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Author Topic: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction  (Read 3541 times)

mykisscrazy

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Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« on: March 05, 2012, 03:13:36 PM »

Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
 

Thursday March 8th, 1:00 – 2:30 pm

Forest Sciences Centre 1003

Open to the public

 

If you cannot make it in person, you can access the live webinar link here. Please log in 5 minutes early.

 
https://sas.elluminate.com/site/external/launch/meeting.jnlp?sid=2011438&password=M.C9CB73353704E98B140DD91BE97517
 

Abstract: My research program has the aim of discovering how fish work and communicating this knowledge to the scientific community. Where possible, we also inform problems in fish management.  Although we work on a wide variety of fishes, I will present two research vignettes related to salmon in British Columbia. Both topics fall within the broader realm of global climate change.  One vignette will describe some of what we are discovering about the current and future impacts of a warmer Fraser River on adult sockeye salmon migration. The second vignette will describe what we are discovering about the potential impact of sea lice on baby pink salmon.  These two topics juxtapose the need for a secure, healthy food supply for a growing population with that for fish conservation.  The subtext will be that detailed facts cannot be ignored in larger public debates.  The secondary dilemma then becomes one of accurately and effectively communicating critical information to the public, and allowing them to make properly informed decisions about the shape of their future.

Speaker Bio:  Tony holds a joint appointment in the Zoology Department & the Faculty of Land and Food Systems, and he also serves as the Associate Dean for Postdoctoral Fellows at UBC. He is a Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Fish Physiology, Culture and Conservation.  Tony’s research passion is studying how animals are physiologically adapted to their environment.  He is particularly fascinated by the cardiac and respiratory life support systems of fishes and has studied nearly 100 different species, from primitive hagfish and sturgeon through to athletic salmon and tuna. He has published over 340 peer-reviewed research articles.  Tony’s involvement in pioneering and influential research on the behavioural and physiological ecology of Pacific salmon was given the 2005 Award of Excellence in Fisheries Management from the American Fisheries Society.  He was also a member of the scientific advisory committee of the BC Pacific Salmon Forum, which was charged by the Premier to investigate wild and cultured fish interactions in the province.

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Dave

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2012, 03:54:38 PM »

Great link Mykisscrazy ;D  The speaker mentioned is Dr.Tony Farrell and is one of the most published and respected fish physiologists in North America, if not the world. The man is brilliant and I am looking really looking forward to logging into this presentation.
Awesome that the public can see this stuff.  Again, thanks!
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aquapaloosa

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2012, 06:26:59 PM »

I had to travel today so I missed this.  Anyone have any highlights?
Would there be a link to listen to it?
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Dave

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2012, 07:28:50 PM »

The link I read said tomorrow at 1 pm
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aquapaloosa

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2012, 07:55:31 PM »

Yee ha!  Bonus day!  The must be the leap year that's got me ahead one day.

Thanks Dave ;D
« Last Edit: March 07, 2012, 08:03:30 PM by aquapaloosa »
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Dave

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2012, 08:24:12 PM »

Hey, looking forward to this.  Have I said I have HUGE respect for this guy? ;D
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aquapaloosa

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2012, 02:31:24 PM »

Some very interesting information in that.  Thanks again mykiss for this post.
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Dave

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2012, 02:42:59 PM »

Some very interesting information in that.  Thanks again mykiss for this post.
X2.   I think a few people will be squirming ....  the login was seamless for me, if more of these are available in the future please let us know.
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aquapaloosa

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2012, 10:02:36 AM »

I did not know that while pink fry picked up lice they also could shed them consistently too.  I also found it interesting how a fry swimming speed was not changed by the number of lice on them.
The temperature recording chart of an adams river sockeye was very interesting too along with the chat about the differences in the "Aerobic Scope" for the different runs of socks.

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Dave

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2012, 03:28:31 PM »

I'm curious to know how many people took advantage of this opportunity to gain more knowledge and learn something from this seminar.  Other than aquapaloosa and myself, I don't know of any.
If anyone else watched this – what are your thoughts?  Specifically, Dr. Farrells discussion of pink fry and sea lice in the Broughton.
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Easywater

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2012, 06:14:12 PM »

So, you guys heard something that absolutely absolves fish farms from any adverse effects on pink salmon.
Spill the beans instead of trying to goad someone into a pissing match.

Unfortunately, most of us have to work and can't watch webcasts in the middle of the day.

What does the pic show? A jump in water temperature above Hell's Gate?
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alwaysfishn

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2012, 06:36:50 PM »

So, you guys heard something that absolutely absolves fish farms from any adverse effects on pink salmon.
Spill the beans instead of trying to goad someone into a pissing match.

Unfortunately, most of us have to work and can't watch webcasts in the middle of the day.

What does the pic show? A jump in water temperature above Hell's Gate?


Good post! My sentiments exactly...
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Disclosure:  This post has not been approved by the feedlot boys, therefore will likely be found to contain errors and statements that are out of context. :-[

Dave

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2012, 08:14:06 PM »

So, you guys heard something that absolutely absolves fish farms from any adverse effects on pink salmon.
Spill the beans instead of trying to goad someone into a pissing match.

No pissing match.  You raise a good point re. timing of this seminar. As it was posted on the internet I have to think it's available for download.  Mykisscrazy, you started this ;D; is this available for people to see online?   
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chris gadsden

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2012, 08:17:07 PM »

Tony Farrell
Chair, Sustainable Aquaculture and Professor, Zoology and Land and Food Systems


Sustainable Aquaculture???

chris gadsden

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Re: Fishing for Answers: Salmon Facts & Fiction
« Reply #14 on: March 09, 2012, 08:20:47 PM »

What do we mean by sustainability?
In Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada has the federal lead for aquaculture, playing a dual role as both regulator and developer. When we consider sustainability, we take into account three essential, equally important, and inter-connected elements of sustainability – environment, social and economic.

We liken it to a three-legged stool with each leg necessary to support the whole:

Environmental sustainability...
Ensuring ecosystems remain healthy and productive.

Social sustainability...
Supporting and protecting local, First Nations and aboriginal communities and cultures in which aquaculture operates, and providing meaningful jobs.

Economic sustainability...
Encouraging long-term growth of the aquaculture industry and providing stable jobs.



We ensure our aquaculture industry is sustainable by:
•Strict regulations
•Strong monitoring and enforcement
•Basing decisions on in-depth scientific advice
•Mitigating environmental impacts
•Involving communities and stakeholders
•Fostering an aquaculture industry that is proactive and innovative
Aquaculture must be environmentally, socially and economically sustainable to be a viable industry. And each element builds upon another.
For example, if aquaculture businesses do well economically, farmers can invest more in innovation and technology to improve production practices. It is in their best interest to do so in order to ensure that their businesses have strong long-term potential.  And to take it one step further, if aquaculture enterprises protect the environment and the social well-being of the community in which they operate, then the local community is more likely to support them, which in turn leads to meaningful employment and social stability.

Aquaculture businesses have realized that sustainability makes solid business sense