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Author Topic: Fuel spill at Hell's Gate....  (Read 1574 times)

Tylsie

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Re: Fuel spill at Hell's Gate....
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2017, 09:57:05 PM »

Never said they don't leak. I know they do. I make my living repairing those leaks (or better hopefully preventing them). But the worst pipeline explosion in Canada killed 28 people, Or about half of those killed in the Lac-Megnantic. That was about 50 years ago, regulations and procedures have become much more strict.
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Old Blue

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Re: Fuel spill at Hell's Gate....
« Reply #16 on: November 26, 2017, 08:14:30 PM »

Never said they don't leak. I know they do. I make my living repairing those leaks (or better hopefully preventing them). But the worst pipeline explosion in Canada killed 28 people, Or about half of those killed in the Lac-Megnantic. That was about 50 years ago, regulations and procedures have become much more strict.
What side?  I'm in NDT for Integrity digs
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Tylsie

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Re: Fuel spill at Hell's Gate....
« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2017, 08:21:39 PM »

What side?  I'm in NDT for Integrity digs

Small World. I have done to occasional Integrity dig but try to stick to scanning new big inch (though that was not easy this year).
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Old Blue

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Re: Fuel spill at Hell's Gate....
« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2017, 09:09:05 PM »

Small World. I have done to occasional Integrity dig but try to stick to scanning new big inch (though that was not easy this year).
Definitely.  I started with new construction, much steadier action and more interesting work for me with Integrity and rotations usually.  Probably know a few people in common.  Sounds like you'll have a busier summer with numerous companies doing the Line 3 replacement at least.
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obie1fish

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Re: Fuel spill at Hell's Gate....
« Reply #19 on: November 29, 2017, 07:45:22 AM »

Just a thought: thinking about the placement of pipeline routes vs rail lines, which of the two tends to run beside or through more ecologically sensitive areas, such as rivers, lakes, etc.? Or, if the pipeline/rail line is transporting dangerous material (natural gas, etc.), which tends to go through population centres and other infrastructure, running the risk of fire or worse?
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Tylsie

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Re: Fuel spill at Hell's Gate....
« Reply #20 on: November 30, 2017, 12:33:53 PM »

Just a thought: thinking about the placement of pipeline routes vs rail lines, which of the two tends to run beside or through more ecologically sensitive areas, such as rivers, lakes, etc.? Or, if the pipeline/rail line is transporting dangerous material (natural gas, etc.), which tends to go through population centres and other infrastructure, running the risk of fire or worse?

To understand this, one must look at the history of Canada. Cities were built around railways. As such, much more of the population and infrastructure are exposed to rail. Further, Trains have take the path of least resistance. This means usually running along the edges of river (some times for 100s of Kms) and around lakes on the shore lines exposing them to more prolonged hazard. That being said, since cities and people followed the rail way and built along it much of the environmentally sensitive areas have been replaced, or are at least shells of their former selves, and are only occupied by animals that have adapted (coyotes, raccoons, and for the purposes of this forum Chum as other species of Salmon often have different requirements).

Pipelines, with the advances in technology, are able to go under a river, a lake, even a mountain. But this means they are able to punch straight through areas that would of been impossible to cross when the majority of railways in Canada were built. The areas that are often the last remaining vestiges of wilderness around. But the one saving grace is that once the pipeline is down, that is it. The areas are usually allowed to return to a relatively natural state. There is no constant human caused disturbance, no animals getting trapped in the tracks by huge snow banks while several thousands of tons bear down on them. But they are there, and are always flowing.
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Dave

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Re: Fuel spill at Hell's Gate....
« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2017, 04:34:19 PM »

That was a good read, thanks Tylsie :)
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