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Author Topic: Can a river get too high?  (Read 1703 times)

mko72

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Can a river get too high?
« on: October 12, 2016, 09:38:03 AM »

Since we're expecting biblical level rain this weekend, when that happens can a river (like the Cap) get too high and fast for fish to go up?
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TNAngler

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Re: Can a river get too high?
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2016, 09:45:37 AM »

Yes, definitely.  You can look at Hell's Gate as an example.  Generally, they won't get near that level though.  At the same time though, if the river gets dirty enough or full or enough junk (think trees coming down regularly) fish might tend to stay outside longer.
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halcyonguitars

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Re: Can a river get too high?
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2016, 10:31:07 AM »

I think it might depend a bit on the size of the fish. The last rain we had put the Cap at about a 10' when the meter only goes to 8'.

Still, at the weir by the hatchery, you could see lots of fish trying to make the jump. Lots and lots.

And, you could see lots and lots of anglers standing right on the edge of the cliffs on slippery rocks where falling in means near certain death. Not quite sure what the technique is called when you have 5 feet of line out and just whirl it over and over through a 5 foot patch of water like a propeller.
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Rodney

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Re: Can a river get too high?
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2016, 10:45:53 AM »

Sometimes... lol.

November 2006 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLq7A6bc5WY

sbc hris

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Re: Can a river get too high?
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2016, 11:38:22 AM »

I don't think the fish ever just stay put in an event like that. They will just travel the shoreline, or the path of least resistance until they possibly come to an unpassable section of river, but I've never seen one that was caused by high water. Fish can make it through some incredible water. I think what's more important to know in a hypothetical situation like this, is that once the clarity of the river deteriorates to zero, and the water becomes so full of debris that you can't fish, THEN it becomes impossible to catch fish. Clarity is what you should be concerned about, not the actual volume of water coming down the river. And in saying that, you don't need much vis at all to still be successful. A change of tactics is all that's needed. Huge spinners become effective in these situations. You know, the ones that always look to ridiculously big to be useful? Those ones. Just look for water that gives the fish some respite from the heavy current, and drift a huge colorado blade through it.
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Fish or cut bait.

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Re: Can a river get too high?
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2016, 12:35:07 PM »

A lot of runs will change significantly this weekend.
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Fish Assassin

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Re: Can a river get too high?
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2016, 01:08:23 PM »

And, you could see lots and lots of anglers standing right on the edge of the cliffs on slippery rocks where falling in means near certain death. Not quite sure what the technique is called when you have 5 feet of line out and just whirl it over and over through a 5 foot patch of water like a propeller.

Tempting fate. No fish is worth loss of life.
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redtide

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Re: Can a river get too high?
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2016, 05:20:38 PM »

hmmmm...maybe my honeyhole that dried up this summer will return again. will know when the rains finish.
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RalphH

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Re: Can a river get too high?
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2016, 05:30:15 PM »

flood events like the November '06 flood in Rod's video are hell on the fish so it might be better to leave them alone. The Cap may see the dam opened and may be doubly dangerous as a result.
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"Never force conversation on a stranger. They are probably there just to fish and find solitude. If you ask a question or 2 and receive only answers...and no attempt to keep the conversation going, gracefully follow the implied suggestion and leave the angler alone"
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CohoJake

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Re: Can a river get too high?
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2016, 06:03:34 PM »

If it is a major flood event, it could be very bad for any fish that have already spawned - reds will get wiped out and the eggs in gravel will either get buried too deep or washed away.    Spring and summer chinook that have just spawned in the past month could be hit especially hard.  Sockeye could be impacted, but I would think that at least the eggs laid in the lakes themselves would be ok.    Let's just hope it isn't that much rain.  Minor flooding is ok.
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243Pete

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Re: Can a river get too high?
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2016, 02:30:14 AM »

Hopefully this down pour won't be that bad, don't really want to see anything about search and rescue on the Cap or another body recovery performed at the train crossing again.

As for fish going up, it's kinda hard to say. If they are going to go up they are going to go up, if the rain isn't to bad then for sure fish will be coming in.
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