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Author Topic: Catch and release, a good practice?  (Read 684 times)

Rodney

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Catch and release, a good practice?
« on: September 16, 2020, 11:57:29 AM »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWCWtzN57OE

In my previous video, I talked about the current Fraser River situation, my values when it comes to fishing as well as some thoughts on First Nationsí Fishery practices. While I always do my best to be diplomatic and unbiased, these are still my perspectives after all so it is always good to listen to what others have to say. 300+ comments later, Iíd say that Iíve learned quite a bit more!

Here is another video which I would love all of you to check out. While fishing in the Yukon Territory a few weeks ago, we had a chance to have a conversation with Brandy Mayes, who is a land steward for the First Nation. In this video, Kitty has a chance to learn more about Brandyís fishing stories, as well as her views on sport fishing, catch and release practices from the First Nationsí perspectives.

Many thanks to Dennis Zimmermann from Respect for Fish for setting up this opportunity. Dennis is a passionate advocate on fishery conservation and has been the bridge between First Nations and the recreational fishing sector in the Yukon Territory for many years.

Lets hear your thoughts.

wildmanyeah

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Re: Catch and release, a good practice?
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2020, 12:34:46 PM »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWCWtzN57OE

In my previous video, I talked about the current Fraser River situation, my values when it comes to fishing as well as some thoughts on First Nationsí Fishery practices. While I always do my best to be diplomatic and unbiased, these are still my perspectives after all so it is always good to listen to what others have to say. 300+ comments later, Iíd say that Iíve learned quite a bit more!

Here is another video which I would love all of you to check out. While fishing in the Yukon Territory a few weeks ago, we had a chance to have a conversation with Brandy Mayes, who is a land steward for the First Nation. In this video, Kitty has a chance to learn more about Brandyís fishing stories, as well as her views on sport fishing, catch and release practices from the First Nationsí perspectives.

Many thanks to Dennis Zimmermann from Respect for Fish for setting up this opportunity. Dennis is a passionate advocate on fishery conservation and has been the bridge between First Nations and the recreational fishing sector in the Yukon Territory for many years.

Lets hear your thoughts.

What is the population of Yukon 2019?

40,854 people
In 2019, the estimated population of Yukon was 40,854 people

Total population by Aboriginal identity and Registered or Treaty Indian status, Yukon, 2016 Census. In 2016, there were 8,195 Aboriginal people

Yukon River Basin size   330,000 square miles (850,000 km2)

Chilliwack/Population

83,790

Pop. As of the 2016 census, the population of the Lower Mainland totals 2,759,385: 295,934 in the Fraser Valley Regional District.

Total population by Aboriginal identity and Registered or Treaty Indian status, Chilliwack BC  2016 Census. In 2016, there were 9585 Aboriginal people
Total population by Aboriginal identity and Registered or Treaty Indian status, Abbotsford - Mission BC  2016 Census. In 2016, there were 9755 Aboriginal people

Fraser River Basin size   220,000 km2 (85,000 sq mi)


« Last Edit: September 16, 2020, 12:53:24 PM by wildmanyeah »
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skaha

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Re: Catch and release, a good practice?
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2020, 03:36:16 PM »

-- I guess my answer is in the form of a question...how does one evolve without going through the steps. Yes, we may be able to skip a few of the steps through education, but how does one become an ethical steward of the resource. I contend we have to understand what practices will or are likely to cause irrevocable damage. Further, we have to first determine sustainable harvest within an acceptable time frame.  Is it one generation or several, again considering irrevocable damage. The "harvest" allocation is a different matter.  C&R is just a form of a harvest that can be measured in terms of impact thus does should not be treated as being more or less reverent or valuable than any other harvest. What we need to concentrate on is first identifying escapement numbers then allocation.
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Blood_Orange

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Re: Catch and release, a good practice?
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2020, 07:53:08 PM »

What do you mean? Not sure what you're trying to say with all the stats!

What is the population of Yukon 2019?

40,854 people
In 2019, the estimated population of Yukon was 40,854 people

Total population by Aboriginal identity and Registered or Treaty Indian status, Yukon, 2016 Census. In 2016, there were 8,195 Aboriginal people

Yukon River Basin size   330,000 square miles (850,000 km2)

Chilliwack/Population

83,790

Pop. As of the 2016 census, the population of the Lower Mainland totals 2,759,385: 295,934 in the Fraser Valley Regional District.

Total population by Aboriginal identity and Registered or Treaty Indian status, Chilliwack BC  2016 Census. In 2016, there were 9585 Aboriginal people
Total population by Aboriginal identity and Registered or Treaty Indian status, Abbotsford - Mission BC  2016 Census. In 2016, there were 9755 Aboriginal people

Fraser River Basin size   220,000 km2 (85,000 sq mi)
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