecast to increase to almost 20 0C by August 26. Water temperatures exceeding 19 0C may cause stress to sockeye and slow their upstream migration.

Due to the low abundance of Fraser sockeye thus far this season, there have been no directed commercial fisheries for Fraser River sockeye. All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on August 21, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Frankey on August 18, 2009, 05:22:53 PM
Thanks for the updated info Rodney!
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: GoldHammeredCroc on August 18, 2009, 10:25:46 PM
Yes, thanks again Rodney.  Nice to see some success stories on the horizon and should make for a busier fall season.

Slightly off topic but follows a couple of other posts here, while there have been many reports and publications from concerned parties about how sea lice impact migrating juvenile salmonids, where are the reports from the industry actually proving that they don't?  I wouldn't mind seeing some additional work from third party researchers (with relevant training of course in natural salmonid migration + knowledge of a working fish farm), but who have no allegiance to any sector of the industry to produce unbiased reports. 

Wouldn't it be a relief to find out that there is no impact on their migration from the fish farms?  Next step would be to find out what is the root of the problem - sewage outfalls, low oxygenated water in the strait, massive predation from hake, huge shoals of mackerel lurking off our coast?  If it does have a massive impact, then steps need to be addressed, because stocks won't last too long with that immediate impact on their way out plus all of BC's resident's demand (Sporties, FN, and commerical) on their return.  Throw in high temperatures in the Fraser as well as spawning tributary streams, decreasing snow pack levels, loss of spawning habitat....

The list goes on.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: alwaysfishn on August 18, 2009, 10:36:45 PM
Are you serious? The difference is that contracted scientists follow scientific methodology to obtain their results. How the upper level wishes to take action based on those results is beyond their control.


When I think of DFO I think of them as one department. As a department I believe they are politically not scientifically directed. Which begs the question, why would a scientist with any sort of personal integrity continue to work for someone who twists or misstates their science in order to further a political agenda?
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 18, 2009, 10:47:12 PM
When I think of DFO I think of them as one department. As a department I believe they are politically not scientifically directed.

And that is the problem which I have pointed out again and again. Perhaps getting to know some of the staff and how things are done is a better approach before start criticizing on items that you are not familiar with.

Believing, assuming, generalizing are not to be confused with knowing, which many are doing in these threads, on all sides of the issue.

why would a scientist with any sort of personal integrity continue to work for someone who twists or misstates their science in order to further a political agenda?

Because individuals in the field that they are trained in prefer to work in a governing body where changes can take place, even if the chance is slim. The alternative (lack of job security, working individually to hopefully achieve the same result) is not that appealing.

Some do end up leaving after having had enough.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: alwaysfishn on August 19, 2009, 05:59:44 AM
And that is the problem which I have pointed out again and again. Perhaps getting to know some of the staff and how things are done is a better approach before start criticizing on items that you are not familiar with.

Believing, assuming, generalizing are not to be confused with knowing, which many are doing in these threads, on all sides of the issue.

Because individuals in the field that they are trained in prefer to work in a governing body where changes can take place, even if the chance is slim. The alternative (lack of job security, working individually to hopefully achieve the same result) is not that appealing.

Some do end up leaving after having had enough.

I can see that you know some individuals that are in that situation and it is obvious I do not. I can to some extent appreciate the circumstances that they work in and my criticism is in no way pointed at any individual.

I believe that this type of forum provides one of the few opportunities for a lot of people to discuss/criticize/complement, individuals/issues/organizations. In the process everyone learns. Just because someone is unfamiliar or misinformed with an issue it shouldn't eliminate them from the discussion. In the end I believe people form opinions through the discussion, whether the opinions are the truth probably depends on who you ask.  :-\
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Frankey on August 19, 2009, 02:33:33 PM
I would think Alexandra Morton is a hero! Her knowledge and scientific studies of the affect of sea lice on junevile salmon makes her more then qualified to be the spokesperson on this issue.I would say shes an expert on the topic and I for one applaud her efforts and actions.Thank you Alex
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 21, 2009, 02:03:36 PM
Friday, August 21, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, August 21 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye and pink salmon runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed. The migration of Fraser sockeye through the marine approach routes has continued at low abundance levels over the past week. At the meeting today Fraser sockeye run size estimates were unchanged: 175,000 Early Summer-run; 700,000 Summer-run; 100,000 Birkenhead; 200,000 Harrison; and 250,000 Weaver/Shuswap sockeye. The marine migration of Fraser River pink salmon through the assessment areas has been increasing over the past week. It is too early to provide a run size estimate for Fraser River pink salmon since their forecast peak migration period through the marine assessment areas has not yet occurred. However, present assessments indicate that Fraser pinks are tracking abundance levels near or exceeding their 75% probability level forecast of 12,490,000 fish, depending on assumptions about their marine migration timing.

On August 20 the Fraser River discharge at Hope was approximately 2,500 cms, which is about 25% lower than normal, while the water temperature at Qualark Creek was 18.9 0C, which is 1.4 0C higher than average for this date. Water temperatures are forecast to increase to 19.4 0C by August 26 and then decline. Water temperatures exceeding 19 0C may cause stress to sockeye and slow their upstream migration.

All commercial fisheries in Panel Area waters remain closed to fishing at the present time.

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on August 25, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Easywater on August 24, 2009, 04:41:30 PM
"The estimated total non-commercial catch of Fraser sockeye this season is 61,000 fish; harvested in test fisheries and First Nations FSC fisheries."

The total estimated FN catch so far is 15,923 Sockeye (http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fraserriver/firstnations/HTMLs/SockeyeKeptCatch.html)

Add a zero to that and you are getting close.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 25, 2009, 02:47:52 PM
Tuesday, August 25, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Tuesday, August 25 to receive an update on the migration of the Fraser River sockeye and pink salmon runs and review the status of migration conditions in the Fraser River watershed.

The migration of Fraser sockeye through Juan de Fuca Strait has declined considerably in recent days, while in Johnstone Strait there has been low but steady migration. At the meeting today the run size estimates of 175,000 Early Summer-run and 450,000 True Late-run sockeye were unchanged. The run size estimate of 700,000 Summer-run sockeye was decreased to 650,000 fish, with 50% migration timing through Area 20 of August 4. The Panel also reduced the run size estimate for the Birkenhead stock-group from 100,000 fish to 60,000 fish, with 50% migration timing through Area 20 of August 12.

The marine migration of Fraser River pink salmon through the assessment areas has continued to be strong over the past several days. It is too early to provide a run size estimate for Fraser River pink salmon since their forecast peak migration period through the marine assessment areas has not yet occurred. However, present assessments indicate that Fraser pinks are tracking abundance levels exceeding their 75% probability level forecast of 12,490,000 fish. On August 24 the Fraser River discharge at Hope was approximately 2,400 cms, which is about 25% lower than normal, while the water temperature at Qualark Creek was 18.3 0C, which is 1.3 0C higher than average for this date. Water temperatures are forecast to average approximately 18 0C over the next ten days.

The Panel announced the following regulations for Panel Area waters directed at the harvest of pink salmon:

CANADIAN FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Remain closed to fishing.

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

TREATY INDIAN FISHERY:

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: Open to drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Wednesday, August 26, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Saturday, August 29, 2009. All sockeye caught are for ceremonial and subsistence use only.

NON INDIAN FISHERY:

Areas 7 and 7A: Open to reefnets with non-retention of sockeye from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Wednesday, August 26, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Thursday, August 27, 2009; and from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, August 28, 2009.

(Note: U. S. Non-Treaty fishers should check the U.S. hotline and WDFW regulations before fishing as there are additional State of Washington regulations, including time restrictions that may be in effect).

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on August 26, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: mattyo on August 25, 2009, 06:19:33 PM
Lookin good for the pinks ;D. I might actually be able to catch a salmon this season :o
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Steelhawk on August 25, 2009, 11:41:24 PM
If the pinks are running strong, whatever happened to the sockeyes? Don't they share the same migration route? ???
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: FishOn on August 26, 2009, 01:17:23 AM
Not too sure if they share the same migration route, or not, but they certainly don't have the same life cycle. Sockeye are on a 4 year cycle while pinks are on a 2 year cycle. The sockeye that are returning now entered the ocean 2 years sooner than the pinks that are returning now, so you can't really compare the two.

What's more intriguing is why are the Fraser sockeye runs so dismal while other sockeye runs on the Westcoast, Northern BC and Alaska are so strong?
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: dereke on August 26, 2009, 08:05:29 AM
 
If the pinks are running strong, whatever happened to the sockeyes? Don't they share the same migration route? ???
From the test set #'s I have seen it appears that they do. Although the pink numbers are through the roof and sockeye are just kind of steady.......over 150,000 pink have been counted at the blinkhorn area sets and only 20,000 sockeye. If the run size estimates are somewhat the same you would think the number might be close. I guess more sockeye could be running around the outside but the numbers out there show the same pattern in the San juan sets. :'( :'(
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: DragonSpeed on August 26, 2009, 09:00:10 AM
If the pinks are running strong, whatever happened to the sockeyes? Don't they share the same migration route? ???

Less desirable food species - less overall harvest?
Less time in the ocean - possibly better for their survival if something in the ocean is killing them?

My $0.02
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Easywater on August 26, 2009, 10:00:57 AM
Sockeye spend 2 years in the lake they spawned in then go out to sea & return 2 years later.
Pinks have a 2 year life cycle and head out to sea shortly after being spawned.

The 2 returning stocks migrated to sea in the same year but the time of the year when they move out to sea is different.

Sockeye move out to the ocean in the spring & summer of their 2nd year in the lake.
Pink fry migrate in late February, about 6 months after spawning.

Could there be more lice present in May to July instead of February?

A few other tidbits of info:

Upstream migration may be disrupted if adults encounter hydrocarbon concentration exceeding 1-10 parts per billion.

In the last 2 cycles, most of the Pinks have been travelling up the North Arm of the Fraser instead of the normal South Arm.
(90% in 2007, 70% in 2005)

Could this be an indication that the South Arm is more polluted?

In the early 1920s (or 1913 depending on where you look), a major landslide at Hell's Gate, a treacherous obstacle on the Fraser River, prevented virtually all pink salmon from migrating to their short spawning streams. Since then, pink salmon have returned in catchable numbers only in odd-numbered years, swinging south around Vancouver Island on their approach from the open Pacific.

An attempt was made by DFO to have Pinks return to Jones Creek in the 1960's but it was not successful.

Someone told me that seals are not interested in Pinks.
They only go after female Sockeye and only eat the bellies - where the roe is stored.

There is an incredible amount of information on all salmon at this link:
http://books.google.ca/books?id=I_S0xCME0CYC&pg=PA137&lpg=PA137&dq=%2Bmigration+%2B%22pink+salmon%22&source=bl&ots=_uzzuH3hhY&sig=rLsf_J1G4367pir8Z_oy6c6V-SM&hl=en&ei=cmKVStumCJPWlAfE0fyvDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4#v=onepage&q=%2Bmigration%20%2B%22pink%20salmon%22&f=false

Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: marmot on August 26, 2009, 12:07:03 PM
Yeah....seals hate pinks  :D

Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 26, 2009, 01:38:29 PM
In the last 2 cycles, most of the Pinks have been travelling up the North Arm of the Fraser instead of the normal South Arm.
(90% in 2007, 70% in 2005)

Could this be an indication that the South Arm is more polluted?

Where are those percentages from?

In the early 1920s (or 1913 depending on where you look), a major landslide at Hell's Gate, a treacherous obstacle on the Fraser River, prevented virtually all pink salmon from migrating to their short spawning streams. Since then, pink salmon have returned in catchable numbers only in odd-numbered years, swinging south around Vancouver Island on their approach from the open Pacific.

An attempt was made by DFO to have Pinks return to Jones Creek in the 1960's but it was not successful.

That's not correct. While the landslide created a geographical barrier for pink salmon that spawn in the Mid Fraser River, it does not explain the dominance of the odd year runs. For several reasons:

The Lower Fraser River, downstream from the landslide, makes up most of the spawning habitat for pink salmon.
The difference in odd and even year runs is a result of the two-year life cycle.
The odd year dominance is not limited to the Fraser River population, but also many other systems in Southern BC.

Salmon run size is cyclical. While human impact has a large contribution in the health of a population, it fluctuates naturally due to a number of biotic (predation, food availability) and abiotic (climate, ocean current) factors throughout their life cycle. It maybe low one cycle, then high on the next, it's not always a grim downward trend. A good example is the difference between the 1999 (lowest) and 2001 (highest) pink salmon runs.

The difference between run sizes of pink and sockeye salmon is influenced by many factors. First of all, any commercially important fish species like sockeye salmon have been experiencing population declining for obvious reasons. Once sockeye salmon are gone, pink salmon will experience the same trend as there will still be a demand for fresh seafood. This downgrade of harvestable commercial species is seen everywhere on this planet, such as shifting from cod and flatfish to less desirable species like rays and shark.

Interior salmon species are more at risk than coastal salmon species. The more interior the natal streams are (early Fraser River chinook salmon, early Stuart sockeye salmon), the more threatened they are due to travel distance for both adult spawners and outmigrating juveniles. Pink salmon are generally coastal spawners, travel distance for juvenile from stream before undergoing smoltification is short, therefore mortality is much lower.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 26, 2009, 01:51:48 PM
Wednesday, August 26, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Wednesday, August 26 to discuss fisheries management plans for the harvest of pink salmon.

At the meeting today the run size estimates of 175,000 Early Summer-run, 650,000 Summer-run, 60,000 Birkenhead, and 450,000 True Late-run sockeye were unchanged. Present assessments indicate that Fraser River pink salmon are tracking abundance levels exceeding their 75% probability level forecast of 12,490,000 fish.

The Panel announced the following regulations for Panel Area waters directed at the harvest of pink salmon:

CANADIAN FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Remain closed to fishing.

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

TREATY INDIAN FISHERY:

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: Open to net fishing from 5:00 a.m., Friday, August 28, 2009 to 8:00 a.m. Saturday, August 29, 2009. All sockeye caught are for ceremonial and subsistence use only.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: As previously announced, open to drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Wednesday, August 26, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Saturday, August 29, 2009. All sockeye caught are for ceremonial and subsistence use only.

NON INDIAN FISHERY:

Area 7: Open to purse seines for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Thursday, August 27, 2009.

Area 7: Open to gillnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Thursday, August 27, 2009.

Area 7A: Open to purse seines for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 3:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., Thursday, August 27, 2009.

Area 7: Open to gillnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 3:00 p.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Thursday, August 27, 2009.

Areas 7 and 7A: As previously announced, open to reefnets for pink salmon with nonretention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Wednesday, August 26, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Thursday, August 27, 2009; and from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, August 28, 2009.

(Note: U. S. Non-Treaty fishers should check the U.S. hotline and WDFW regulations before fishing as there are additional State of Washington regulations, including time restrictions that may be in effect).

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on August 28, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Easywater on August 26, 2009, 03:19:26 PM
Darn, I started a long post then my connection crapped out for some reason.

I got the Hell's Gate info from here: http://www.bcadventures.com/adventure/angling/protalk/reid/pinksalmon.phtml

In the early 1920s, a major landslide at Hell's Gate , a treacherous obstacle on the Fraser River, prevented virtually all pink salmon from migrating to their short spawning streams. Since then, pink salmon have returned in catchable numbers only in odd-numbered years, swinging south around Vancouver Island on their approach from the open Pacific. In mid-island waters, pink return in both even- and odd-numbered years, while on the northern coast of British Columbia, pink return to short coastal streams in even-numbered years.

The ratio of North Arm to South Arm migration was told to me by a very knowledgable fisherman.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 26, 2009, 03:32:00 PM
Darn, I started a long post then my connection crapped out for some reason.

I got the Hell's Gate info from here: http://www.bcadventures.com/adventure/angling/protalk/reid/pinksalmon.phtml

In the early 1920s, a major landslide at Hell's Gate , a treacherous obstacle on the Fraser River, prevented virtually all pink salmon from migrating to their short spawning streams. Since then, pink salmon have returned in catchable numbers only in odd-numbered years, swinging south around Vancouver Island on their approach from the open Pacific. In mid-island waters, pink return in both even- and odd-numbered years, while on the northern coast of British Columbia, pink return to short coastal streams in even-numbered years.

The first part of that paragraph is correct as I mentioned in the previous post, but it's not the reason that resulted in the dominance of odd and even year pink salmon runs across BC. My understanding is that the trend is the product of a much longer process than just in the last century.

The ratio of North Arm to South Arm migration was told to me by a very knowledgable fisherman.

Ah, I thought maybe there was some sampling data that I was not aware of. It's based on angler observation then. No disrespect, knowledgable or not, observation by anglers has some merit but is not accurate enough to determine a trend conclusively because the observations are done inconsistently (what's going on at South Arm while he's at watching at North Arm?). I actually have seen the complete opposite in the past 7 seasons, that South Arm receives the bulk of the run while North Arm sees fewer fish travelling through. South Arm tends to get one mass migration in a short period of time (first two weeks of September) while North Arm consistently has fish moving in during every incoming tide from early August until late September.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on August 28, 2009, 09:32:17 PM
Friday, August 28, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, August 28 to review stock assessment data on the Fraser sockeye and pink salmon runs and discuss fisheries management plans for the harvest of pink salmon.

The marine migration of Fraser sockeye has been at low abundance levels over the past several days, while the marine migration of Fraser River pink salmon through the assessment areas has been increasing.

At the meeting today the run size estimates of 175,000 Early Summer-run, 650,000 Summer-run, and 60,000 Birkenhead sockeye were unchanged. The run size estimate of True Late-run sockeye was reduced from 450,000 to 400,000 fish. Present assessments indicate that Fraser River pink salmon are tracking abundance levels near or exceeding their 50% probability level forecast of 17,535,000 fish.

Fraser River environmental conditions are currently satisfactory for the migration of Fraser River sockeye and pink salmon.

The Panel announced the following regulations for Panel Area waters directed at the harvest of pink salmon:

CANADIAN FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Area 18-4: Opens for Area H troll ITQ fishery for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon 12:01 a.m. Sunday, August 30, 2009 until further notice (Please refer to DFO Fishery Notice for further details).

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

TREATY INDIAN FISHERY:

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: As previously announced, open to net fishing from 5:00 a.m., Friday, August 28, 2009 to 8:00 a.m. Saturday, August 29, 2009.

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: Open to net fishing from 5:00 a.m., Sunday, August 30, 2009 to 8:00 a.m. Monday, August 31, 2009 and from 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, September 1, 2009 to 8:00 a.m. Wednesday, September 2, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: As previously announced, open to drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Wednesday, August 26, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Saturday, August 29, 2009. Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: Extended for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Saturday, August 29, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Wednesday, September 2, 2009.

NON INDIAN FISHERY:

Area 7 and 7A: Open to purse seines for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Saturday, August 29, 2009; and 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday, August 31, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Area 7 and 7A: Open to gillnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight) Saturday, August 29, 2009; and 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Monday, August 31, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 7 and 7A: As previously announced, open to reefnets for pink salmon with nonretention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Wednesday, August 26, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Thursday, August 27, 2009; and from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, August 28, 2009.

Areas 7 and 7A: Open to reefnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Saturday, August 30, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Sunday, August 31, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday, August 31; and from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 1, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

(Note: U. S. Non-Treaty fishers should check the U.S. hotline and WDFW regulations before fishing as there are additional State of Washington regulations, including time restrictions that may be in effect).

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on Tuesday, September 1, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on September 02, 2009, 01:14:39 AM
Tuesday, September 1, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Tuesday, September 1 to review stock assessment data on the Fraser sockeye and pink salmon runs and discuss fisheries management plans for the harvest of pink salmon.

The marine migration of Fraser sockeye has been at low abundance levels over the past several days, while the migration of Fraser River pink salmon through the marine approach routes has been strong over the past week.

At the meeting today the run size estimates of 175,000 Early Summer-run, 650,000 Summer-run, 60,000 Birkenhead; and 400,000 True Late-run sockeye were unchanged. There is still considerable variability in run size assessments of Fraser River pink salmon since their peak migration timing through the marine approach routes is not yet known. However, there has been a large assessed abundance of Fraser pinks that have migrated through Johnstone Strait and Juan de Fuca Strait over the past week. At the meeting today, the Panel approved the 50% probability level forecast for Fraser River pink salmon of 17,535,000 fish for fisheries planning purposes. Fraser River environmental conditions are currently satisfactory for the migration of Fraser River sockeye and pink salmon. However, the discharge of the Fraser River is tracking about 34% below average and the water temperature at Qualark Creek on August 31 was 17.9 oC which is 1.6 oC above average for this date.

The Panel announced the following regulations for Panel Area waters directed at the harvest of pink salmon:

CANADIAN FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Area 18-4: As previously announced, open for Area H troll ITQ fishery for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon until further notice (Please refer to DFO Fishery Notice for further details).

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

TREATY INDIAN FISHERY:

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: As previously announced, open to net fishing from 5:00 a.m. Tuesday, September 1, 2009 to 8:00 a.m. Wednesday, September 2, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: Extended for net fishing from 8:00 a.m., Wednesday, September 2, 2009 through 11:00 a.m., Saturday, September 5, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: As previously announced, open for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Saturday, August 29, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Wednesday, September 2, 2009.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: Extended for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Wednesday, September 2, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Saturday, September 5, 2009.

NON INDIAN FISHERY:

Area 7 and 7A: Open to purse seines for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Thursday, September 3, 2009; and 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, September 4, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Area 7 and 7A: Open to gillnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 10:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight) Thursday, September 3, 2009; and 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Friday, September 4, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 7 and 7A: As previously announced, open to reefnets for pink salmon with nonretention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 1, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 7 and 7A: Open to reefnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Wednesday, September 2, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Thursday, September 3, 2009; and 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, September 4, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

(Note: U. S. Non-Treaty fishers should check the U.S. hotline and WDFW regulations before fishing as there are additional State of Washington regulations, including time restrictions that may be in effect).

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on Friday, September 4, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Iris on September 02, 2009, 10:12:23 AM
This may help with the discussion about why pinks haven't been affected (yet) as much as sockeye.

First, the pinks that are returning this fall went to sea in 2008, not in 2007 with this years' sockeye.  But second, after nine years of studying this it is my strong impression that our wild salmon runs now succeed or fail based on what the fish farmers are doing.  In general, the fish farmers are de-lousing their fish very early in the year to prevent public reaction to the lice infections on young pink salmon.  But the drug they use (Slice) only works for 6-8 weeks.  This means that the pinks and chums that migrate past the fish farms in March - May have low infection rates, but the sockeye that run past the same fish farms in June are not protected as lice levels start to rise again once the drug wears off.  Watch the film on this site by Twyla Roscovich to see what the young sockeye looked like in 2008 around these farms.

I realize it is hard to accept that fish farms killed all the missing Fraser sockeye, but the picture we are getting coast wide certainly points to something very specific. Dr. Brian Riddell of the Pacific Salmon Foundation has been quoted saying he thinks these fish vanished between the river and the open ocean.  What about disease? There have been sweeping disease epidemics in salmon farms on this coast (Download IHNV_report_2003) and currently throughout the salmon farmed areas of the world (Global Spread of ISA)

source: http://alexandramorton.typepad.com/

Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on September 04, 2009, 12:22:59 PM
Friday, September 4, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, September 4 to review stock assessment data on the Fraser sockeye and pink salmon runs and discuss fisheries management plans for the harvest of pink salmon.

The migration of Fraser sockeye through Johnstone Strait and Juan de Fuca Strait is nearing completion while the marine migration of Fraser River pink salmon through these areas has been generally strong over the past two weeks. At the meeting today the run size estimates of 175,000 Early Summer-run, 650,000 Summer-run, 60,000 Birkenhead, 400,000 True Late-run sockeye, and 17,535,000 Fraser River pink salmon (which is their 50% probability level forecast) were unchanged.

On September 3 the Fraser River discharge at Hope was approximately 1,900 cms, which is about 30% lower than normal and slightly higher than the historic minimum discharge on this date. The water temperature of the Fraser River at Qualark Creek on September 3 was 19 0C, which is 3 0C higher than average for this date. Fraser River water temperatures are expected to decline as cooler, wetter weather is forecast for much of the Fraser River watershed. The Panel announced the following regulations for Panel Area waters directed at the harvest of pink salmon:

CANADIAN FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Area 18-4: As previously announced, open for Area H troll ITQ fishery for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon until further notice (Please refer to DFO Fishery Notice for further details).

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

TREATY INDIAN FISHERY:

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: As previously announced, open for net fishing from 8:00 a.m., Wednesday, September 2, 2009 through 11:00 a.m., Saturday, September 5, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: Extended for net fishing from 11:00 a.m., Saturday, September 5, 2009 through 11:00 a.m., Wednesday, September 9, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: As previously announced, open for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Wednesday, September 2, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Saturday, September 5, 2009.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: Extended for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Saturday, September 5, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Wednesday, September 9, 2009.

NON INDIAN FISHERY:

Area 7 and 7A: As previously announced, open to purse seines for pink salmon with nonretention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, September 4, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Area 7 and 7A: Open to purse seines for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday, September 7, 2009; and from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 8, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Area 7 and 7A: As previously announced, open to gillnets for pink salmon with nonretention of sockeye salmon from 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Friday, September 4, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Area 7 and 7A: Open to gillnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 10:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight) Monday, September 7, 2009; and 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Tuesday, September 8, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 7 and 7A: As previously announced, open to reefnets for pink salmon with nonretention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, September 4, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 7 and 7A: Open to reefnets for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Saturday, September 5, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Sunday, September 6, 2009; 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday, September 7, 2009; and from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 8, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

(Note: U. S. Non-Treaty fishers should check the U.S. hotline and WDFW regulations before fishing as there are additional State of Washington regulations, including time restrictions that may be in effect).

The next in-season meeting of the Panel is scheduled to occur on Tuesday, September 8, 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on September 11, 2009, 01:26:34 PM
Friday, September 11, 2009

The Fraser River Panel met Friday, September 1 to review stock assessment data on the Fraser sockeye and pink salmon runs and discuss fisheries management plans for the harvest of pink salmon.

The migration of Fraser sockeye through Johnstone Strait and Juan de Fuca Strait is nearing completion while the marine migration of Fraser River pink salmon through these areas has been generally strong for the past few weeks. At the meeting today the run size estimates of 175,000 Early Summer-run, 650,000 Summer-run, 60,000 Birkenhead, 400,000 True Late-run sockeye. The run size estimate for Fraser River pink salmon was increased from the 50% probability level forecast of 17,535,000 fish to 19,500,000 fish.

On September 10 the Fraser River discharge at Hope was approximately 2,100 cms, which is about 17% lower than normal. The water temperature of the Fraser River at Qualark Creek on September 10 was 16.3 0C, which is 1.2 0C higher than average for this date. The Panel announced the following regulations for Panel Area waters directed at the harvest of pink salmon:

CANADIAN FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Area 18-4: Closes to Area H troll ITQ fishery for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon at 8:00 p.m., Friday, September 11, 2009 (Please refer to DFO Fishery Notice for further details).

Area 18-1, 18-4, and 18-11 and Area 29-1 to 6: Open to Area H troll ITQ fishery for pink salmon with non-retention of sockeye salmon from 12.01 a.m. Saturday, September 12, 2009 to 11:59 p.m., Friday, September 18, 2009. Fishery may close earlier, subject to by-catch concerns. (Please refer to DFO Fishery Notice for further details).

Area 29-1, 29-4, 29-6: Open to Area B purse seine ITQ fishery in waters deeper than 50 meters from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. daily on Sunday September 13, 2009, Monday, September 14, 2009, Tuesday, September 15 2009, and Wednesday, September 16 2009. Fishery may close earlier, subject to by-catch concerns. (Please refer to DFO Fishery Notice for further details).

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

4B, 5, and 6C: Relinquish regulatory control effective 12:01 a.m., Tuesday, September 15, 2009.

TREATY INDIAN FISHERY:

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: As previously announced, extended for net fishing from 11:00 a.m., Wednesday, September 9, 2009 through 11:00 a.m., Saturday, September 12, 2009 southerly and easterly of a straight line drawn from the Iwersen’s Dock on Point Roberts in the State of Washington to the Georgina Point Light at the entrance to Active Pass in the Province of British Columbia.

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: Extended for net fishing from 11:00 a.m., Saturday, September 12, 2009 to 9:00 p.m. Monday, September 14.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: As previously announced, extended for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Wednesday, September 9, 2009 to 12:00 p.m. (noon) Saturday, September 12, 2009.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: Extended for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Saturday, September 12, 2009 to 11:59 (midnight), Monday, September 14, 2009.

NON INDIAN FISHERY:

Area 7 and 7A: The previously announced purse seine fishery for pink salmon that was to occur from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, September 11, 2009, has been cancelled.

Area 7 and 7A: The previously announced gillnet fishery for pink salmon that was to occur from 8:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. (midnight), Friday, September 11, 2009 has been cancelled. Areas 7 and 7A: The previously announced reefnet fishery for pink salmon that was to occur from 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday, September 11, 2009 has been cancelled.

(Note: U. S. Non-Treaty fishers should check the U.S. hotline and WDFW regulations before fishing as there are additional State of Washington regulations, including time restrictions that may be in effect).

This was the final scheduled in-season meeting of the Panel in 2009.
Title: Re: 2009 Fraser River sockeye updates
Post by: Rodney on September 14, 2009, 03:16:38 PM
Saturday, September 12, 2009

The Fraser River Panel announced the following regulations for United States Panel Area waters:

UNITED STATES FRASER RIVER PANEL AREA WATERS:

Areas 6, 7, and 7A: The previously announced net fishery that was scheduled to close at 9:00 p.m. Monday, September 14, 2009 will now close at 9:00 p.m., Sunday, September 13, 2009.

Areas 4B, 5 and 6C: As previously announced, open for drift gillnets from 12:00 p.m. (noon), Saturday, September 12, 2009 to 11:59 (midnight), Monday, September 14, 2009.

This was the final scheduled in-season meeting of the Panel in 2009.