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Author Topic: Draconian Fisheries Closures  (Read 21767 times)

IronNoggin

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #135 on: June 07, 2019, 04:13:41 PM »

FORTY-ONE FN in-river Openings to date on the most threatened runs of Chinook the Fraser has since Wilkinson imposed the restrictions.

http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fm-gp/fraser/docs/abor-autoc/UpperFraser/UMFPrevOpenTimes-eng.htm

https://www-ops2.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fraserriver/firstnations/HTMLs/CeremonialOpeningTimes_Previous.html

In addition to an ongoing full blown FN Troll Fishery (with no numbers cap) in Area G waters that the latter were forced off of due to "conservation concerns".

https://www-ops2.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fns-sap/index-eng.cfm?pg=view_notice&DOC_ID=221391&ID=all

And on top of that, the letter the Minister sent around today no longer even attempts to disguise the re-allocation aspect:

“In addition, new restrictions in commercial and recreational fisheries are intended to support increased availability of not at risk Summer 41 Chinook for First Nations fisheries harvest opportunities during August and September.”

https://www.sportfishingbc.com/forum/index.php?attachments/fraser-river-chinook-management-letter-june-2019-final-pdf.45727/

Rather obvious to anyone with eyes this is a complete travesty.

Nog
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Robert_G

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #136 on: June 07, 2019, 06:06:03 PM »

It was obvious what was going on the minute it happened. What is surprising how naïve people are here and the trust they misplace in corrupt people in government.
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CohoJake

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #137 on: June 07, 2019, 06:19:54 PM »

I'm sure you all saw this one: https://www.nationalobserver.com/2019/06/05/features/he-lives-share-his-salmon-faces-tighter-regulations-and-waning-fish-stocks

Pretty obvious the tribes are asking to take over commercial fishing, and DFO is obliging.  If I owned a commercial license, I would be suing DFO right about now.  FN may have a constitutional priority to ceremonial and subsistence fishing, but if their rights to commercial harvest also have priority, it makes a commercial license worthless.  I don't necessarily object to the idea of giving commercial licenses to FN only, but I think the existing license holders need to be bought out of something that is worthless through no fault of their own.

In Washington, 50% of harvest is allocated to treaty tribes, and that includes treaty commercial harvest.  At least having explicit agreements makes it clear what everyone is getting (or should be getting).
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wildmanyeah

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #138 on: June 07, 2019, 06:39:04 PM »

I'm sure you all saw this one: https://www.nationalobserver.com/2019/06/05/features/he-lives-share-his-salmon-faces-tighter-regulations-and-waning-fish-stocks

Pretty obvious the tribes are asking to take over commercial fishing, and DFO is obliging.  If I owned a commercial license, I would be suing DFO right about now.  FN may have a constitutional priority to ceremonial and subsistence fishing, but if their rights to commercial harvest also have priority, it makes a commercial license worthless.  I don't necessarily object to the idea of giving commercial licenses to FN only, but I think the existing license holders need to be bought out of something that is worthless through no fault of their own.

In Washington, 50% of harvest is allocated to treaty tribes, and that includes treaty commercial harvest.  At least having explicit agreements makes it clear what everyone is getting (or should be getting).

I did not, Thanks for sharing
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Hike_and_fish

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #139 on: June 07, 2019, 10:01:16 PM »

I hope they fish it to extinction. Honestly, most of them couldn't manage their way out of a wet paper bag
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wildmanyeah

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #140 on: June 08, 2019, 11:00:49 AM »

June 7, 2019
Via e-mail only
First Nations Chiefs, Councillors and Fisheries Representatives;
Sport Fishing Advisory Board
Commercial Salmon Advisory Board
Marine Conservation Caucus
Re: 2019 Fraser River Chinook Conservation Measures
On April 16, the Government of Canada announced new fisheries management measures to conserve
Fraser River Chinook (see news release: https://www.canada.ca/en/fisheriesoceans/news/2019/04/government-of-canada-takes-action-to-address-fraser-river-chinook-decline.html).
Following the announcement, the Department has received questions seeking further clarification on the
announced measures. This letter provides further information on the management approach, conservation
objectives and expected outcomes.
In November 2018, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) assessed the
status of 16 Southern British Columbia (BC) Chinook Designatable Units (DUs). Of these, 13 DUs are Fraser
River Chinook: 7 are assessed as Endangered, 4 as Threatened, 1 as Special Concern and only 1 was deemed
Not at Risk (for details see: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/committeestatus-endangered-wildlife/assessments/wildlife-species-assessment-summary-nov-2018.html). In
addition, productivity of many of these populations has declined to the point where fewer offspring are
returning compared to the parent generation and the populations will continue to decline even in the
absence of fishery mortalities unless conditions improve.
Concerns are particularly acute for Fraser River Chinook populations in the Spring 42, Spring 52, and
Summer 52 management units which contain most of the at risk stocks (i.e. 7 Endangered, 3 Threatened
and 1 Special Concern). These populations have been affected by very poor productivity, which has resulted
in steep declines in spawner abundance. For example, only 490 natural origin Chinook returned to the
Nicola River (which are in the Spring 42management unit) in 2018 from a parental generation of 7,122
Chinook. The poor return of wild origin Nicola Chinook in 2018 increases the concern that productivity for
Spring 52 and Summer 52 Chinook returning in 2019 could also be very poor as these fish went to sea in the
same year as Nicola Chinook and may have been exposed to similar freshwater and marine conditions.
DFO is taking the COSEWIC assessments very seriously and has announced highly precautionary fishery
restrictions intended to provide a high degree of protection to at risk Fraser Spring 42, Spring 52 and
Summer 52 Chinook returning in 2019. The management target is to reduce overall Canadian fishery
mortalities on these populations to near 5% (note: actual outcomes may vary around this target given
uncertainties in the data). Expected fishery mortalities are not intended to be a management target and
the objective is to allow as many fish to pass through to the spawning grounds as possible. Fishery impacts
are expected to include incidental Chinook mortalities in Fraser River Chinook and Sockeye test fisheries,
limited Chinook retention or bycatch retention in Fraser River First Nation FSC fisheries, release mortalities,
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wildmanyeah

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #141 on: June 08, 2019, 11:01:08 AM »

and incidental mortalities during Chinook-directed fisheries beginning after July 15. For Summer 41 and Fall
41, the precautionary fishery measures that have been announced are expected to substantially reduce
Canadian fishery mortalities on these management units by at least 25%.
Achieving these conservation objectives is our highest priority and requires significant actions in
commercial troll, recreational and First Nations fisheries in times and areas where at risk Fraser Chinook
may be encountered. Fraser Spring 42 and Spring 52 Chinook return to spawn from early March through late
July, with migration peaks in June through the lower Fraser River. Summer 52 Chinook have later timing and
return to the Fraser River to spawn from late June to August with a peak in late July.
While conservation of at risk Fraser Chinook is the primary objective in managing the resource, the
Department is also committed to respecting Constitutional and Treaty obligations to provide priority for
First Nations harvest opportunities for Food, Social and Ceremonial and Treaty obligations after
conservation requirements are met. Conservation measures will constrain First Nations Chinook harvest
opportunities while at risk Fraser Chinook or other stocks of concern (e.g. Early Stuart Sockeye) migrate
through fishing areas. Prior to July 15th, the Department is permitting very limited Fraser River FSC fishery
opportunities to harvest small numbers of Chinook for ceremonial purposes which is consistent with the
overall management objective for fishery mortalities near 5% for these stocks. In addition, new restrictions
in commercial and recreational fisheries are intended to support increased availability of not at risk
Summer 41 Chinook for First Nations fisheries harvest opportunities during August and September. These
restrictions include an extended closure of the commercial troll fishery in Northern BC until August 20
which is intended to pass through not at risk Summer 41 (South Thompson) Chinook that typically comprise
20-30% of troll harvests to the Fraser River. The Kamloops Lake commercial demonstration fishery targeting
South Thompson (Summer 41) Chinook will also be closed. Recreational salmon fisheries in southern BC will
remain at reduced limits of 1 Chinook per day after the Chinook non-retention period ends (i.e. after July 14
or July 31 depending on area) and recreational fisheries in the Fraser River will remain closed until at least
August 23.

A general summary of fisheries management measures for the 2019 fishing season are outlined below and
in tabular format in Appendix 1:
Commercial fishing: Commercial troll fisheries be Chinook non-retention until August 20 in Northern BC,
and will not open until August 1 on the West Coast of Vancouver Island to reduce impacts on Fraser
Chinook stocks to very low levels and to support salmon allocation priorities. The Kamloops Lake
commercial demonstration fishery targeting South Thompson (Summer 41) Chinook will be closed.
Recreational fishing: Management measures are identified where at-risk Chinook stocks may be
encountered, including:
• Non-retention of Chinook in Queen Charlotte Strait, Johnstone Strait and Northern Strait of Georgia
until July 14; a daily limit of one (1) Chinook per person per day from July 15 until August 29, and
two (2) Chinook per person per day from August 30 until December 31.
• Non-retention of Chinook in the Juan de Fuca Strait and Southern Strait of Georgia until July 31;
retention of one (1) Chinook per person per day from August 1 until August 29, and two (2) Chinook
per person per day from August 30 until December 31.
• West Coast Vancouver Island offshore areas (seaward of 1 nautical mile from the surfline) will have
non-retention of Chinook until July 14 followed by a limit of two (2) Chinook per day from July 15 to
December 31. West Coast Vancouver Island inshore waters will remain at two (2) Chinook per day.
• Fraser River recreational fisheries will remain closed to salmon fishing until at least August 23. After
that date, opportunities for species other than Chinook will be informed by in-season abundance
and other conservation issues (Coho, Steelhead, etc.). Reduced Fishing opportunities may be
3
provided in tributary areas during times and locations at-risk Chinook stocks would not be
encountered.
• An overall reduction in the total annual limit for Chinook that can be retained per person in tidal
waters from 30 to 10.
For up to date regulations in specific areas, please see our BC sport fishing guide online at:
http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fm-gp/rec/index-eng.html. .
First Nations fisheries: First Nations food, social and ceremonial fisheries and domestic harvest by treaty
nations will be restricted to Chinook non-retention until July 15 with the exception of limited opportunities
to harvest small numbers of Chinook for ceremonial purposes in the Fraser River until July 15. For
additional information on the limited First Nations fisheries opportunities that have been authorized in the
Fraser River please see: http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fm-gp/fraser/abor-autoc-eng.html.
The 5 Nations (Ahousaht, Ehattesaht, Hesquiaht, Mowachaht/Muchalaht, and Tla-o-qui-aht) rights-based
commercial fishery will be delayed until July 15 in areas seaward of 1 nautical mile from the surfline on the
West Coast of Vancouver Island. Fishing may be authorized in areas shoreward of 1 nautical mile from the
surfline. Information on openings will be posted by fishery notice at: https://www-ops2.pac.dfompo.gc.ca/fns-sap/index-eng.cfm.
The Department encourages anyone who observes a violation—including suspicious activity and possible
impacts to fish or marine ecosystems—to contact the toll-free 24-hour Observe, Record and Report (ORR)
line at 1-800-465-4336. Reports made to the ORR line are forwarded immediately to fishery officers. To
report a fisheries violation, more information is also available on DFO’s web-site: http://www.pac.dfompo.gc.ca/fm-gp/rec/ORR-ONS-eng.html.
An assessment of the effectiveness of these management measures will be completed in the post-season.
For the management units that have coded wire tag (CWT) indicators, Canadian fishery mortalities will be
used to assess performance against the management objectives. However, current CWT indicators are not
available to project fishery mortalities for the Spring 52 and Summer 52 Chinook. As a result, information on
run timing, historic CWT recoveries, and genetic stock identification was used to implement measures in
times/areas where these stocks may be encountered. A planned Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat
(CSAS) review of the available information to quantify impacts of commercial, recreational and First Nations
fisheries on Fraser Chinook, including Spring 42, Spring 52 and Summer 52 Chinook, is planned for review in
July 2019, which is anticipated to provide a methodology that can be used to assist with assessing the
fishery impacts for these stocks in the post-season.
Despite the difficulties expected from these new fishery management measures, they are necessary to
respond to the serious declines in these important Fraser Chinook populations. The challenges facing at-risk
Fraser River Chinook salmon stocks are multi-faceted. The road to recovery requires a long-term view and
the collaboration of First Nations, multiple levels of government and all interested parties. DFO will be
following up with First Nations, the Province of BC and stakeholders to establish a process to address a
broad range of issues that are impacting Chinook stocks, including: land and water use issues; fish habitat
issues; the role of hatcheries to support rebuilding and the potential for mark-selective fisheries targeting
hatchery-origin fish; how predation by seals and sea lions may be affecting Chinook salmon; and other
concerns. Establishing a process to have these important discussions will play a vital role in determining
how best to steward this resource going forward and what options may exist to further address the social,
cultural and economic importance of these Chinook stocks. This will require everyone to work toward
identifying mutually-beneficial solutions and ensuring conservation objectives are met to provide for future
opportunities. Further information will be provided on this process in the near future.
4
The Department would like to acknowledge the strong commitment to conserving Fraser Chinook
populations expressed by all First Nations, recreational and commercial harvesters and thank you for your
cooperation to protect and rebuild these important populations for the future.

DFO Pacific Salmon Management Team
DFO.PacificSalmonRMT-EGRSaumonduPacifique.MPO@dfo-mpo.gc.ca.
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IronNoggin

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #142 on: June 08, 2019, 11:57:31 AM »


Victor says salmon was once so abundant, there would be three or four fish barbeques in the community every weekend throughout summer.


And they wonder where the fish went??

“I can tell you, our value on the fish is much more than any recreational or commercial fish they catch,” he said.

So the fish sold roadside out of the back of a truck is more valuable than troll or recreational caught? Really??

But if they catch one fish that’s Fraser-bound, that’s enough. You compromise the constitutional priority, in my mind.”

Locked down the entire South Coast damn near, while recognizing the majority of those fisheries had no impact.
Under threat that they would fish the stocks of concern into extinction should they not get their way.
And now whine for even more...

Victor says that to uphold constitutional priority, DFO shouldn’t allow any fisheries, catch-and-release or otherwise, until after Indigenous fisheries have theirs.

He also says that Canada should consider giving control of commercial fishing to Indigenous Peoples, who have fished the same populations for millennia.


Bottom Line: We want it ALL, and we want it NOW!   :(

https://www.nationalobserver.com/2019/06/05/features/he-lives-share-his-salmon-faces-tighter-regulations-and-waning-fish-stocks
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rln

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #143 on: June 08, 2019, 10:32:05 PM »


Victor says salmon was once so abundant, there would be three or four fish barbeques in the community every weekend throughout summer.


And they wonder where the fish went??

“I can tell you, our value on the fish is much more than any recreational or commercial fish they catch,” he said.

So the fish sold roadside out of the back of a truck is more valuable than troll or recreational caught? Really??

But if they catch one fish that’s Fraser-bound, that’s enough. You compromise the constitutional priority, in my mind.”

Locked down the entire South Coast damn near, while recognizing the majority of those fisheries had no impact.
Under threat that they would fish the stocks of concern into extinction should they not get their way.
And now whine for even more...

Victor says that to uphold constitutional priority, DFO shouldn’t allow any fisheries, catch-and-release or otherwise, until after Indigenous fisheries have theirs.

He also says that Canada should consider giving control of commercial fishing to Indigenous Peoples, who have fished the same populations for millennia.


Bottom Line: We want it ALL, and we want it NOW!   :(

https://www.nationalobserver.com/2019/06/05/features/he-lives-share-his-salmon-faces-tighter-regulations-and-waning-fish-stocks
Maybe DFO should just let Victor fish like usual. That way when he gill nets the last one out of his traditional power skiff, he will then have nothing left for the future generations of First Nations to fish for. Problem will have been solved.
The rest of society then can do habitat and enhancement work in other streams that don’t drain into the Fraser River and have a sport fishery and commercial fishery on those stocks.
Interesting how too many First Nations appear to want to live like it’s still the time period before the European settler arrived and also have all the amenities of the 21 first century.
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Hike_and_fish

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #144 on: June 09, 2019, 06:22:20 AM »

Maybe DFO should just let Victor fish like usual. That way when he gill nets the last one out of his traditional power skiff, he will then have nothing left for the future generations of First Nations to fish for. Problem will have been solved.
The rest of society then can do habitat and enhancement work in other streams that don’t drain into the Fraser River and have a sport fishery and commercial fishery on those stocks.
Interesting how too many First Nations appear to want to live like it’s still the time period before the European settler arrived and also have all the amenities of the 21 first century.

^ this
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RalphH

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #145 on: June 09, 2019, 07:52:20 AM »



In Washington, 50% of harvest is allocated to treaty tribes, and that includes treaty commercial harvest.  At least having explicit agreements makes it clear what everyone is getting (or should be getting).

Well hind sight is always 20/20. I remember when the courts ruled on the Treaty rights (there was no agreement) in Washington State and sport anglers, there and here, acted as if the sky had fallen. Several years later the SCOC clarified what FN rights are here in BC. Jake while in the recent past you've written about the down side of having an allocation vs the tiered system with the ultimate priority being conservation, here in BC it is  clear many anglers wish we had what you have. Better to have 50% of almost nothing than nothing at all (LOL). Still I don't recall anyone in the BC angling community back in the 70s and 80s saying we need to make a fair deal we can all live with to the protect the future of the sport. Far from it, I heard a lot of other reprehensible things but never that.

Once again the sport angling community is looking to the wrong people to lead it and aiming for it's foot. There is no way the current issue can be won with the kind of false and hateful rhetoric smeared over internet chat sites or Facebook pages. As usual the entire angling community looks like a bunch of buffoons.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2019, 09:09:24 AM by RalphH »
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wildmanyeah

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #146 on: June 09, 2019, 08:32:43 AM »

Maybe DFO should just let Victor fish like usual. That way when he gill nets the last one out of his traditional power skiff, he will then have nothing left for the future generations of First Nations to fish for. Problem will have been solved.
The rest of society then can do habitat and enhancement work in other streams that don’t drain into the Fraser River and have a sport fishery and commercial fishery on those stocks.
Interesting how too many First Nations appear to want to live like it’s still the time period before the European settler arrived and also have all the amenities of the 21 first century.

Victor is just a lieir

"“Last year, I had literally no fish at all,” he says, citing short supply and high prices.

In the past, his stepbrother and nephew have given him fish to smoke through the winter. Last year, two friends sold him fish at a lower price.

“Because they’re such good friends, they took a loss on their sales,” he said. “They knew how much I relied on it and needed it… They are literally life savers.”"

So despite Lower fraser First nations harvesting 400,000 sockeye for FSC he did not receive any for his smokehouse? because they ended up on the market because
prices were high? is that what he is saying? Where did the 30 thousand chinook, 40 thousand coho and 75 thousand chum end up? Perhaps he's better off having a conversation with his chief then DFO.



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StillAqua

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #147 on: June 09, 2019, 08:45:33 AM »


Once again the sport angling community is looking to the wrong people to lead it and aiming for it's foot. There is no way the current issue can be won with the kind of false and hateful rhetoric smeared over internet chat sites or Facebook pages. As usual the entire angling community looks like a bunch of buffoons.

I agree. At best, the false or misleading attacks are ignorant. At worse, they are inciting hate against FNs. Yes, FNs have a constitutionally protected right to FSC salmon that you don't have.  It's part of the how our society evolved over the last 250 years. Grow up and get over it. FSC fisheries aren't the problem.

DFO is trying to manage Chinook and multistock fisheries while wedged between COSEWIC assessments for Chinook and orcas, US-Canada salmon treaty co-management issues and SCOC guaranteed Aboriginal Fisheries rights, against a background of declining Chinook ocean survivals. Nobody is happy and everybody has lost something. Which usually means it's a reasonable compromise.
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Hike_and_fish

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #148 on: June 09, 2019, 10:52:32 AM »

The Steelhead numbers are interesting. Where were they headed ? The Stien ? Nahatlatch? Chehalis?  Big Silver ? The Thompson? Or some other small system that once held Steelhead. Did they make it ? Who knows. Hopefully they did.
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IronNoggin

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Re: Draconian Fisheries Closures
« Reply #149 on: June 09, 2019, 11:31:53 AM »

... Which usually means it's a reasonable compromise.

And if that is your assessment of the overall situation in the matter under discussion, I will simply have to assume you either do not understand all of the background, or have become rather delusional. Perhaps sipping a little too much of ol' Ralphie Boy's Kool Aid??

Nog
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