Fishing with Rod Discussion Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Author Topic: Korkers  (Read 3471 times)

Spawn Sack

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 952
Korkers
« on: November 09, 2017, 02:18:06 PM »

So was thinking of buying a new pair of wading boots, was going to give Korkers a go. Was looking on their website at different models and, hey wait a minute they have some pretty sweet looking slip on soles that just might work! Maybe half the price of a new pair of Korker boots. Has anyone tried these?

Looking specifically at the "casttrax" "rocktrax" and "rocktrax plus"

http://www.korkers.com/footwear/fishing.html

I'd mainly want to use them for winter steelheading. I have 2 pairs of felt boots and I quite like them both; however, they both suck and are dangerous when the felt freezes and builds up with snow and ice!

I don't really want to buy new boots as I just got my Simms Guide boots re-felted and the boots themselves are in excellent condition. My backup Sedge boots are practically new and the felt is almost 100%. I only wear them when my Simms boots are out of commission getting re-felted or whatever. Nothing wrong with the Sedge boots but they are kind of floppy and unsupportive. The Simms boots are far superior in fit/comfort/support.

Curious if anyone has tried any of these Korker slip ons? And if so which one you'd recommend for winter wading on our local rivers. If they are a pain to get on/off, floppy when walking or whatever then I just bugger the idea and buy the complete boots.

Going by the product description I would be inclined to go with the Casttrax. It has 36 carbite studs. The Rocktrax has 28 studs but not carbite. The Rocktrax plus has 52 studs but not carbite.

 
Logged

cammer

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 172
  • I'm a llama!
Re: Korkers
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2017, 04:19:24 PM »

I will add this. I've met the guys in Portland and love the way they stand by there products,   I've used 3 models of there boots and had a few issues but those issues were responded to very very well. Overall a great shoe, great idea and I believe they have gotten much better along the way
Logged

Noahs Arc

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1141
Re: Korkers
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2017, 06:36:52 PM »

I have never owned Korkers, the only reason being I am very slightly knock kneed with flat feet and I wear out the inside toe section of my footwear fastest.

I am hesitant to buy these boots because of how the treads attach to the toe of the boot im afraid I would destroy that part it hooks into.

Maybe someone can chime in on this? Something for others to consider.
Logged

Spawn Sack

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 952
Re: Korkers
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2017, 07:22:21 PM »

I will add this. I've met the guys in Portland and love the way they stand by there products,   I've used 3 models of there boots and had a few issues but those issues were responded to very very well. Overall a great shoe, great idea and I believe they have gotten much better along the way

Yeah I recall a 3-4 years back when I bought my Simms guide boots the Korkers seemed like a bit of a risky buy. The guide boots have been AWESOME. Currently at Express Reel getting re-felted for the 3rd time. I've been doing them before steelhead season, the felt is worn right thin and I figure I need max grip in the winter. However last winter my felt froze half the time and I might as well be wearing skates! Fell lots on my rear. Never hurt myself but it's only a matter of time.

Seems Korkers has improved their quality and now I would not hesitate to buy a pair.

Not much I can really do with the felt except add studs, and when the felt freezes and builds up with snow/ice the studs are covered up and useless!

Time to get something with studded rubber.

 
Logged

Spawn Sack

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 952
Re: Korkers
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2017, 07:31:46 PM »

An observation from Korkers website:

When you buy a pair you get 2 pairs of soles and you have a choice here: You can get option A, which is Kling-on (rubber sole) and a separate pair of felt soles, or option B which is the Kling-on soles and a separate pair of studded felt soles.

The Kling-on soles are not going to grip worth a crap on ice, and the felts will also suck once they freeze and pack up. SO....if I buy a new pair of Korkers I will have to buy another pair of soles anyway. Something like the studded kling-on or the studded rubber.

http://www.korkers.com/footwear/soles-accessories.html

I read on another discussion on this site that the alumatrax are fantastic for wet wading on slimey rocks, but no good for ice.

Whatever sole I am wearing it needs to exel on both snow and ice.

I am leaning towards just getting a pair of the slip ons (probably the CastTrax) for my existing boots. Hoping to hear some reviews from someone who has them.

Buying a new pair of Korkers plus a new set of additional soles probably noth of $300 depending on which boots I go for. If the slip ons are good I see no reason not to buy them and slip over my existing comfy boots.
Logged

cammer

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 172
  • I'm a llama!
Re: Korkers
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2017, 01:59:32 AM »

Spawn,   if u buy Korkers,   take the rubber soles and drill small screws into them and there u go, instant ice cleats,,use flat head screws and place on pressure points. Done this for 3 years now
Logged

Spawn Sack

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 952
Re: Korkers
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2017, 11:36:01 AM »

Yaaaaaaa, I've done this with wading boots before using machine screws. Yeah they work I guess. I find the soft metal wears out quite fast. I have heard the carbide, while expensive, lasts much longer and has more bite on slippery surfaces compared to screws from the hardware store.

I think I'm going to go "all in" and get a new pair of Korkers and just buy an additional set of soles purposed for snow/ice/winter. Or I may go the budget route and just buy the Korker overshoes.

Reviews on Amazon are quite good.

https://www.amazon.ca/Korkers-CastTrax-Cleated-Overshoe-Large/dp/B004US0EZE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1510342502&sr=8-1&keywords=korker+casttrax
Logged

cammer

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 172
  • I'm a llama!
Re: Korkers
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2017, 03:13:25 PM »

Boa system or laces? Love Boa,   they totally stand behind their products too.. you'll love korkers. I have 3 years on my latest pair
Logged

Ambassador

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 333
Re: Korkers
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2017, 06:02:09 PM »

Boa system or laces? Love Boa,   they totally stand behind their products too.. you'll love korkers. I have 3 years on my latest pair
Not a fan of the Boa system - I like to go a bit extra tight across the top of the foot and you cant do that like you can with laces. Plus I had the Boa system fall apart on a pair of decent snowboard boots years ago - now pretty leery about them.

I'd also like to figure out a way to keep myself safe over the winter season - Crampons? Spikes?. Love my Simms Freestones - but they get pretty slippy once iced up.
Logged
"Perhaps fishing is, for me, only an excuse to be near rivers"
Roderick Haig-Brown

Spawn Sack

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 952
Re: Korkers
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2017, 08:12:59 PM »

Thanks for that. I don't like it either. Have tried on runners and boarding boots with similar system and not a fan.

My plan for max traction is to go Korkers and go with one of the following:

1- Get the CastTrax and slip them over my existing wading boots. + = lowest cost. CastTrasx look like they have insane grip/traction. - = Dealing with extra buckles. The possible sensation of wearing two pairs of boots on one foot. In other words, not that comfortable.

http://www.korkers.com/footwear/fishing/casttrax.html

2- Get Korker boots with the rubber sole, and additional studded rubber sole (comes with the boots). Wear the studded rubber in the winter + = Better comfort. No extra buckles and straps to fart with. - = studded rubber does not look nearly as grippy as the CastTrax. Possibly not enough grip for icy rocks and so on.

3- Get the Korker boots and buy the carbide studded rubber soles (that click into the boot) separately. + = max comfort. Max traction. - = A lot of $ up front.

http://www.korkers.com/footwear/soles-accessories/studded-rubber-sole.html

**It is also worth noting that the CastTrax slip ons have 18 carbide studs per sole. The "studded rubber sole" that clicks right into the boot has 14 carbide studs per sole. In other words, the CastTrax is likely to outperform the studded rubber sole in a max snow/ice grip test. Food for thought**
« Last Edit: November 10, 2017, 08:18:29 PM by Spawn Sack »
Logged

redside1

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 134
Re: Korkers
« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2017, 11:36:41 AM »

To sort of hijack the thread a little, Hodgman also had wade boots that come with multiple soles. They might be worth a comparison. I have a pair but have not had a chance to use them yet. Look pretty decent though. On an early model of Korkers I found them very narrow plus the sole popped often but that was a long time ago and I would guess their boots are much better now
Logged

RalphH

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1956
Re: Korkers
« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2017, 04:14:57 PM »

I bought one pair of Korkers and ended up getting three via warranty. They have issues with the uppers though the exchangeable soles now seen goof proof. I had one sucked off in mud but the back clip held it on so I didn't lose it. The cost of a pair of replacement soles is less than felt or vibram replacement. I did have a pair with Boas and on balance prefer laces as I found it possible to get a finer adjustment via old fashion laces. Boas sometimes tricky to disengage.
Logged
"Never force conversation on a stranger. They are probably there just to fish and find solitude. If you ask a question or 2 and receive only answers...and no attempt to keep the conversation going, gracefully follow the implied suggestion and leave the angler alone"
               from " Courtesy and Safety"; Morris and Chan on Fly Fishing Lakes by Brian Chan and Skip Morris

cammer

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 172
  • I'm a llama!
Re: Korkers
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2017, 04:20:34 PM »

Ralphy, good service from them hey? Was similar to my experience. That nub broke twice on me on the heel and they were very quick to replace, was happy with service
Logged

RalphH

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1956
Re: Korkers
« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2017, 05:33:21 PM »

Service was good but I went back to Simms. I figure the uppers should last longer than 13 months.
Logged
"Never force conversation on a stranger. They are probably there just to fish and find solitude. If you ask a question or 2 and receive only answers...and no attempt to keep the conversation going, gracefully follow the implied suggestion and leave the angler alone"
               from " Courtesy and Safety"; Morris and Chan on Fly Fishing Lakes by Brian Chan and Skip Morris

Every Day

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2149
Re: Korkers
« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2017, 09:01:14 PM »

I've been watching this thread and I should chime in!

Korkers are bomb proof, and pretty much the only modern boots I'll buy now. I've had my pair of Devil's Canyon's a full year now (and I bought them used). Have put a tonne of miles on them, and have had to buy replacement felts once already due to the number of miles on them. Easily 100+ trips on them already. Hardly any wear at all, besides a tiny bit on the neoprene that isn't notice-able.

A couple notes I do have though.

Someone had mentioned worrying about wrecking the inside toe of the front of the boot. Apparently I do the same thing, and I did end up ripping the rubber front of the boot up, which caused the bottom to pop out of the front constantly. I ended up super gluing it back together and haven't had problems since.

I had a few other pairs of earlier korkers. I did have problems with the soles popping off and the back nub getting broken off. Both issues seem to be fixed with the newer pairs - Kitty and I have not had a sole pop out or anything break on our two newest sets.

I'll second the no liking Boa's. This was the first time I had tried them, and I'd never get them again. I don't like how it tightens up (I like my boots tight, and Boa's just don't seem to sinch down the way I'd like, especially mid foot. I also don't like them in the winter. When you've been fishing a full day in negative temps without gloves (like I often do), it's damn near impossible to pop that button at the end of the day lol! I've had to delay taking my waders off a few times until I've been home to use my hands again!
Logged