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Author Topic: 2019 Chilliwack River fall salmon fishery information & water condition updates  (Read 58834 times)

bobby b

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Better make peace with it as its only going to get worse. More and more immigrants are flooding the lower mainland and so logically fishing pressure will only increase

Why straight to immigrants on the reason for increased fishing pressure?
Would not increased pressure also come from those among the existing population  that introduce friends, kids etc to the sport too?

British Columbiaís population growth rate (+1.4%) in 2017/2018 was among the lowest in the last seven years

Moreover... interprovincial migration also does not indicate huge influx.

Over the past year, the largest interprovincial migration flow was from Alberta to British Columbia (24,453 migrants). The flow in the other direction, i.e., from British Columbia to Alberta, involved 20,904 migrants and was the second largest interprovincial migration flow. When taken into account, these exchanges between the two provinces result in a gain of 3,549 for British Columbia.

Not exactly 'flooding' in...

Btw...growth numbers growth extend to the entire province.
The number of fishermen/women among this new populace would likely be a small percentage...
Increased pressure on any given system is the result of a number of variable factors....itís not likely you would see a significant 'immigrant' increase on any given local river.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2019, 08:38:30 PM by bobby b »
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AaronWilde

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We are all immigrants at some point in our history. Probably even the Natives crossed the land bridge from Asia long ago. I never said anything ill about immigrants. Its simple math that as more people pack into the lower mainland fishing pressure will only get worse and not better (to those complaining about rivers being busy).

Canada is growing and the lower mainland is a hot spot. I see lots of people who are fairly new to Canada out fishing. Sure some kids and other random people will get into fishing, and so will older people stop fishing. The population isn't growing from having babies, it's growing from immigration. Even +1.4% of 5 million a year in BC is 70 000 people (a quick google search from BC's government website shows that BC went from 4 million people in 1999, to 5 million people in 2018), and lots of those will go to big cities IE lower mainland. Not to mention the student visas we have living here. The Canadian government reports that more than 150,000 international students were enrolled in public and private post secondary institutions, elementary and secondary schools and private language training schools in B.C. in 2017. This represents nearly one quarter of all international students studying in Canada. No wonder we have a rental crisis in Vancouver (*hides*)!


I fish a lot and I fish all over the place, and there is definitely more people new to Canada fishing! And also more existing population that were recently introduced to fishing too. I've bumped into quite a few this fall, from under both categories, and I kindly and respectfully talk to them both about etiquette, and try to educate them on hatchery vs wild, etc, as none of them have known that they can't keep wild or trout (I probably didn't know the difference when I was new either).

All that being said, as Rodney and others have mentioned, you can usually hike away from the crowds, or simply fish with them. I've joined the gong shows at KWB before and it was actually pretty fun in its own community social fishing sort of way. Lots of regulars yelling OOOOO BOYYYYYY! It was good times 8)
« Last Edit: November 20, 2019, 10:48:34 AM by AaronWilde »
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RalphH

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Since 2011 the population of BC has increased by about 550,000 people or about 12.5%. The Fraser Valley grew by about 6.6 from 2011 to 2017.  It seems reasonable to expect that participation in a variety of activities such as sport fishing would be rising along with the population.

That angling license sales have also been declining suggests to me that the perception many of us have that angling pressure is increasing particularly in specific locales suggests that people who continue to buy licenses are fishing more intently and concentrating their efforts at specific times of the year
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...even the hero gets a bullet in the chest...

wildmanyeah

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People that want to fish want to catch fish. There is enough info now on the internet to make a new fishermen pretty successful. There is also enough information available about the area and times that have peak abundance and when you are most likely to limit out.

Chilliwack in October is one of Thoes places and itís only ever going to get busier.

Fall fishing previously was not hugely popular because lots of guys could fill their freezers by August. Now there is almost no opportunities for fishing till the fall run on hatchery salmon.

It is what it is
« Last Edit: November 20, 2019, 07:36:17 AM by wildmanyeah »
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psd1179

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no more salmon push in, but the net report shows steelhead caught

https://www-ops2.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fos2_Internet/Testfish/rptDTFD.cfm
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