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Author Topic: An interesting read:  (Read 1321 times)

Tylsie

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Re: An interesting read:
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2018, 02:42:14 PM »

thanks, that was interesting. I have heard before that the huge numbers of pinks released have had negative affects, but that was largely because of the arrival time. They are basically released right into the feeding grounds while fish from BC, Washington and Oregon must travel great distances. This is the first time I have read that they directly compete for food sources from the start.
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Jk47

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Re: An interesting read:
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2018, 05:02:56 PM »

Me too, makes some sense. I also was not aware that all the different salmon species had such varying diets. Although I have heard that sockeye have such red meat b/c of all the krill they consume
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psd1179

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Re: An interesting read:
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2018, 06:28:33 PM »

It does not make sense. a century ago, the salmon population is significant higher, fish also were larger. no food shortage.

The commercial fishing wiped out salmon food, not the hatchery
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GordJ

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Re: An interesting read:
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2018, 08:55:40 PM »

Remember that salmon have dominant run years and lean years. It is no different than farmers leaving their fields fallow to allow them to replenish. The article states that hatchery output has remained stable for 30 years which means that no part of the habitat has a chance to renew. Not the streams vegetation or insect or or the estuary habitat or the ocean itself.
 I understand that fish size is decreasing (anecdotal) which will be blamed on genetics but the easiest way to increase animal size is to feed them. Of course it is political suicide to suggest that the 5 billion fish released every year be reduced.
At least, this is my uneducated opinion.
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wildmanyeah

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Re: An interesting read:
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2018, 09:36:59 PM »

Remember that salmon have dominant run years and lean years. It is no different than farmers leaving their fields fallow to allow them to replenish. The article states that hatchery output has remained stable for 30 years which means that no part of the habitat has a chance to renew. Not the streams vegetation or insect or or the estuary habitat or the ocean itself.
 I understand that fish size is decreasing (anecdotal) which will be blamed on genetics but the easiest way to increase animal size is to feed them. Of course it is political suicide to suggest that the 5 billion fish released every year be reduced.
At least, this is my uneducated opinion.

Pretty accurate assesment

People used to say when the avg size of fish in a run was small that it was going to be a big run. Now it's just small fish and small runs. I read an article somewhere about chinook where it explained the bigger the fish need exponentially more food. As in it's not a linear relationship of size/food needs.

IE if a 5 pound fish needs to eat a pound of food a week, a 6 pound fish of the same type my need to eat 2 pounds of fish a week and a 7 pound fish may need to eat 5 pounds of fish a week.
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RalphH

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Re: An interesting read:
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2018, 10:24:30 PM »

It does not make sense. a century ago, the salmon population is significant higher, fish also were larger. no food shortage.

The commercial fishing wiped out salmon food, not the hatchery

terribly oversimplified.
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"Never force conversation on a stranger. They are probably there just to fish and find solitude. If you ask a question or 2 and receive only answers...and no attempt to keep the conversation going, gracefully follow the implied suggestion and leave the angler alone"
               from " Courtesy and Safety"; Morris and Chan on Fly Fishing Lakes by Brian Chan and Skip Morris

RalphH

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Re: An interesting read:
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2018, 10:28:31 PM »

Remember that salmon have dominant run years and lean years. It is no different than farmers leaving their fields fallow to allow them to replenish. The article states that hatchery output has remained stable for 30 years which means that no part of the habitat has a chance to renew. Not the streams vegetation or insect or or the estuary habitat or the ocean itself.
 I understand that fish size is decreasing (anecdotal) which will be blamed on genetics but the easiest way to increase animal size is to feed them. Of course it is political suicide to suggest that the 5 billion fish released every year be reduced.
At least, this is my uneducated opinion.

best I know the dominant run cycle is associated not with the ocean environment but the freshwater rearing environment. Take the Adams River run - when the 1913 Hellsgate Railway slide all but wiped out the run the dominant year switched to the subsequent year cycle.
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"Never force conversation on a stranger. They are probably there just to fish and find solitude. If you ask a question or 2 and receive only answers...and no attempt to keep the conversation going, gracefully follow the implied suggestion and leave the angler alone"
               from " Courtesy and Safety"; Morris and Chan on Fly Fishing Lakes by Brian Chan and Skip Morris

Jk47

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Re: An interesting read:
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2018, 07:08:24 AM »

terribly oversimplified.
PSD pretty typically makes vague, unfounded and blanket statements on this forum, Iíve noticed.  ::)
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joshhowat

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Re: An interesting read:
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2018, 07:29:26 AM »

It does not make sense. a century ago, the salmon population is significant higher, fish also were larger. no food shortage.

The commercial fishing wiped out salmon food, not the hatchery

A century ago there was a lot more feed plus better habitat. This made a lot of big salmon.

We have destroyed our oceans. I donít care how many hatchery brats you release. Fish population will still decline, the main problem being it hurts our wild rivers. Leaving us with a few hatchery rivers on life support.

Our current fishing is trash, if you donít know that you never experienced good fishing.
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wildmanyeah

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Re: An interesting read:
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2018, 09:54:53 AM »

Its thoes damn whales eating all the bait
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