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Author Topic: Get your facts straight?  (Read 1334075 times)

Fisherbob

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Easywater

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Re: Get your facts straight?
« Reply #3483 on: April 20, 2022, 03:29:14 PM »

https://civileats.com/2020/12/07/some-first-nations-are-fighting-fish-farms-in-british-columbia-to-protect-their-waters-and-cultures/

Still, support for the farms among community members is mixed.

“The hereditary chiefs and Chief of Council work for Cermaq. They protect the company. They are getting rich off of it, but Ahousaht is poor,” says Len John, an Ahousaht member who runs a small boat charter and water taxi company. “We, the people, don’t see that money. We have homeless people, elders with homes that are gutted, with no running water.”
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Novabonker

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Fisherbob

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wildmanyeah

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Re: Get your facts straight?
« Reply #3488 on: April 22, 2022, 12:21:05 PM »

https://www.canada.ca/en/fisheries-oceans/news/2020/12/measures-to-phase-out-salmon-farming-in-the-discovery-islands-area.html

yeah this is the area that was supported by the cohen commission and also an area where first nations don't want them.

I support the removal in this area
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wildmanyeah

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Re: Get your facts straight?
« Reply #3489 on: April 22, 2022, 12:23:17 PM »

https://www.mindbodyhealth.com/farmed-raised-salmon-toxic-junk-food/

Spot prawns

http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=spotshrimp.printerfriendly


Status
Shrimp are an important component of Alaskan marine ecosystems. They once supported large and historically important commercial fisheries in the late 1950s through the early 1980s, particularly in the central and western Gulf of Alaska. Recent commercial harvests are much smaller in volume and are predominantly from Southeast Alaska.

Pot fisheries targeting spot shrimp have historically occurred in protected embayments, largely in Southeast Alaska and to a lesser extent in Prince William Sound. The pot fisheries in Southeast Alaska grew rapidly in the 1990s and are now capped at about 800,000 ib. with most of the harvest being taken in southern and central Southeast. Pot fishing in Prince William Sound had been closed since the early 1990s due to low stock abundance. This fishery reopened in 2010. Spot shrimp fisheries in Southeast Alaska are largely stable.

Trends
The spot shrimp fishery on the West Coast of North America, extending from Alaska to California, has great potential to be an exception to the ecological and social destruction that typifies many shrimp fisheries. This potential is a function of several factors:

the ecological sensitivity of spot prawns and their critical habitat has been recognized and reflected in most of the fishery’s management
the fishery is primarily a community-based fishery, with a great deal of fisher involvement in management
the high-value and expanding markets for spot prawn product lead to a greater “value” placed on the conservation and sustainability of the species
managers commonly recognize that constant refinement and improvement of the management system is a prerequisite for long-term sustainability
Threats
Shrimp—harvested in the wild or produced via aquaculture—are generally characterized as among the most unsustainable of all global fisheries. Destructive fishing methods, vast quantities of bycatch, loss of habitat, and coastal pollution are only a few of the serious environmental and social problems that have been associated with the wild harvest and aquaculture of shrimp. Yet shrimp is also one of the fastest-growing and most lucrative global and domestic seafood markets.

Unfortunately, the vast majority of shrimp consumers do not know that the unsustainable production and harvest of shrimp is devastating ecosystems and local communities. Moreover, they have no way of identifying or ordering sustainably produced shrimp in a restaurant or supermarket. There is a critical need to establish an ecologically certified, sustainable shrimp fishery that can be used to educate consumers, shift seafood demand to more ecologically sound products, and dramatically reduce demand for unsustainably produced seafood.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2022, 12:30:36 PM by wildmanyeah »
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Novabonker

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Re: Get your facts straight?
« Reply #3490 on: April 24, 2022, 02:43:11 PM »

Spot prawns

http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=spotshrimp.printerfriendly


Status
Shrimp are an important component of Alaskan marine ecosystems. They once supported large and historically important commercial fisheries in the late 1950s through the early 1980s, particularly in the central and western Gulf of Alaska. Recent commercial harvests are much smaller in volume and are predominantly from Southeast Alaska.

Pot fisheries targeting spot shrimp have historically occurred in protected embayments, largely in Southeast Alaska and to a lesser extent in Prince William Sound. The pot fisheries in Southeast Alaska grew rapidly in the 1990s and are now capped at about 800,000 ib. with most of the harvest being taken in southern and central Southeast. Pot fishing in Prince William Sound had been closed since the early 1990s due to low stock abundance. This fishery reopened in 2010. Spot shrimp fisheries in Southeast Alaska are largely stable.

Trends
The spot shrimp fishery on the West Coast of North America, extending from Alaska to California, has great potential to be an exception to the ecological and social destruction that typifies many shrimp fisheries. This potential is a function of several factors:

the ecological sensitivity of spot prawns and their critical habitat has been recognized and reflected in most of the fishery’s management
the fishery is primarily a community-based fishery, with a great deal of fisher involvement in management
the high-value and expanding markets for spot prawn product lead to a greater “value” placed on the conservation and sustainability of the species
managers commonly recognize that constant refinement and improvement of the management system is a prerequisite for long-term sustainability
Threats
Shrimp—harvested in the wild or produced via aquaculture—are generally characterized as among the most unsustainable of all global fisheries. Destructive fishing methods, vast quantities of bycatch, loss of habitat, and coastal pollution are only a few of the serious environmental and social problems that have been associated with the wild harvest and aquaculture of shrimp. Yet shrimp is also one of the fastest-growing and most lucrative global and domestic seafood markets.

Unfortunately, the vast majority of shrimp consumers do not know that the unsustainable production and harvest of shrimp is devastating ecosystems and local communities. Moreover, they have no way of identifying or ordering sustainably produced shrimp in a restaurant or supermarket. There is a critical need to establish an ecologically certified, sustainable shrimp fishery that can be used to educate consumers, shift seafood demand to more ecologically sound products, and dramatically reduce demand for unsustainably produced seafood.


Strike prawns from the menu. A family member used to drop a few tubs of spot prawns off to us now and again. I haven't bought them in years.
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IronNoggin

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Re: Get your facts straight?
« Reply #3491 on: April 25, 2022, 01:29:06 PM »

From Tradex Foods:

This week we report on the dying Pacific Salmon populations in British Columbia Canada, as the political chaos within Canadian fisheries management over open-net Farmed Atlantic Salmon and Wild Pacific Salmon make international headlines. In 2021, only 660,000 Pacific Salmon were commercially harvested in B.C. waters compared to over 40 million Salmon in 1991 - which is over 30 years ago, when DFO was first alerted that Wild Salmon in B.C. might be in trouble. Take a look at this exclusive clip of what Alexandra Morton, (a Canadian Biologist who has studied Pacific Salmon for the last thirty years) had to say about recent headlines relating to DFO's suppression of the virus research.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RU69uVinpAQ
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Fisherbob

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IronNoggin

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Re: Get your facts straight?
« Reply #3493 on: April 26, 2022, 01:50:34 PM »


Former federal Fisheries and Oceans Minister Bernadette Jordan breached the rights of B.C. salmon farmers to procedural fairness when she ordered all salmon farms out of the Discovery Islands, a Federal Court judge has ruled.

https://www.timescolonist.com/local-news/federal-court-overturns-order-to-shut-down-salmon-farms-5299534

In light of all the information coming forward regarding intentional government cover-ups of the negative impacts of these farms, I consider this a serious setback.

And yet another nail in the coffin for our own salmon stocks...

Sad Day

Nog
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Fisherbob

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Re: Get your facts straight?
« Reply #3494 on: April 27, 2022, 07:33:35 AM »

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