Fishing with Rod Discussion Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Author Topic: Curious... What size of Chinook ?  (Read 5398 times)

wildmanyeah

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1687
Re: Curious... What size of Chinook ?
« Reply #15 on: September 17, 2019, 11:23:40 AM »

Another aspect of survivability I've wondered about is time of day that the salmon move once they're back in the river.  I wonder if some are predisposed to mostly swim during the day and some predisposed to move at night.

I've noticed that there seems to be a good number of Coho reach the hatchery over night, and that there seem to be more difficult to catch during the day.
If we're continuing to harvest day-swimmers in the river, and a higher percentage of night-swimmers are getting to spawn, we are likely interfering with that aspect mix in the local Coho populations.

Somewhat along the lines of what the hatchery concluded about Steelhead and time of year they return.

There was a good article posted a few years back about Kanaka creek coho and their spawning habits. During the day they hide in deep pools or under banks and then in the night they would migrate into tributaries less then a food deep and spawn.

I would imagine they do this to avoid Dufus!
« Last Edit: September 17, 2019, 11:25:53 AM by wildmanyeah »
Logged

BladeKid

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 650
Re: Curious... What size of Chinook ?
« Reply #16 on: September 18, 2019, 04:21:31 PM »

There was a good article posted a few years back about Kanaka creek coho and their spawning habits. During the day they hide in deep pools or under banks and then in the night they would migrate into tributaries less then a food deep and spawn.

I would imagine they do this to avoid Dufus!

Coho are by far the most elusive salmon when it comes to visual observations of them. There are notorious for being difficult to enumerate on just about any system due to taking cover under just about anything they can find... it is not uncommon for stock assessment biologists/technicians to carry walking sticks or poles so that they can scare out coho from undercuts banks for enumeration.
Logged