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Author Topic: Winter steelheading 101  (Read 10196 times)

Spawn Sack

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #45 on: December 23, 2017, 05:03:40 PM »

You did wash your hands right?

Honestly no. I was totally unprepared! But now I carry a little hotel bar of soap in with my wipes. Have not had to use it since "the incident" but I like knowing that I'm prepared if the unexpected happens. :o

I did manage to hook one steelhead that day after my pinch-bum-shuffle to the woods. Gives new meaning to the term "stink bait." ;D
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chromeo

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #46 on: December 25, 2017, 01:19:44 PM »

How do ppl figure fishing popular rivers that your not gonna get low holed?  I grew up fishing amongst others and share waters freely.  Plenty of fish to go around and if you catch a fish or get to a spot before me congratulations.  I enjoy watching someone enjoy the fight as much as i do.  Ive caught many many steelhead and learned its egos and self entitled attitudes killing the sport of steelheading more than low holeing.
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Spawn Sack

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #47 on: December 25, 2017, 02:19:18 PM »

How do ppl figure fishing popular rivers that your not gonna get low holed?  I grew up fishing amongst others and share waters freely.  Plenty of fish to go around and if you catch a fish or get to a spot before me congratulations.  I enjoy watching someone enjoy the fight as much as i do.  Ive caught many many steelhead and learned its egos and self entitled attitudes killing the sport of steelheading more than low holeing.

Hmmmm...I think you are missing the point.

I suppose there are different schools of thought on low holing. I personally feel it's rude and unacceptable, and if I arrive on a run and another angler(s) are already there I will always walk above him/her/them and start my first drift there. I like the idea that someone posted earlier in this discussion that in some case they will ask to fish ABOVE someone. I probably would not bother doing this on a busy lower river run, but if it was a more secluded run, especially a short one, I plan to adopt the practice of asking the person(s) if they mind if I drop in above them. It all boils down to respect, courtesy, manners.

The other school of thought seems to be "you don't own the river, and I can fish where I want." There is no law prohibiting low-holing, so if you are a low-holer then you are well within your rights to do so. Be warned though, you aren't going to make any friends and no one is going to give you a sniff of info, no one will loan you their pen to mark your license if you forgot yours, and so on, you get the idea.

The following is not my story, a buddy told it to be years ago, but it illustrates my point.

He was fishing a somewhat secluded run. People know about it, but it's a ways out of the way. My friend is by himself nearing the bottom 1/3rd of the run. Suddenly another angler appears out of the treeline, and heads right for the tail out. No nod, no can I cut in below you I'm short on time, nothing. A few drifts in the guy hooks into a big steelhead, buddy guessed 15lbs. As you might imagine he is pissed as he stood a good chance of hooking this fish as he was closing in on the tail out.

Now my buddy is a super nice guy. Normally he would reel in, put down his rod, and walk down and offer to help the guy land the fish. But he thought, nah, deal with it yourself. I would have done the same thing. So the guy has the fish more or less played out and puts his rod down and tries to grab the leader and deal with the fish (not sure if it was hatchery or wild). Well the fish snookered him and took off!! :D ;D As it took off the rod and reel went for a ride along the rocks/gravel. Buddy said it was all he could do not to burst out laughing as the guys center pin bounced off rocks and went into the river. The guy managed to grab his rod before it went in the drink and now is back playing it again. Snap! Fish breaks him off and is now gone. If that was not bad enough, my friend said after this the guy had his spool off and is examining his reel with concern. Likely got debris in his bearings or something like that. He left without a word.

Morale of the story is often you need a hand on the river, and you will not find many or any volunteers if you are a jerk.

Seems many people assume the ethics/expectations of steelheading are the same as fall salmon fishing. They are not. At the end of the day - fish however you like as long as it's legal.
« Last Edit: December 25, 2017, 02:29:48 PM by Spawn Sack »
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GordJ

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #48 on: December 25, 2017, 06:13:37 PM »

I would like to point out that the vast majority of people fishing in the Lower Mainland have no idea that there is a protocol for fishing. They donít go online, they donít hang out at Fredís, they donít subscribe to SS and T and they have no idea that they low holed you. I have fished with some very experienced still water anglers were are shocked when I called them fence posts because they had never heard of rotational angling. There is a huge difference between ignorance and rudeness.
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Silex-user

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #49 on: December 25, 2017, 07:11:09 PM »

Fence post fisherman? you know how heavy for them to carry that big rock to run/pool and to stand on to fished? ;D of course they are going stand there all day. :



Silex user
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bobby b

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #50 on: December 25, 2017, 08:27:14 PM »

All hope is not lost.

Was out the other day and had a run to myself.  Two guys showed up and went below me, but before casting, one turned to me and asked "ok if we fish down here"?  i replied that it was fine but i'd be making my way through there as I was working my way down the run. They both said ok no prob we will go above you and follow you through the run.
Even though I said OK they still fished behind me...  Respect!    This was on the Vedder too.

In the past I woulda been pissed as they headed for the low hole....life is too short though, I dont mind so much anymore....last year I consistently caught Steelies while fishing behind others.
Cover water and work through the run a few times and move on.



Merry xmas everyone and good luck out there.
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Stantonius

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #51 on: December 25, 2017, 10:38:22 PM »

Here's my new way of thinking when someone/s cut into my run. I will say first though, that if they hook a steelie right below you it's hard to keep this frame of mind, but here it is...  I too use to get upset when people would just walk in and start hitting the prime water that you so patiently have worked towards, but what has helped is to change my mindset and start observing where they're putting their offerings and then working the pockets, riffles and water they haven't. For example, if they're dropping 5-10ft in front, then go farther out, if they're hitting the middle or far bank, then fish right in front, and if it looks like they're hitting everything, they're not because your presentation will always be different. If they're treading hard and disturbing water, then slow your speed down the run, and look for a boulder or drop because the fish are likely to come your way and sit there. There's many more strategies you can take when observing a person/s ahead of you, and I'm sure this is nothing new to many of you, but it makes hitting water behind someone a great mental challenge and it's quite satisfying when you hook into a fish right where the person that low holed you was fishing :)
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Tylsie

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #52 on: December 26, 2017, 12:10:24 PM »

I have a question about low holing. A few years ago there used to be a series of runs (long gone now I believe) that were basically a maybe 20 - 25 yard long pools divided by maybe 10 yards of shallows then another hole. There was about 4 of these in a row for maybe 100yds total. Now, would these be considered 4 separate holes so that if a person was just about 2/3rds of the way down one you could jump into the one below and not be low holing? Would they all be considered one hole (Run) or just leave if you are going to enter below a person leave a  pool between you. In short, how much of river does a person claim before being low-holed?
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Fish Assassin

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #53 on: December 26, 2017, 12:53:09 PM »


 In short, how much of river does a person claim before being low-holed?

That is an excellent question. One would think from reading some of the posts that everyone should start at the Limit Hole and work their way down. :P
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poper

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #54 on: December 26, 2017, 01:55:29 PM »

I have a question about low holing. A few years ago there used to be a series of runs (long gone now I believe) that were basically a maybe 20 - 25 yard long pools divided by maybe 10 yards of shallows then another hole. There was about 4 of these in a row for maybe 100yds total. Now, would these be considered 4 separate holes so that if a person was just about 2/3rds of the way down one you could jump into the one below and not be low holing? Would they all be considered one hole (Run) or just leave if you are going to enter below a person leave a  pool between you. In short, how much of river does a person claim before being low-holed?

If thereís 4 holes in a 100yard stretch, you start at the top and fish all 4 in a row, then walk back up and go threw again if you want to, thatís what I would do, but if your fishing the vedder, look for a guy that hooked a fish, then cut in just below him, throw your old bag of roe and coffee cup on the shore, fire up a joint, crack a beer, throw the can in the river, if no action, head back to the truck and throw all your garbage bags out at the first pull off after tamihi, crack a beer and drive back down to lower part of the river and repeat.   :)
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bobby b

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #55 on: December 26, 2017, 03:05:16 PM »

Your mixing A-holing and Lo-holing ....which sometimes i s'pose could be the same thing..
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Jk47

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #56 on: December 26, 2017, 05:59:31 PM »

Hereís my rule of thumb: if you canít make out what Iím saying if I were to shout upriver at you as loud as I can, Iím probably safe to fish below you. If the spot i want to fish is within ear shot to hold a reasonable conversation then thatís exactly what Iíll do if I think youíre posting - start up a conversation and ask if youíre fishing through or staying put and if you wouldnít mind if I went below you.
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Spawn Sack

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #57 on: December 26, 2017, 07:35:18 PM »

Alright I think we have flogged low-holing to death :o

Haters are gonna hate, and low-holders are gonna low-hole. That's just how it is. If you don't want to low-hole someone/anyone, and are worried you might be low-holing other anglers, my advice would be "when in doubt - go above." It just takes a minute. If they are fence posting or moving very slow, then ask to pass them and carry on your way. It's courtesy and common sense - don't over think it.

I'll chuck in another tip not directly related to tackle or presentation etc. Cold hands! It's hard to fish if your digits are frozen, especially with a center pin reel...that ice cold metal disc in direct contact with your rod hand - oh my! Obviously some sort of gloves are in order, I like fingerless wool. Any type of full finger gloves are a bit of a pain I find as you get poor feel on the reel, and hard to find gloves with enough friction on the reel for hooksets. When the temp drops I do two extra things to keep my hands/fingers warm. First take a hot-pocket and place on each wrist, right on your veins. Don't do the wrist cuffs up too tight as they need air circulation to stay warm. The hot pockets will warm the blood going to your hands. Noticeable difference. The second tip I like if it is raining. I'll wear a pair of black nitrile gloves under my fingerless wool gloves. They cut the wind just enough to make a difference vs bare skin, and your skin does not get wet/damp. Yeah you sweat a bit from the inside, but I find not so noticeable in the cold. If it's raining and not that cold out I'll sometimes go just nitrile gloves and no wool fingerless over them. Don't wear the blue gloves. They are thin and tear easily, plus you look like a bit of a prostate examining weirdo IMO ::)
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Noahs Arc

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #58 on: December 26, 2017, 09:31:08 PM »

I have a question about low holing. A few years ago there used to be a series of runs (long gone now I believe) that were basically a maybe 20 - 25 yard long pools divided by maybe 10 yards of shallows then another hole. There was about 4 of these in a row for maybe 100yds total. Now, would these be considered 4 separate holes so that if a person was just about 2/3rds of the way down one you could jump into the one below and not be low holing? Would they all be considered one hole (Run) or just leave if you are going to enter below a person leave a  pool between you. In short, how much of river does a person claim before being low-holed?

To me, on the Vedder if thereís a tail out between us itís all good. On other systems, if I can see you youíre too close.

Edit: if I walk into a juicy run on the Vedder and nobody is around, I will fish the meat and potatoes right away quickly before moving to the head.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2017, 09:33:51 PM by Noahs Arc »
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Apennock

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Re: Winter steelheading 101
« Reply #59 on: January 01, 2018, 12:40:34 PM »

Could one of you veteran steelheaders sheíd some light on the best time of day to target steelhead?

Iíve always been unsure whether to shoot for sunrise/sunset like salmon or midday for higher water temp like a feeding trout?
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