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Author Topic: Bass flies  (Read 539 times)

Apennock

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Bass flies
« on: May 06, 2017, 02:25:56 PM »

I'm hoping to do a bit of smallmouth fishing in the next couple of weeks but have never fished them on the fly before.  I figure Wooly Buggers are a safe bet, I was also thinking along the lines of a sneaky Pete and maybe tying up some Copper John's with extra long lets.  Am I on the right track?  Any recommendations?
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DanL

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Re: Bass flies
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2017, 04:35:53 PM »

I havent fished smallies in a while but used to do a yearly excursion to St Mary's on Saltspring back in the day.

When not chucking gear, the go to flies for us were leech patterns on type 1, 2, or 3 sink lines. I usuually went for a purple rabbit leech (super easy to tie), while my friend swore by a clown marabou leech. Also spun deer hair patterns or poppers when the conditions were right for surface action.
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RalphH

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Re: Bass flies
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2017, 05:28:05 PM »

Yes on the wooly buggers. Black, blue, olive, silver body with red hackle. Zonkers.

Borger Fleeing Crayfish: http://www.garyborger.com/2011/08/13/fleeing-crayfish/



one of best. Pheasant rump hackle can replace the long fur - in fact that was what Borger used on the original. Large gold bead chain for the head is cheaper than dumbell eyes.

Large dragon fly nymphs - smallies like big mouth fulls but if there is a smaller hatch standard trout patterns will work. Smallmouth behave much more trout like than largemouth.

If you want to have fun get some poppers or mouse patterns & toss them at the end of docks and boathouses. When it's on the bass will explode on them.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2017, 05:32:16 PM by RalphH »
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