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Author Topic: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water  (Read 1263 times)

aquapaloosa

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #15 on: December 02, 2017, 09:38:19 PM »

Nice deflection. Doesn’t wash. Show me your evidence that’s it’s deadly to wild salmon as the article states. I’m waiting.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8E_zMLCRNg
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Chicken farm, pig farm, cow farm, fish farm.

chris gadsden

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2017, 04:32:23 AM »

He also said,
  "Dunn said there’s no way to know that the PRV in the samples came from the fish blood, rather than the ocean water collected, since the virus has been known to exist in both. “Is the PRV in their sample coming from the plant or the ocean? I can’t know that.”
Who does Dunn work for? :-X

Dave

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #17 on: December 03, 2017, 07:30:39 AM »

Try to keep up Chris. As you will see below, PRV has been here a long time.


"Salmonid tissues tested for PRV by real-time rRT-PCR included sections from archived paraffin blocks from 1974 to 2008 (n = 363) and fresh-frozen hearts from 2013 (n = 916). The earliest PRV-positive sample was from a wild-source steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), from 1977. Archived paraffin samples from 1974 to 1994 were from the histology laboratory of the Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada. Blocks were selected to include a range of years and a mixture of farmed salmon and salmonids sampled from the wild or from enhancement hatcheries. Records related to many of these samples are incomplete, but in all cases, the year of sample collection is known. In some cases, tissues from a single fish seem to be distributed in more than one paraffin block, but these records are also unclear; therefore, prevalence for these samples is based on the known number of paraffin blocks rather than the unknown number of fish. As an estimate of the preservative that was used, tissue colouration was recorded when the paraffin sections were processed for rRT-PCR analysis: yellow (probably Bouin's fixative) or normal (probably Davidson's fixative); during these years, the Pacific Biological Station did not use 10% neutral buffered formalin (W. Bennett, DFO, personal communication)."
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Novabonker

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #18 on: December 03, 2017, 11:03:54 AM »

Nice deflection. Doesn’t wash. Show me your evidence that’s it’s deadly to wild salmon as the article states. I’m waiting.

Well Mr. Science, take a few moments and deep breaths and consider viral mutations and the effects they can have on similar species.....

http://homepage.usask.ca/~vim458/advirol/SPCV/evolution/evolution.html
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shuswapsteve

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #20 on: December 04, 2017, 12:07:52 AM »

Well Mr. Science, take a few moments and deep breaths and consider viral mutations and the effects they can have on similar species.....

http://homepage.usask.ca/~vim458/advirol/SPCV/evolution/evolution.html

Grasping now.....Why not divine intervention as a possible cause?

I guess the answer is no. Shocker.
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Novabonker

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #21 on: December 04, 2017, 08:16:44 AM »

Grasping now.....Why not divine intervention as a possible cause?

I guess the answer is no. Shocker.

Grasping? Hardly.

http://genetics.thetech.org/about-genetics/mutations-and-disease
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Fisherbob

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #22 on: December 04, 2017, 08:44:09 AM »

It looks like some people can handle this news better than others :)
  "Scientists estimate that every one of us has between 5 and 10 potentially deadly mutations in our genes-the good news is that because there's usually only one copy of the bad gene, these diseases don't manifest."
« Last Edit: December 04, 2017, 08:46:17 AM by Fisherbob »
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GordJ

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #23 on: December 04, 2017, 09:03:48 PM »

Bob, you seem to be familiar with the processing of these fish and I wonder if you know why the discharge seems to be so bloody? When I clean a salmon without bleeding it I don’t see all that blood and the discharge looks like it is almost pure blood. I saw some scales but there were no identifiable “chunks” or parts in the flume so where does the blood and/or the intense red colour come from?
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Fisherbob

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #24 on: December 05, 2017, 07:17:17 AM »

Just taking a guess Gord that what is being seen is the discharge of the boat holding tanks after transporting the fish. Maybe they bleed the fish out.  I read somewhere that the guts from processing is used for fertilizer and other things. I could be totally wrong on this.
      “The industry has made other improvements, he said. In 2011, it began treating blood water and wastewater that came from the loading and transporting of fish. That water was previously discharged untreated.”
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Fisherbob

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #25 on: December 05, 2017, 09:20:39 AM »

Found this on youtube Gord. the fish hold looks very red and you can see a person cutting the gills.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glNSeDyPsjE

Then there is this method, Just kick them in there,,,,,,,,,ALIVE?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLzageuH7QY
« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 10:50:19 AM by Fisherbob »
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wildmanyeah

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #26 on: December 05, 2017, 11:20:27 AM »

Found this on youtube Gord. the fish hold looks very red and you can see a person cutting the gills.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glNSeDyPsjE

Then there is this method, Just kick them in there,,,,,,,,,ALIVE?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLzageuH7QY

Two wrongs don't make a right, Sure there are lots of other egregious acts that take place in the fishing industry. As other have pointing out dumping untreated sewage into the ocean is much worse.

More oversight and enforcement is clearly needed in the industry.  Company can't runoff silty water into creeks, yet the government fails to act when a rock/mud/logjam slide block off complete waterways.
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GordJ

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #27 on: December 05, 2017, 02:10:23 PM »

I know that when I catch a sockeye I cut the gills with a knife and let them bleed out in the net and they bleed quite a while. Live fish must pump the blood out but dead ones don’t and they must process the fish immediately so there’s quite a bit of blood. My first thought was that the video must have been enhanced but I couldn’t see it.
Okay, back to original programming.
How long can the virus survive in the water, outside of the fish?
« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 02:11:57 PM by GordJ »
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Dave

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RalphH

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Re: Greasy fish farms releasing infected blood water
« Reply #29 on: December 05, 2017, 03:22:36 PM »

“He said scientists from his department and Environment Canada are seeking clarity on the situation, including about test results Campbell says showed the bloody water was full of the piscine reovirus, a common virus in farmed salmon that is deadly to wild salmon.”

More fabrication and hyperbole from some media sources and activists.  There’s no evidence of this. If so, show it. Now.

Quote
deadly
ˈdedlē/
adjective
adjective: deadly; comparative adjective: deadlier; superlative adjective: deadliest

    1.
    causing or able to cause death.

so this virus does cannot cause disease that can kill salmon? please clarify.

Quote
HSMI is characterized by mortality that ranges from negligible up to 20%, and morbidity (defined as the percentage of fish with indications of disease) that can be as high as 100% within affected populations (Kongtorp et al. 2004a)

Thanks Dave. As usual both side make the other read  bilge water similar to what came out of the pipe. ;D
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 07:12:34 AM by RalphH »
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